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Olympus OM-D E-M1 II Mounted With Meyer Optik 58MM 1.9 (Woodpecker in Flight)
Lens: Meyer Optik 58MM 1.9 Camera: Olympus OM-D E-M1 II Photo Location: Porter, IN ISO: 800 Shutter Speed: 1/2000s Aperture: F1.9 
Posted By: Lmcfarrin, 01-22-2019, 08:30 PM

The best lens, Meyer Optik 58MM 1.9.

Last edited by Lmcfarrin; 06-19-2019 at 07:31 PM.
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01-22-2019, 09:41 PM   #2
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What a terrific capture!
01-22-2019, 10:00 PM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by ToddK Quote
What a terrific capture!
Thanks
01-22-2019, 10:53 PM   #4
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Nice shot. The wing pattern is quite mesmerising. Better focus on this one than the others but getting the shot with a 55mm is a tough call.

01-22-2019, 11:31 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by PJ1 Quote
Nice shot. The wing pattern is quite mesmerising. Better focus on this one than the others but getting the shot with a 55mm is a tough call.
Due to the speed of the birds (about 14 to 20 feet per second) I can't use auto focus and typical human reaction time. All of my shots are acquired through manual focus traps. These birds are impossible to track with AF due to their upredicatble appearance and flight paths which requires the use of manual focus. To use AF would require to shoot from a hide/ far distance away, which requires a telephoto lens, which produces tighter framing and a flattened viewing plane, which eliminates the ability to acquire unique to rarely seen angles of view while the bird is in flight. To acquire the extreme angle captures requires getting in close, which requires 35MM to approximately 135MM, and of course AF can't be used at a distance of about 6 to 15 feet from the bird - its hard enough to get a camera that close. However. I've been doing this routinely for the past three years so the birds are somewhat use to me and my cameras which allows me to get in close.

The short version of what I just wrote, because AF is not an option due to the speed, size and unpredictability of the birds - by using manual focus there will be sacrifices made to obtain the shot. Images may be slightly out of focus and noisier. I don't expect my action bif photos to survive the critiques that are typically evaluated for a bird thats not moving. My main goal is to acquire the capture and all other photographic aspects are secondary.

Thank you for your feedback.

Last edited by Lmcfarrin; 01-23-2019 at 09:43 AM.
01-23-2019, 11:20 AM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lmcfarrin Quote
The best lens, Meyer Optik 58MM 1.9.
Is this one landing? {this is the wing arrangement I usually see then}
01-23-2019, 11:44 AM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by reh321 Quote
Is this one landing? {this is the wing arrangement I usually see then}
Yes. He's on approach to the feeder.
01-23-2019, 05:16 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by PJ1 Quote
Better focus on this one than the others but getting the shot with a 55mm is a tough call.
Furthermore on the topic of focus, fast lenses (f2 and faster) have a gift and a curse. On a dreary, shady, rainy day the fast lenses become essential for light gathering, but at the same time depending on the angle of the bird in relation to the position of the lens - one 1/2 of the bird could be tack sharp and the other 1/2 out of focus. More of a reason why a bif photo shouldn't be evaluated with the same critique standards of a stationary bird (not that you were). An example is my Blue Jay pic taken with the A6000 at f1.9. The wing closet to the camera is in focus, but the bird's head is slightly out of focus. I take what I can and make a determination if it's good enough. Until there is examples to compare it to, its good enough.

01-23-2019, 05:21 PM   #9
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Very nice photo, congrats! I would never have thought of using a primoplan for birding, interesting!
01-23-2019, 06:20 PM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by IgorZ Quote
Very nice photo, congrats! I would never have thought of using a primoplan for birding, interesting!
My "claim to fame" is the primary use of 35MM to 135MM. I am definitely a contrarian when it comes to bird photography. I find out what everyone else is doing and purposely do the opposite.
01-23-2019, 07:21 PM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lmcfarrin Quote
Due to the speed of the birds (about 14 to 20 feet per second) I can't use auto focus and typical human reaction time. All of my shots are acquired through manual focus traps. These birds are impossible to track with AF due to their upredicatble appearance and flight paths which requires the use of manual focus. To use AF would require to shoot from a hide/ far distance away, which requires a telephoto lens, which produces tighter framing and a flattened viewing plane, which eliminates the ability to acquire unique to rarely seen angles of view while the bird is in flight. To acquire the extreme angle captures requires getting in close, which requires 35MM to approximately 135MM, and of course AF can't be used at a distance of about 6 to 15 feet from the bird - its hard enough to get a camera that close. However. I've been doing this routinely for the past three years so the birds are somewhat use to me and my cameras which allows me to get in close.

