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01-05-2012, 11:42 AM   #1
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Indoor Studio flash setup K-5

First time posting...

I have a K-5 and I'm interested in doing some studio indoor photography.

Are all of the components in this recommended set-up compatible with the K-5? Do I need anything else to make this work? I'm just learning about studio lighting and I'm assuming this set-up triggers all of the flashes when the shutter is pressed? i.e. strobe, not continous? Also, what about directions for setting all of this up? Thanks for your help!

ePhoto lighting kit with two light stands, two brackets, 2 shoot-through umbrellas, 2 silver umbrellas, and a carrying case

Two YN560 flashes (So you can use one as a main light and one to fill in shadows. Also handy for lighting groups)

NPT-04 Cowboy Studio Wireless Flash Trigger (two receivers since you’ll have two flashes with this set-up)

24″ Softbox (I am a big fan of this softbox.

Two ePhoto 40″ Shoot-Through Umbrellas (The larger the umbrella, the softer the light)

reflector

01-05-2012, 12:54 PM   #2
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Well, yes all of that is 'compatible' if you mean it can work with the k-5. Everything you have listed is 'generic' or perhaps 'brand agnostic' is better. It is all manual and should work with any DSLR within the restrictions of the equipment.

As far as setting it all up; that can be a life time of study. Asking for simple directions to an exceedingly complex undertaking usually results in less than optimal results.

I would suggest you go to this website: Strobist Lighting 101 and work your way through the lessons. It is at least a good start and you can then determine what else you need to learn.

You will find quickly that there is an enormous and confusing variety of lighting equipment, and that it ranges in quality from really poor to really good. I would recommend the smallest kit you can do what you want with at first and add pieces as you learn. Your list has I think 6 umbrellas and a softbox on it, but you only have 2 flashes so most of that is going to just sit in the closet.
01-05-2012, 04:23 PM   #4
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Well it depends what you are shooting. People, food, flowers, ebay auctions? It should work just fine, but you will be limited to two-light setups (not counting a reflector) Here are some lighting setups that you will be able to achieve.

  • 1 key light, 1 reflector fill, 1 background light
  • 1 key light, 1 fill light, no background light
  • 1 key light, no fill (or a reflector fill), no background light
  • 1 or 2 edge lights, no key, no background (i.e. fine art lighting)
  • and you can probably get catchlights in the eyes with your pop-up flash dialed down to minimal power

The problem you will run into is lighting your background evenly with one light; it is exceedingly difficult. That may be ok, sometimes I purposely light the background unevenly to give it gradation, but you won't have a choice.

Here are some setups that you won't be able to achieve
  • High key lighting - 1 key light, 1 fill light, usually a hair light, (optional edge lights) and at least two background lights
  • Anything with a hair light (because no boom arms are included)
  • Anything with a key light, a background light, and an edge light
Also I notice that you don't have any backdrops. If you want to do "environmental portraiture" , or macro work that's ok, but if you're going for that "studio" look, I would recommend getting some seamless paper and some support stands, or suspend it from the ceiling. I don't know that white paper makes much sense in this case because of the lighting limitations, so maybe gray so that you can choose to light it, choose not to light it, light it with gels etc.


Last edited by maxfield_photo; 01-05-2012 at 04:31 PM.
01-05-2012, 05:38 PM   #5
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If I were you, I would just skip the umbrella and just get 2-3 softboxes. the umbrella is cheaper, yes, but if you want superior results (because of great control of the direction of the light) a softbox is the way to go. I have an umbrella that I used until I got my softbox and have parked it since. The umbrella spills light all over the room and the softbox (and a grid if needed) will let you place the light were you want.
Yes, I am sure that the umbrella is a good tool... but for me the only place I can see myself using it again is possibly group shots.

just an opinion, and a amateur one at that

randy
01-05-2012, 11:47 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by slip Quote
If I were you, I would just skip the umbrella and just get 2-3 softboxes. the umbrella is cheaper, yes, but if you want superior results (because of great control of the direction of the light) a softbox is the way to go. I have an umbrella that I used until I got my softbox and have parked it since. The umbrella spills light all over the room and the softbox (and a grid if needed) will let you place the light were you want.
Yes, I am sure that the umbrella is a good tool... but for me the only place I can see myself using it again is possibly group shots.

just an opinion, and a amateur one at that

randy
Your assessment is pretty spot on. Umbrellas are good because they are easy. Set a couple up, point them in the general direction of your subject, and you are going to get at least decent results. Soft boxes aren't as forgiving, but give more controlled light.
Good umbrellas actually give very good light with little spill, but you don't get good umbrellas in a 50 dollar lighting kit.
01-06-2012, 07:45 AM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Wheatfield Quote
Your assessment is pretty spot on. Umbrellas are good because they are easy. Set a couple up, point them in the general direction of your subject, and you are going to get at least decent results. Soft boxes aren't as forgiving, but give more controlled light.
Good umbrellas actually give very good light with little spill, but you don't get good umbrellas in a 50 dollar lighting kit.
Good point about the quality of umbrellas. I was amazed at the difference in the PLM system for the Alien Bees over a cheap umbrella. With the diffusion cover, the PLM also works for softbox-like use on location.

The need for a heavy stand, possibly a boom and a higher ceiling has made a good softbox less practical for me. I suspect a cheap softbox carries some of the same disadvantages of a cheap umbrella.

Last edited by GeneV; 01-06-2012 at 07:51 AM.
01-06-2012, 10:32 AM   #8
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The only advantage I can find for umbrellas is that you can pack them anywhere and set up quickly. The softboxes I have take 10 minutes each to properly set up if they have been dismantled and that is just too cumbersome for me to take along. Maybe there are models that are easier to setup but for me the softboxes stay in the studio and the umbrellas go along.

01-06-2012, 02:36 PM   #9
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fast to assemble, easy to use, great quality, amazing results for it's size, and support second to none.

Cheetah Qbox 24


cheers
01-09-2012, 08:14 PM   #10
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I've to say that a 24" softbox is very little and it will limit what you can use it with.
I'm a big fan of softlighters, easy to set up and portable, fast and cheap. It's a bit of a mix of umbrella and softbox and it gives great light.
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