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Bridges
Lens: Pentax 16-45 Camera: K10D Photo Location: Sydney 
Posted By: adamaitken2020, 04-01-2020, 11:22 PM

Sydney Harbour Bridge built in the 1930s and connects the north and south shores of my city.

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04-02-2020, 06:27 AM   #2
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Very nice image. I really like the composition with the signal lights. I was in your city in February and really loved it. I took a lot of photos of the bridge from many different locations, so I will post a few once I get all of my processing done (it seems to be taking forever).
04-02-2020, 08:13 AM   #3
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Very cool. The bridge frames the cityscape. I like this one a lot.

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04-02-2020, 09:47 PM   #4
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Nice shot - as Todd mentioned, it's interesting to have the traffic lights included. I'm also curious to see that there's a bit if a starburst on the bridge lights. I don't remember the DA16-45 giving me that effect, although the Tamron 17-50 does.

For the non-Australians who might read this, some trivia comes to mind;

  • Before he became an actor, Paul Hogan was a rigger on the bridge. The scene in Crocodile Dundee where he swung off the Empire State building didn't bother him.
  • I believe that a bridge of the same type was built in the USA, but only two lanes wide - the engineers waited until the length of the Sydney bridge was known and made theirs a few metres longer in order to claim the "world's longest" title at the time (it appears to be the Bayonne Bridge in New York, 7 metres longer).
  • Originally, the Sydney Harbour bridge had four wide road lanes in the middle (two each way, later changed to six lanes), two rail lines on the western side and two tram lines on the eastern side as well as a pedestrian walkway. The tram lines were later removed and became the Cahill expressway.
  • At the time the bridge was opened, the population of Sydney was only about 1.2 million, and the crowd attending the opening was said to be over a quarter of the city population (but possibly as many as a million people).
  • As a child, I remember a family friend showing me a copy of the Sydney Morning Herald she had kept from the day the two halves of the bridge were joined. I don't remember whether she was part of that crowd who walked across the day it opened.
  • The impressive looking stone pylons actually play no role in supporting the bridge. They are purely decoration. The weight of the bridge is supported by four massive joints, two at each end, which are at the base of the pylons.
  • I was told on a school excursion that they are constantly painting the bridge. They start at one end, work their way to the other end, then start again. I don't think the repainting is as frequent these days, but there were issues with removing the original lead based paints and replacing them with newer safer formulations.


04-02-2020, 11:11 PM - 1 Like   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by ToddK Quote
Very nice image. I really like the composition with the signal lights. I was in your city in February and really loved it. I took a lot of photos of the bridge from many different locations, so I will post a few once I get all of my processing done (it seems to be taking forever).
Thanks very much!

---------- Post added 04-02-20 at 11:13 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by ToddK Quote
Very nice image. I really like the composition with the signal lights. I was in your city in February and really loved it. I took a lot of photos of the bridge from many different locations, so I will post a few once I get all of my processing done (it seems to be taking forever).
Thanks Todd, and I hope you can visit us again. If you have the time Google the Australian photographer Max Dupain. He is the pioneer of Harbour Bridge photography and other great stuff. He inspires us to go out and try to be as good.

---------- Post added 04-02-20 at 11:17 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by RobG Quote
Nice shot - as Todd mentioned, it's interesting to have the traffic lights included. I'm also curious to see that there's a bit if a starburst on the bridge lights. I don't remember the DA16-45 giving me that effect, although the Tamron 17-50 does.

For the non-Australians who might read this, some trivia comes to mind;

  • Before he became an actor, Paul Hogan was a rigger on the bridge. The scene in Crocodile Dundee where he swung off the Empire State building didn't bother him.
  • I believe that a bridge of the same type was built in the USA, but only two lanes wide - the engineers waited until the length of the Sydney bridge was known and made theirs a few metres longer in order to claim the "world's longest" title at the time (it appears to be the Bayonne Bridge in New York, 7 metres longer).
  • Originally, the Sydney Harbour bridge had four wide road lanes in the middle (two each way, later changed to six lanes), two rail lines on the western side and two tram lines on the eastern side as well as a pedestrian walkway. The tram lines were later removed and became the Cahill expressway.
  • At the time the bridge was opened, the population of Sydney was only about 1.2 million, and the crowd attending the opening was said to be over a quarter of the city population (but possibly as many as a million people).
  • As a child, I remember a family friend showing me a copy of the Sydney Morning Herald she had kept from the day the two halves of the bridge were joined. I don't remember whether she was part of that crowd who walked across the day it opened.
  • The impressive looking stone pylons actually play no role in supporting the bridge. They are purely decoration. The weight of the bridge is supported by four massive joints, two at each end, which are at the base of the pylons.
  • I was told on a school excursion that they are constantly painting the bridge. They start at one end, work their way to the other end, then start again. I don't think the repainting is as frequent these days, but there were issues with removing the original lead based paints and replacing them with newer safer formulations.
Hi RobG
Yes, I waited for the lights to go red, though I didn't take any when they were green. It was quite cold that morning! The star burst came from the DA 16-45. A nice accident as I didn't intend it. Great info-trivia too.
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