Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
  #1
Changing a Shot
Posted By: Jimbo, 05-19-2009, 08:02 PM

Ok, picture taken with same camera settings [ 200 ISO 16mm F13 @ 1/60. The big difference is the scond shot had a ND8 filter on. The PP work was very similar with really less adjustment on the ND8 filtered picture. The big difference is in the sky and mountains. I need to use this filter more and more on shots like this. Also shot hand held as I was a little to lazy to set the tri-pod up. Lots of potential for this filter set up. JIM





Views: 1,238
05-19-2009, 08:48 PM   #2
Ole
Administrator
Ole's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 4,117
The second shot is very dramatic! Much preferable over the first!
05-19-2009, 10:04 PM   #3
Pentaxian
Jimbo's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Maple Ridge BC Canada
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 11,363
Original Poster
QuoteQuote:
The second shot is very dramatic! Much preferable over the first!
__________________
Ole
Thanks Ole and I agree. Changes the lighting just enough. JIM
05-19-2009, 10:09 PM   #4
Pentaxian
mike.hiran's Avatar

Join Date: May 2007
Location: portland
Photos: Albums
Posts: 1,461
very interesting... I've been using a graduated filter more often lately, but these were taken with a solid nd filter? hmmm... this has me wanting to try this a bit. Thanks for sharing. And great shot(s) by the way!

05-19-2009, 10:09 PM   #5
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Sailor's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Coastal Texas
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 20,270
Dang! I can't make up my mind, buddy. The second one definitely has more "punch" but is less subtle, maybe less natural than the first one. Frankly, both look spectacular to me, so I'm no help.

Jer
05-19-2009, 10:22 PM   #6
Veteran Member
heliphoto's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Region 5
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,540
Jim, that's a bloody fantastic image either way! Nice work... I think I prefer the second shot, but I agree it looks a little less natural (since it is)... Old school HDR technique. I've got one of those GND 8 filters, but need to experiment with it more (or sell it - you should keep yours though )

QuoteOriginally posted by vagrant10 Quote
very interesting... I've been using a graduated filter more often lately, but these were taken with a solid nd filter? hmmm... this has me wanting to try this a bit. Thanks for sharing. And great shot(s) by the way!
I believe he used a graduated filter for this, but I'm sure he'll let us know for sure.
05-19-2009, 11:19 PM   #7
Veteran Member
roentarre's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 11,794
Definitely the second shot having that clarity and sparkling feel to it all.
05-19-2009, 11:31 PM   #8
Inactive Account




Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Melbourne
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 3,547
I like both of these shots. Obviously the sky in the second shot is alot more menacing, which i am all for, but the reflection off the water of the sky in the first shot can't be beat.

Thanks for sharing.

05-20-2009, 05:40 AM   #9
JMR
Veteran Member




Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 3,335
This does show how a split neutral density filter works. But I think there is a misunderstanding on its effects, as the filter is neutral and in no way works like HDR, which often has obvious exaggerated effects. The said filter has long been a standard with professional landscape photographers. The colours are natural but darkened so as to bring light levels more in line with the foreground levels. Only cheap ND filters will impart colours. The best on the market are Sing rays, but they cost as much as a lens!

BTW, excellent landscape.

JMR
05-20-2009, 07:07 AM   #10
Pentaxian
Jimbo's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Maple Ridge BC Canada
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 11,363
Original Poster
QuoteQuote:
very interesting... I've been using a graduated filter more often lately, but these were taken with a solid nd filter? hmmm... this has me wanting to try this a bit. Thanks for sharing. And great shot(s) by the way!
__________________
No, this is with a graduated filter. I was trying to being out a little more of the highlights in the sky while not effecting the foreground. JIM

QuoteQuote:
Dang! I can't make up my mind, buddy. The second one definitely has more "punch" but is less subtle, maybe less natural than the first one. Frankly, both look spectacular to me, so I'm no help.

