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Warbird Round 2019 - P40s and P47s
Lens: DFA 150-450, DFA 28-105, Tamrom 17-50 Camera: Pentax K-3, Pentax K-1 Photo Location: Nampa, Idaho 
Posted By: dwalt, 09-03-2019, 05:23 AM

Here are the:
Curtiss P-40N Warhawk
Curtiss P-40E Kittyhawk
Republic P-47D-28-RA Thunderbolt
Republic P-47G Thunderbolt

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09-03-2019, 05:32 AM   #2
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It's great to see and hear the warbirds flying.
09-03-2019, 05:42 AM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by TER-OR Quote
It's great to see and hear the warbirds flying.
Yes, its great seeing them start up on the line as well. All the planes have stories. The P-47D was in a lake in Austria for 50 years before it was recovered and brought back to flying status again.
09-03-2019, 07:03 PM   #4
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Great shots! Interesting that you change names for different models of the P40. I thought the naming was more to do with who was flying them. I'll have to look that up. The three names I've seen associated with the P40 are Tomahawk, Warhawk and Kittyhawk.

PS A quick check of Wikipedia suggests that the US only used Warhawk, while the Commonwealth forces used Tomahawk for early models and Kittyhawk for later models. That explains why I've seen Tomahawk associated with the North Africa campaign and Kittyhawk for the war in the Pacific.

09-04-2019, 05:05 AM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by RobG Quote
Great shots! Interesting that you change names for different models of the P40. I thought the naming was more to do with who was flying them. I'll have to look that up. The three names I've seen associated with the P40 are Tomahawk, Warhawk and Kittyhawk.

PS A quick check of Wikipedia suggests that the US only used Warhawk, while the Commonwealth forces used Tomahawk for early models and Kittyhawk for later models. That explains why I've seen Tomahawk associated with the North Africa campaign and Kittyhawk for the war in the Pacific.
Yeah, the Brits named planes more than we did - at least officially. The US just gave them numbers until WW2. All the Curtiss fighters were Hawks, trainers Falcons. Their big planes got names like Condor etc. but all that was internal to Curtiss, though the official names tended to follow suit. I liked the Grumman series of cat names, too.
09-04-2019, 10:35 AM   #6
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Wow - a truly enjoyable series!

Jer
09-04-2019, 12:47 PM   #7
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It's great seeing that Razorback T-bolt in the air. There are a few left, and Razorback Mustangs.
My Father-in-Law was 4th FG ground crew, went over with the first batch of P-47Ds they received. That was an adjustment from the Eagle Squadron's Spitfires, but the 4th was deadly with the Jug.
09-04-2019, 03:24 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by TER-OR Quote
Yeah, the Brits named planes more than we did - at least officially. The US just gave them numbers until WW2. All the Curtiss fighters were Hawks, trainers Falcons. Their big planes got names like Condor etc. but all that was internal to Curtiss, though the official names tended to follow suit. I liked the Grumman series of cat names, too.
True, now that you mention it, the numbers stuck for some more than the names - I'd forgotten that the B17 was called the Flying Fortress, yet I'd tend to call the P51 a Mustang more than just a P51. I'm curious whether Americans tended to use the names or numbers more. I think the British used numbers for prototypes, but stuck with names and variants like the Spitfire Mk VII. In Australia, the Commonwealth Aircraft Factory had designations like the CA-17 (which was actually a Mustang built under license), but the names were used in practice as far as I know.

09-04-2019, 03:59 PM   #9
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LOVE that Razorback! Nice shots.
09-05-2019, 05:21 AM - 1 Like   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by RobG Quote
True, now that you mention it, the numbers stuck for some more than the names - I'd forgotten that the B17 was called the Flying Fortress, yet I'd tend to call the P51 a Mustang more than just a P51. I'm curious whether Americans tended to use the names or numbers more. I think the British used numbers for prototypes, but stuck with names and variants like the Spitfire Mk VII. In Australia, the Commonwealth Aircraft Factory had designations like the CA-17 (which was actually a Mustang built under license), but the names were used in practice as far as I know.
Pre-War the US used numbers. Occasionally a name would stick, but it was informal. I think members of the press gave the Flying Fortress moniker. The Brits gave all our planes names, and they had a pattern. Trainers named after schools - Oxford, Harvard etc. Bombers after cities - Blenheim, Lancaster, Manchester, Hudson etc. Fighters got more colorful and spirited names - Spitfire, Spiteful, Defiant etc. I think the observation planes got bird names a lot of the time - Albatross, Gannett, etc. I don't think the rules were really hard though, since we got planes like the Tiger Moth (and other moths in that series). There's got to be some history behind it all.

The Brits named the P-51 the Mustang (the A-36 verison the Apache). I think by the end of the war and certainly after we were giving planes official names. Not all of them stuck.
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