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04-06-2017, 01:45 PM   #61
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QuoteOriginally posted by Pablo Villegas Quote
That's not accurate, there's no way to manually turn on HSS on the Godox AD360II flash, and the Cactus V6ii triggers it when ever you set a speed higher than normal sync on your camera. That works at least in the Canon version with a Pentax camera.
Pablo is shooting a 645D, and perhaps with a leaf shutter? My experience was with the AD360II Nikon version using a K5II and a K3II, and the flash would not switch to HSS on it's own and there is no way to switch it manually. I'm interested to know if anyone else has gotten any Pentax other than the 645D to fire an AD 360II (either Nikon or Canon) in HSS.

04-06-2017, 06:01 PM   #62
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QuoteOriginally posted by jamartinez Quote
Pablo is shooting a 645D, and perhaps with a leaf shutter? My experience was with the AD360II Nikon version using a K5II and a K3II, and the flash would not switch to HSS on it's own and there is no way to switch it manually. I'm interested to know if anyone else has gotten any Pentax other than the 645D to fire an AD 360II (either Nikon or Canon) in HSS.
No, no leaf shutter lenses. If I had leaf shutter, or if they were leaf shutter lenses for this camera I wouldn't need a Cactus V6ii.

This is the only picture I have now that proves it, it was my test of the system. You can notice the 1/400 of a second and flash fired, it's bounced at the ceiling. This was at night. I don't have any other picture right now, but I'll upload some more when I have time.

Sorry, here is the link so you can see the camera info.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/32577294@N06/29861161005/in/dateposted-public/
04-07-2017, 08:08 AM   #63
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QuoteOriginally posted by Pablo Villegas Quote
No, no leaf shutter lenses. If I had leaf shutter, or if they were leaf shutter lenses for this camera I wouldn't need a Cactus V6ii.

This is the only picture I have now that proves it, it was my test of the system. You can notice the 1/400 of a second and flash fired, it's bounced at the ceiling. This was at night. I don't have any other picture right now, but I'll upload some more when I have time.

Sorry, here is the link so you can see the camera info.
_IGP4064.jpg | Pablo Villegas | Flickr

Please don't misunderstand, Pablo, I do not doubt what you're saying. I just find it interesting that the Godox Ad360II will switch into HSS mode with a Pentax 645D but not with a K5II or a K3II, at least in my experience. These forums are a great place for people to share information on their separate experiences. I very much appreciate being able to read through and see what is working and what is not working for other folks.
04-07-2017, 08:38 AM   #64
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Hello, I see that you are talking about Cactus V6ll - did you have the opportunity to port them to an older version (V6) or someone working with both? How do they work? What time do not they do? What are they different? I have a Metz lamp with HSS dedicated to Pentax and K-1. I do not quite understand why connecting lamps to Nikon and not to Pentax, but it may be the translation of Google.


Last edited by Andrzej Makuch; 04-13-2017 at 01:13 AM.
04-07-2017, 09:58 PM   #65
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QuoteOriginally posted by jamartinez Quote
I just find it interesting that the Godox Ad360II will switch into HSS mode with a Pentax 645D but not with a K5II or a K3II, at least in my experience.
The camera model does not make a difference. The reason you had problems was because you used a Godox X1T-N trigger.

To the best of my knowledge you can make the X1T-N work on a V6II as well by taping all but the centre contacts. Only the basic 16 models appear to work on a V6II without tricks.

Also, it appears that firmware versions V1.1.008 and V1.1.007 have a bug that Cactus is currently working on. So I understand one should not use anything newer than V1.1.006 when using another trigger system in conjunction with the V6II.

Last edited by Class A; 04-07-2017 at 10:03 PM.
04-08-2017, 11:44 AM   #66
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QuoteOriginally posted by Class A Quote
The camera model does not make a difference. The reason you had problems was because you used a Godox X1T-N trigger.

To the best of my knowledge you can make the X1T-N work on a V6II as well by taping all but the centre contacts. Only the basic 16 models appear to work on a V6II without tricks.