Jer
That's a great help Jer. The whole idea of doing a shot like this is to make it look as natural as possible with just suttle differences. Cheers JIM

QuoteQuote:
Jim, that's a bloody fantastic image either way! Nice work... I think I prefer the second shot, but I agree it looks a little less natural (since it is)... Old school HDR technique. I've got one of those GND 8 filters, but need to experiment with it more (or sell it - you should keep yours though )


Originally Posted by vagrant10
very interesting... I've been using a graduated filter more often lately, but these were taken with a solid nd filter? hmmm... this has me wanting to try this a bit. Thanks for sharing. And great shot(s) by the way!
I believe he used a graduated filter for this, but I'm sure he'll let us know for sure.
Not a solid ND filter. It was gradulated [GND 8]. I rarely use it but when I was trying to get the exposre correct, the foreground was too dark to match the sky or the sky was to blown when exposing the foreground correctly. JIM

QuoteQuote:
Definitely the second shot having that clarity and sparkling feel to it all.
Thanks James. JIM

QuoteQuote:
I like both of these shots. Obviously the sky in the second shot is alot more menacing, which i am all for, but the reflection off the water of the sky in the first shot can't be beat.

Thanks for sharing.
Appreciate the feedback. JIM

QuoteQuote:
This does show how a split neutral density filter works. But I think there is a misunderstanding on its effects, as the filter is neutral and in no way works like HDR, which often has obvious exaggerated effects. The said filter has long been a standard with professional landscape photographers. The colours are natural but darkened so as to bring light levels more in line with the foreground levels. Only cheap ND filters will impart colours. The best on the market are Sing rays, but they cost as much as a lens!

BTW, excellent landscape.

JMR
Thanks JMR. I had been doing so many birds and wildlife shots I thought I would change it up a bit. I use a Cokin filter [about 100.00 bucks] Cheers. JIM
05-20-2009, 01:15 PM   #11
Veteran Member
heliphoto's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Region 5
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,540
QuoteOriginally posted by JMR Quote
This does show how a split neutral density filter works. But I think there is a misunderstanding on its effects, as the filter is neutral and in no way works like HDR, which often has obvious exaggerated effects. The said filter has long been a standard with professional landscape photographers. The colours are natural but darkened so as to bring light levels more in line with the foreground levels. Only cheap ND filters will impart colours. The best on the market are Sing rays, but they cost as much as a lens!

BTW, excellent landscape.

JMR
Well, JMR I think we had a misunderstanding (most likely the wrong terminology on my part)... I understand (one type of) HDR as shooting a bracketed series to get details in the highlights and shadows, and then combining portions of each frame into a whole which contains details from a wider dynamic range than the sensor is capable of capturing on it's own... Colors shouldn't be changed in this process, nor should the shot look exaggerated any more so than Jim's great shot does (I'm not refering to that tone-mapped (whatever that means) hyper-exaggerated stuff).

Here's an article on the Luminous Landscape site which directly address this process as another way to do what used to be done with GND filters.

Here's an example of three frames combined using enfuse, and while the colors are a bit saturated, that's from the "saturation" slider, not the frame combination process. Here's another, without any saturation enhancement.

Perhaps the term HDR isn't appropriate here, but it is a process to capture a larger dynamic range, so I dunno..
05-20-2009, 02:02 PM   #12
Veteran Member
AlphaGAK20D's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Alpharetta, GA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 303
Ding, ding, ding...love the 2nd...I really need to invest in some hard and soft ND filters...
05-20-2009, 08:51 PM   #13
jeffkpotter
Guest




Excellent treatment Jimbo. I love it.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
camera, filter, nd8, photo, picture, shot
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Landscape Changing Light Jimbo Post Your Photos! 4 07-12-2010 09:46 AM
Landscape Changing shot / same location Jimbo Post Your Photos! 10 01-22-2010 08:10 AM
Landscape Changing a Image Jimbo Post Your Photos! 2 11-22-2009 03:18 PM
Landscape Changing Light Jimbo Post Your Photos! 31 10-24-2009 03:04 PM
Landscape Changing Skies daacon Post Your Photos! 9 09-26-2009 01:53 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:37 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top