The short version of what I just wrote, because AF is not an option due to the speed, size and unpredictability of the birds - by using manual focus there will be sacrifices made to obtain the shot. Images may be slightly out of focus and noisier. I don't expect my action bif photos to survive the critiques that are typically evaluated for a bird thats not moving. My main goal is to acquire the capture and all other photographic aspects are secondary.

Thank you for your feedback.
QuoteOriginally posted by Lmcfarrin Quote
Furthermore on the topic of focus, fast lenses (f2 and faster) have a gift and a curse. On a dreary, shady, rainy day the fast lenses become essential for light gathering, but at the same time depending on the angle of the bird in relation to the position of the lens - one 1/2 of the bird could be tack sharp and the other 1/2 out of focus. More of a reason why a bif photo shouldn't be evaluated with the same critique standards of a stationary bird (not that you were). An example is my Blue Jay pic taken with the A6000 at f1.9. The wing closet to the camera is in focus, but the bird's head is slightly out of focus. I take what I can and make a determination if it's good enough. Until there is examples to compare it to, its good enough.
I like your description of the methodology, very good approach.

A quick question though, have you considered stopping down and using a flash? It would offer better depth of field and a little sharpness improvement due to the short burst duration. Or is the subject distance too difficult to get a good and consistent expsoure.
01-23-2019, 07:36 PM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
A quick question though, have you considered stopping down and using a flash? It would offer better depth of field and a little sharpness improvement due to the short burst duration. Or is the subject distance too difficult to get a good and consistent expsoure.
Depending on distances involved, that might decrease interest resulting from bokeh background.
01-23-2019, 07:38 PM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
I like your description of the methodology, very good approach.

A quick question though, have you considered stopping down and using a flash? It would offer better depth of field and a little sharpness improvement due to the short burst duration. Or is the subject distance too difficult to get a good and consistent expsoure.
Yes, I have. The "problem" with flash is you lose speed and the camera is then relegated to single shot and chance of an in focus shot becomes even more unlikely. I'm using fps to let the bird fly itself into focus while the frames capture the birds' movement through/ across the frame. Furthermore, the flash also startles the birds which reduces the likelihood of their return. I need the birds to be comfortable so I can get them to acquire a routine. I have a routine and they have a routine. A sort of Zen. I want to become a part of and accepted into their community. The shutter sound also startles them, but not as much as flash.

Lastly, I have broken two flashes because when you pitch your camera at a 45 degree angle hours on end the flashes slipped off and broke. I use 5 cameras at once. I'm also trying to keep things affordable.

---------- Post added 01-23-19 at 08:52 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by IgorZ Quote
Very nice photo, congrats! I would never have thought of using a primoplan for birding, interesting!
Thats my contrarian point. Im using lenses and approaching bif where I can carve my own lane of operation and uniqueness.

Metaphorically, a way of cutting to the front of the line to be accepted as a skillful photographer and create my own definition or production of what is a "good" photograph. Not for egotistical satisfaction, but to be relevant and produce valued content.

Why can't i be an Ansel Adams? Because I'm not Ansel Adams, but I am Lawrence -M- wanting to be respected as Ansel Adams.

Last edited by Lmcfarrin; 01-23-2019 at 08:07 PM.
01-24-2019, 04:55 AM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
I like your description of the methodology, very good approach.

