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Bird photographers really have my respect.
Posted By: jbrowning, 09-17-2008, 06:22 PM

After I got back from a fly swap gtg in Denver on Sunday. I got home and was grilling up some burgers and took a few pictures.

ISO 100, F/5.6, 300mm, 1/250.


ISO 100, F/5.6, 300mm, 1/250.


ISO 100, F/8, 300mm, 1/250.


These were in my yard and out of 50 shots only these three came out half way decent. You bird photographers really have my respect.
These were taken with the Pentax K20D and Tamron 70-300mm.

Thanks
Jim

Last edited by jbrowning; 09-17-2008 at 07:31 PM.
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09-17-2008, 06:36 PM   #2
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Yeh me too J, very difficult little critters to photograph. Every one started somewhere though. Keep it up.
09-17-2008, 07:13 PM   #3
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It is all a question of patience.

Also, you will find many people concentrate on bigger birds, simply because you don't need to get so close

What you will find, however, is that yes you have a high fall out rate, because the damm things keep moving, hiding behind branches or looking away at the worst time (they really are less cooperative subjects than people), but on the otherhand, when you get a great shot, you know it and appreciate it
09-17-2008, 07:13 PM   #4
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They look good to me Jim. btw, I didn't even know Tamron made a 100-300 lens. Birding with a camera is really fun. One of my favorite activities actually.

09-17-2008, 07:30 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by LaRee Quote
They look good to me Jim. btw, I didn't even know Tamron made a 100-300 lens. Birding with a camera is really fun. One of my favorite activities actually.
You are so on your game LaRee, its the 70-300mm.

Jim
09-17-2008, 07:36 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
It is all a question of patience.

Also, you will find many people concentrate on bigger birds, simply because you don't need to get so close

What you will find, however, is that yes you have a high fall out rate, because the damm things keep moving, hiding behind branches or looking away at the worst time (they really are less cooperative subjects than people), but on the otherhand, when you get a great shot, you know it and appreciate it
Heck Lowell I have a high fall out rate on anything I photograph . I do like shooting the blue harons that come by every so often. I guess these critters were just convenient to shot and fairly cooperative.

Thanks
Jim
09-18-2008, 05:22 AM   #7
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Patience, stealth, location, and luck. I took a lot of bird photos this summer. And no lens is ever long or fast enough it seems

Also it helps if they're more interested in getting laid than in the guy stalking in the weeds trying to take their picture.
09-18-2008, 06:12 AM   #8
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Yup, like everyone else said those little !*^%$%#$ are hard to catch sometimes . For me that is what makes wildlife photography so much fun, not that I'm really any good at it, but fun all the same.

Oh, forgot to mention nice photos!


John

09-18-2008, 05:41 PM   #9
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I have a variety of feeders out all winter and have several regulars that come to feed at different times of the day. If they get use to you being around they are much easier to photograph. jim
09-19-2008, 09:00 AM   #10
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Don't forget that wildlife shooters are mostly using 500 mm or longer lenses. Or atleast 300 mm with some TC.
09-19-2008, 10:22 AM   #11
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Thanks everybody for the info. My Sigma 50-500mm just got here today. So this weekend I will be out seeing if my birdies look any better.

Thanks
Jim
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