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The Iris Nebula.
Lens: RC6 Camera: K3II Photo Location: Pritchard B.C. ISO: 800 Shutter Speed: Above 6s Aperture: F9 
Posted By: aitrus3, 06-25-2021, 11:31 AM

This is the Iris nebula, with better collimation than M51 but not quite perfect still. Square edit, as I missed the framing I was going for.


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06-25-2021, 03:07 PM   #2
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Excellent image.
06-25-2021, 04:14 PM   #3
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Beautiful none the less. A window into the universe.
06-25-2021, 04:30 PM   #4
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Fascinating image, well done.

06-26-2021, 02:50 AM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by aitrus3 Quote
This is the Iris nebula, with better collimation than M51 but not quite perfect still. Square edit, as I missed the framing I was going for.

I take it these are the colours as seen and not by combining selective narrow-wavelength filtering? Many academic images are false-coloured to highlight distribution of particular elements in stellar objects for research purposes.
06-26-2021, 03:22 AM - 1 Like   #6
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Amazing! I'd love to get shots like this, but the telescope, tripod and tracker are a big investment. Thanks for sharing! Hopefully there will be some more dark nights with clear skies soon when I can try the astrotracer again.
06-26-2021, 08:44 AM - 1 Like   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by StiffLegged Quote
I take it these are the colours as seen and not by combining selective narrow-wavelength filtering? Many academic images are false-coloured to highlight distribution of particular elements in stellar objects for research purposes.

This is from the K3II, so it is RGB and not narrowband. You actually wouldn't want to shoot this object in narrowband. It's a bright reflection nebula, so like galaxies, it is considered a broadband target. If you were to use narrowband filters it would cut out a lot of the light that this target emits making it more challenging to capture a decent image.
I think this was only around 2hrs worth from my Bortle 3 backyard.

QuoteOriginally posted by RobG Quote
Amazing! I'd love to get shots like this, but the telescope, tripod and tracker are a big investment. Thanks for sharing! Hopefully there will be some more dark nights with clear skies soon when I can try the astrotracer again.
Thanks! Yes the mounts can be an investment. But, you can start to get really nice results with even a move-shoot-move tracker or the Star Adventurer and a telephoto lens. This target is relatively small, smaller than the full moon. But there are many objects that are many times bigger than the full moon and 135mm on a star adventurer would get you amazing images.

06-26-2021, 09:11 AM - 1 Like   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by aitrus3 Quote
This is from the K3II, so it is RGB and not narrowband. You actually wouldn't want to shoot this object in narrowband. It's a bright reflection nebula, so like galaxies, it is considered a broadband target. If you were to use narrowband filters it would cut out a lot of the light that this target emits making it more challenging to capture a decent image.
I think this was only around 2hrs worth from my Bortle 3 backyard.
Thanks, I hoped it was RGB!
06-26-2021, 11:07 AM   #9
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Nice shot!
06-26-2021, 11:15 PM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by aitrus3 Quote
This is the Iris nebula, with better collimation than M51 but not quite perfect still. Square edit, as I missed the framing I was going for.

These kind of pictures are always beautiful, well done
06-27-2021, 03:24 AM   #11
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Ahhhh! Mysteries of the Universe. I am an SF/Star trekker from way back so I go bananas enjoying images like this. Then I go green with envy of those who can take such images themselves!!!
06-27-2021, 03:33 AM - 1 Like   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by aitrus3 Quote
Thanks! Yes the mounts can be an investment. But, you can start to get really nice results with even a move-shoot-move tracker or the Star Adventurer and a telephoto lens. This target is relatively small, smaller than the full moon. But there are many objects that are many times bigger than the full moon and 135mm on a star adventurer would get you amazing images.
Thanks! I'll see what I can do with the astrotracer.
06-27-2021, 03:55 AM - 1 Like   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by rm2 Quote
Beautiful none the less. A window into the universe.
This, and opened to us by talented lot here on this forum - Thankyou
06-27-2021, 05:34 AM - 1 Like   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by vijaykishan Quote
This, and opened to us by talented lot here on this forum - Thankyou
thanks I'm still a beginner. Hope to improve even more. How I'd love to get my hands on a full spectrum K7 or K5...


QuoteOriginally posted by RobG Quote
Thanks! I'll see what I can do with the astrotracer.
it's quite capable. I've recently learned a lot about field rotation and alt-az mounts. When you use it, plan for a target that is lower on the horizon to the east or west. The straighter you shoot in those directions, you greatly reduce field rotation and can increase your exposure length. By how much depends on your latitude. The further north you are the longer you can go before field rotation becomes an issue. N/S GREATLY reduces the exposure time, as does how high in the sky you're pointed. So, try east/west and at or below 20deg height.


QuoteOriginally posted by K2 to K50 Quote
Ahhhh! Mysteries of the Universe. I am an SF/Star trekker from way back so I go bananas enjoying images like this. Then I go green with envy of those who can take such images themselves!!!
Thanks I love star trek too


QuoteOriginally posted by Reciprocity Quote
These kind of pictures are always beautiful, well done
QuoteOriginally posted by SelrahCharleS Quote
Nice shot!
many thanks you two!


QuoteOriginally posted by StiffLegged Quote
Thanks, I hoped it was RGB!
yeah, it's a fairly bright target. 6.8 mag, only a few orders less than m42 at 4 mag.
06-27-2021, 06:31 AM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by aitrus3 Quote
it's quite capable. I've recently learned a lot about field rotation and alt-az mounts. When you use it, plan for a target that is lower on the horizon to the east or west. The straighter you shoot in those directions, you greatly reduce field rotation and can increase your exposure length. By how much depends on your latitude. The further north you are the longer you can go before field rotation becomes an issue. N/S GREATLY reduces the exposure time, as does how high in the sky you're pointed. So, try east/west and at or below 20deg height.
Yes, I've wondered if people in Europe at high latitudes have more success than folks at lower latitudes. Where I am is 35.28 degrees south, while London is 51.5 degrees north! On the other hand, the designers were in Japan, and (for example) Tokyo's latitude is similar to Canberra at 35.68 degrees north. Is the astrotracer unable to compensate for field rotation? Most of the interesting objects in the sky from here are in the south, with perhaps the exception of Orion.
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