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sperm whale beached itself and died; this is what happened (2)
Lens: DFA150-450, FA31 Camera: K-1 Photo Location: Vlieland, the Netherlands 
Posted By: Fries, 01-12-2021, 05:29 PM

This is a continuation of this thread:A sperm whale beached itself and died; this is what happened (1) - PentaxForums.com. On the second day two teams of researchers complimented with people using heavy equipment tore the animal apart so it could be transported for destruction. Some parts have been kept for further research. Members who don't want to see this rather bloody business are advised not to scroll further down.

Cheers,

Remco

1. On the beginning of the second day we discovered the lower jaw of the animal containing ivory teeth had been cut off by the authorities the evening before to prevent poaching.


2. After the first cut the pressure inside the animal forced the innards to come out.


3. Pepijn Kamminga from the nation Nature centre Naturalis is taking a rest from the heavy and bloody work.


4. Heavy equipment is used.


5. Cutting deep...


6. Smaller parts are being prepared for research.


7. Much bigger parts get a different treatment.


After that we stopped filming and I stopped taking pictures. Chain saws where used and I am mindful of what is usable for public 'consumption' and what not. Most of the pictures above have been publicized. Not only by our own regional tv, and radiostation but also by the biggest national public broadcaster NOS.
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01-12-2021, 05:52 PM   #2
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Whew your lens choice is understood . Journalism can be difficult .
01-12-2021, 06:14 PM   #3
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Nice series!
01-13-2021, 08:09 AM   #4
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A striking series, my friend.

Jer

01-13-2021, 08:32 AM   #5
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Quite a story Remco and well-told.
01-13-2021, 03:56 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by pichaser Quote
Whew your lens choice is understood . Journalism can be difficult .
They can be rather smelly at this stage of decomposition... Journalism is fantastic because I feel privileged to witness some really extraordinary stuff and get paid. But it is hard work. Luckily this time I was sent here with a cameraman and back at work my colleagues were able to proces the raw footage with some help from me. The DFA150-450 with the K-1 is a winning combination in my book especially in these circumstances.

QuoteOriginally posted by ktbartosik Quote
Nice series!
Thanks!
QuoteOriginally posted by Sailor Quote
A striking series, my friend.

Thanks Jer! Besides the gory details it was a really nice opportunity to wield a camera.

Jer
QuoteOriginally posted by slowpez Quote
Quite a story Remco and well-told.
Thanks Susan! Besides these photo's I had about five live moments on the radio and two tv-reports to tell te story.
01-14-2021, 08:59 PM   #7
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Quite a series. The thickness of their blubber is impressive... Hopefully the University gathers good information from the samples they took.
01-17-2021, 03:08 AM   #8
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Quite an impressive and unusual series. As far as research goes, I'm guessing that areas such as age, condition, etc, would be explored. Anything else that you are aware ?

Amazing the size of the whale. Certainly the scale of the size of the animal is apparent in the photos of the heavy equipment such as the front end loader, people and excavator, alongside the carcass of the whale.

01-17-2021, 05:25 AM   #9
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Itís a striking, well done series. One of the times photography serves the journalistic purpose with a great deal of artistic quality. Elements of scale, color, perspective and composition are obvious. I enjoyed the first photo the most. Impressive beast, itís really sad to see it being cut in pieces.
01-17-2021, 03:33 PM   #10
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Age, condition, diseases, chemical samples of the blubber and organs where such things tend to accumulate, that sort of thing.
01-17-2021, 04:56 PM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by RoxnDox Quote
Quite a series. The thickness of their blubber is impressive... Hopefully the University gathers good information from the samples they took.
QuoteOriginally posted by RoxnDox Quote
Age, condition, diseases, chemical samples of the blubber and organs where such things tend to accumulate, that sort of thing.
It was the first time I've seen a whale being cut to pieces and the thickness of the blubber impressed me too. But they are creatures of the deep see and can tolerate really cold water so I guess that kind of explains it. They haven't found a 'smoking gun' for the beaching. The lead researcher posted this on Instragram:"The sperm whale stranded on Vlieland was examined on Saturday by the team from the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of @utrechtuniversity with help of @naturalismuseum BDS Harlingen and @rijkswaterstaat. The work had to be done in one day, meaning a necropsy under time pressure. Veterinary pathologists and biologists collected as much data and samples as possible, which are further examined in the lab and under the microscope. In addition, the stomach was collected for dietary analyses of @wurmarine. Sperm whales have no chance in the shallow Southern North Sea. Once stranded, they usually die quickly. The cause of death is in most cases directly related to the stranding. Gravity plays an important role. Once stranded, the animals suffer under their own weight, and breathing is difficult when whales strand on their sides. It is therefore more interesting to ask why sperm whales swim into the North Sea at all: is it due to bad luck or are there underlying problems?"

QuoteOriginally posted by lesmore49 Quote
Quite an impressive and unusual series. As far as research goes, I'm guessing that areas such as age, condition, etc, would be explored. Anything else that you are aware ?

Amazing the size of the whale. Certainly the scale of the size of the animal is apparent in the photos of the heavy equipment such as the front end loader, people and excavator, alongside the carcass of the whale.
Thanks! Everything I have posted the information about the research above. But she (the researcher) said it was a young not fully grown male and almost 14 meters long. And the scale of the fish and the whole operation also made it a rather costly to remove it. One of the guys in charge quoted me 40.000 euro's; about 48.000 dollars.

QuoteOriginally posted by Michail_P Quote
It’s a striking, well done series. One of the times photography serves the journalistic purpose with a great deal of artistic quality. Elements of scale, color, perspective and composition are obvious. I enjoyed the first photo the most. Impressive beast, it’s really sad to see it being cut in pieces.
Thanks Michail! There are more and more people asking why these animals can't be disposed of in a more fitting way and there are initiatives to do just that. One of the problems is that the islands where they mostly end up are mostly dependent on tourism and they don't want a rotting carcass on their beaches. But there are alternatives! According to the law what you see here, is supposed to be the only way to deal with them at this moment. But a small whale endend up on a unpopulated small island a short time ago and as an exception it was left there. It currently is being monitored by researches. You can follow their work here (in Dutch): Walviskadaver op Rottumeroog. Het afbraakproces in beeld. Uitgebreid onderzoek naar het vergaan van een walvis. Het kadaver trekt dieren aan. - Basismonitoring Wadden The first photo of the day on top of this series is my favorite too.
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