A quick question though, have you considered stopping down and using a flash? It would offer better depth of field and a little sharpness improvement due to the short burst duration. Or is the subject distance too difficult to get a good and consistent expsoure.
QuoteOriginally posted by reh321 Quote
Depending on distances involved, that might decrease interest resulting from bokeh background.
I am not talking of stopping down so far that you are approaching for example the hyper focal distance, also depending on set up, and base exposure without flash the background falls out of interest because it is darker than subject, flash can generate background separation by under exposure of the background.

QuoteOriginally posted by Lmcfarrin Quote
Yes, I have. The "problem" with flash is you lose speed and the camera is then relegated to single shot and chance of an in focus shot becomes even more unlikely. I'm using fps to let the bird fly itself into focus while the frames capture the birds' movement through/ across the frame. Furthermore, the flash also startles the birds which reduces the likelihood of their return. I need the birds to be comfortable so I can get them to acquire a routine. I have a routine and they have a routine. A sort of Zen. I want to become a part of and accepted into their community. The shutter sound also startles them, but not as much as flash.

Lastly, I have broken two flashes because when you pitch your camera at a 45 degree angle hours on end the flashes slipped off and broke. I use 5 cameras at once. I'm also trying to keep things affordable.





Thats my contrarian point. Im using lenses and approaching bif where I can carve my own lane of operation and uniqueness.

Metaphorically, a way of cutting to the front of the line to be accepted as a skillful photographer and create my own definition or production of what is a "good" photograph. Not for egotistical satisfaction, but to be relevant and produce valued content.

Why can't i be an Ansel Adams? Because I'm not Ansel Adams, but I am Lawrence -M- wanting to be respected as Ansel Adams.
I was thinking trap focus not the HiGh frame rate of the camera to capture the motion, considering the evolution of video, it might be better to use a single frame out of a 4 K video then "still" images but I leave that to you

As to the flash being an issue, with startling the birds, I understand and the concern, but do not necessarily agree. Any where that I have photographed birds, my experience is that if they are not disturbed by your presence, there is no issue, they do not even seem to react to the flash. This is especially true when monitoring a feeder,

At my house, the feeder is within a few feet of my back yard patio table, (located in the garden between several trees) you can sit at the table and have a conversation ongoing and the jays, cardinals, chickadees, nuthatches, finches and sparrows, just zoom by in and out of the feeders seemingly oblivious to ones presence. The difficulty, as you point out is getting the perfect shot as they are impossible to track with a telephoto and AF.
01-24-2019, 07:08 AM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
I am not talking of stopping down so far that you are approaching for example the hyper focal distance, also depending on set up, and base exposure without flash the background falls out of interest because it is darker than subject, flash can generate background separation by under exposure of the background.



I was thinking trap focus not the HiGh frame rate of the camera to capture the motion, considering the evolution of video, it might be better to use a single frame out of a 4 K video then "still" images but I leave that to you

As to the flash being an issue, with startling the birds, I understand and the concern, but do not necessarily agree. Any where that I have photographed birds, my experience is that if they are not disturbed by your presence, there is no issue, they do not even seem to react to the flash. This is especially true when monitoring a feeder,

At my house, the feeder is within a few feet of my back yard patio table, (located in the garden between several trees) you can sit at the table and have a conversation ongoing and the jays, cardinals, chickadees, nuthatches, finches and sparrows, just zoom by in and out of the feeders seemingly oblivious to ones presence. The difficulty, as you point out is getting the perfect shot as they are impossible to track with a telephoto and AF.
in regards to video capture, the Sony RX10 III is "the best" out of the group I own (RX10 III, E-M5, E-M1 II, K-5, K-3 II, A6000). Still from Vid can be done either in post or a dedicated camera function. If taking a still from Full HD or UHD 4K = 2 MP still. From Sony 4K = 8 MP. The images do not resolve as good as 20 MP m43 raw or 24 MP Aps-c raw and no room for crop. I've done it with te Sony, but prefer to squeeze the best resolution through regular still shooting (images are examples from Sony still from 4K video). In regards to flash, I've tried it and haven't had good results. Since I'm using up to 6 cameras to increase my chances of still captures with a less than 1% keeper rate. I'd have to make all future camera purchases be capable of 4K resolution better than UHD.

Last edited by Lmcfarrin; 06-19-2019 at 07:31 PM.
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