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A Thurillium Plant, I believe.
Lens: Canon 55~250 IS II Lens Camera: Canon EOS Rebel t5. Photo Location: Sherwood Forest ISO: 100 Shutter Speed: 1/90s Aperture: F5.6 
Posted By: Tonytee, 08-29-2017, 10:03 PM



Focal Length 90mm, Manual Exposure Program, No flash and used Multi-Segment Metering.

Thanks for viewing.

TT
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08-29-2017, 10:05 PM   #2
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Good one Tony. Nice colors and detail.
08-30-2017, 04:56 AM   #3
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Thank you a bunch. My wife tells me that the proper name for this subject is: Trillium. It is a very fragile plant so if it is picked, it will never grow back again.

Adios,

TT
08-30-2017, 05:34 AM   #4
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Hi Tony, nicely done!

It looks like a red peace lily, not a trillium (trilliums aren't that fragile either). But you might be better off just agreeing with the misses.

08-30-2017, 06:07 AM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by BrianR Quote
Hi Tony, nicely done!

It looks like a red peace lily, not a trillium (trilliums aren't that fragile either). But you might be better off just agreeing with the misses.
Thanks, and I agree because you are speaking like a married man. )

TT

Last edited by Tonytee; 08-30-2017 at 06:08 AM. Reason: Grammar Error.
08-30-2017, 04:32 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by BrianR Quote
Hi Tony, nicely done!

It looks like a red peace lily, not a trillium (trilliums aren't that fragile either). But you might be better off just agreeing with the misses.
Well, I did look up Trillium and they are very fragile. You can find the information, (like anything else) on Google. I'll ask the Missus again.

TT
08-30-2017, 07:50 PM   #7
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Their fragility is greatly overstated. Removing the foliage will stop it from adding any more energy to its root system that year (and end it's reproductive efforts of the season if it hasn't yet formed seed), but a decently sized one can handle this and will still sprout the following season (likely not as large as if it weren't cut down). Repeated defoliation year after year after year can eventually do them in, but I think it takes some effort.

One of the bushes I regularly walk through has a scattered trillium population. Grazing cattle have access, they don't walk as gently as I do and they also eat Trilliums. There's no way any would be left after the many years they've had access if these plants were as fragile as some people make them out to be. I think intentions are good - if people believe Trilliums are so delicate they may be less likely to pick them, and I do support not picking Trilliums, but it's easy to get carried away when describing their frailty.

Note- I'm speaking of the more common Trillium grandiflorum and T. erectum species, these are the ones I have the most first hand experience with, others may not be as vigorous. Here's a study on T. grandiflorum where they chopped a bunch down to see the effect an early spring browsing by deer would have on the plants fitness- http://www.botany.wisc.edu/waller/PDFs/Rooney.Waller.2001.HowExpDefoliation.pdf. Of the 31 they hacked off, only one failed to return the following year.

08-31-2017, 12:38 AM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by BrianR Quote
Their fragility is greatly overstated. Removing the foliage will stop it from adding any more energy to its root system that year (and end it's reproductive efforts of the season if it hasn't yet formed seed), but a decently sized one can handle this and will still sprout the following season (likely not as large as if it weren't cut down). Repeated defoliation year after year after year can eventually do them in, but I think it takes some effort.

One of the bushes I regularly walk through has a scattered trillium population. Grazing cattle have access, they don't walk as gently as I do and they also eat Trilliums. There's no way any would be left after the many years they've had access if these plants were as fragile as some people make them out to be. I think intentions are good - if people believe Trilliums are so delicate they may be less likely to pick them, and I do support not picking Trilliums, but it's easy to get carried away when describing their frailty.

Note- I'm speaking of the more common Trillium grandiflorum and T. erectum species, these are the ones I have the most first hand experience with, others may not be as vigorous. Here's a study on T. grandiflorum where they chopped a bunch down to see the effect an early spring browsing by deer would have on the plants fitness- http://www.botany.wisc.edu/waller/PDFs/Rooney.Waller.2001.HowExpDefoliation.pdf. Of the 31 they hacked off, only one failed to return the following year.
Hey, this is very gracious of you to provide all of this excellent information. I am sure my wife will be very impressed, so I will thank you again on her behalf.

Best,

Tony
10-29-2019, 05:53 AM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by Tonytee Quote

Focal Length 90mm, Manual Exposure Program, No flash and used Multi-Segment Metering.

Thanks for viewing.

TT
Lovely detail in this textured image.
10-29-2019, 10:10 AM   #10
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Very nice lighting and detail. Bravo, sir.
10-30-2019, 02:32 AM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by DW58 Quote
Good one Tony. Nice colors and detail.

Many thanks Dave.

TT

---------- Post added 10-30-19 at 02:34 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Ash Quote
Lovely detail in this textured image.

Hey there, Community Manager, I thank you very kindly.

TT

---------- Post added 10-30-19 at 02:34 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Dewman Quote
Very nice lighting and detail. Bravo, sir.

I thank you very kindly. )

TT
10-30-2019, 02:50 AM   #12
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Interesting, I know them as Anthuriums.
04-18-2021, 11:53 AM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by Tonytee Quote

Focal Length 90mm, Manual Exposure Program, No flash and used Multi-Segment Metering.

Thanks for viewing.

TT
Nah, Tony, it's an Anthurium
04-18-2021, 05:06 PM - 1 Like   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by RobG Quote
Interesting, I know them as Anthuriums.

I thank you RobG. Very much appreciate the information.

tt

---------- Post added 04-18-21 at 05:07 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by OrchidJulie Quote
Nah, Tony, it's an Anthurium

Thank you very kindly.

tt
04-18-2021, 07:17 PM   #15
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Very nicely captured. There seems to be a soft glow which adds to the shot.
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