Also, it appears that firmware versions V1.1.008 and V1.1.007 have a bug that Cactus is currently working on. So I understand one should not use anything newer than V1.1.006 when using another trigger system in conjunction with the V6II.
Thanks, A. That's good information. Although, I had seen the bit about taping off all but the center contact somewhere, so I tried that too. But it did not make a difference for me. Perhaps it was the buggy firmware in my V6II then.
04-11-2017, 09:28 AM   #67
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I did some quick tests the other day, and it just works, Settings on the Cactus V6ii are Flash Canon, HSS normal, camera Pentax. And the Xt1-C is set to manual. Camera set to manual, once you go beyond 1/125 of a second, it will trigger the flash in HSS, it will also limit the power, once you're at 1/125 you get a lot more power like more than 1 stop, your flash exposure shouldn't be changing with the shutter speed, but it does, you need to close between 1-2 stops. Don't know if it's true HSS. But it does fire and synchronizes past 1/125 of a second.
04-11-2017, 09:42 AM   #68
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QuoteOriginally posted by Pablo Villegas Quote
...your flash exposure shouldn't be changing with the shutter speed, but it does...
What exactly do you mean?

If you mean a general change of flash exposure while you keep increasing the shutter speed (once you are beyond the sync-speed), that's normal. Independently of whether you are getting true HSS-light (similar to continuous light) or single long flash pulses, the flash exposure will decrease when the shutter speed increases. That's just the nature of focal plane shutters.

If you mean the transitioning from regular triggering (shutter speeds not exceeding the sync-speed) to high-speed triggering (shutter speeds exceeding the sync-speed) that should normally be smooth. I did not notice big jumps when using HSS, but I did not measure the transition either.

Note, however, that if you are driving your flashes using the Hyper-Sync technique then you'll automatically get full power, once you exceed the sync-speed. A full power blast is the only way most (non-HSS) flashes can provide an illumination duration that is long enough, so the V6II automatically switches to full power in that case.

Shouldn't happen, though, if you are using the "normal" HSS mode of the V6II.

04-12-2017, 09:03 PM   #69
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QuoteOriginally posted by Class A Quote
What exactly do you mean?

If you mean a general change of flash exposure while you keep increasing the shutter speed (once you are beyond the sync-speed), that's normal. Independently of whether you are getting true HSS-light (similar to continuous light) or single long flash pulses, the flash exposure will decrease when the shutter speed increases. That's just the nature of focal plane shutters.

If you mean the transitioning from regular triggering (shutter speeds not exceeding the sync-speed) to high-speed triggering (shutter speeds exceeding the sync-speed) that should normally be smooth. I did not notice big jumps when using HSS, but I did not measure the transition either.

Note, however, that if you are driving your flashes using the Hyper-Sync technique then you'll automatically get full power, once you exceed the sync-speed. A full power blast is the only way most (non-HSS) flashes can provide an illumination duration that is long enough, so the V6II automatically switches to full power in that case.

Shouldn't happen, though, if you are using the "normal" HSS mode of the V6II.
I don't see why the flash output will vary with shorter shutter speeds, unless you get to a faster speed than the flash duration, which will prevent the flash to fully expose the frame.

But is not only about that, I mean from 1/125 to 1/400 there shouldn't be any change at all in exposure with normal flash output. The flash is doing something to limit the power in HSS mode, because you can hear it as well, the pop from 1/125 is a lot louder than from 1/400. And the image is more than 1 stop overexposed.
04-13-2017, 01:15 AM - 1 Like   #70
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Flash exposure is a component of 'shutter speed' for HSS (and hypersync) operations, as ClassA said. So aperture, ISO, Time Value, distance and flash head zoom changes all require compensating adjustments to manual flash power to maintain a fixed flash exposure level.

The shutter speed aspect is because the 'moving slit' between the 2 shutter blades gets narrower with each shorter exposure time, therefore less light can pass through in the time available.
04-13-2017, 01:21 AM   #71
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And one more question - do you see any advantage with powersync over HSS?
Will the 1 / 2000s take more light from the lamp at powersync or HSS?
04-13-2017, 07:55 AM   #72
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QuoteOriginally posted by Pablo Villegas Quote
But is not only about that, I mean from 1/125 to 1/400 there shouldn't be any change at all in exposure with normal flash outpu
Your expectation is incorrect. I hope mcgregni's explanation already makes sense to you. Only if an automated exposure system actively compensates for higher shutter speeds (by amping up the flash output) then you won't notice a decrease in flash exposure. The natural effect is for the flash exposure to decrease by one stop with each stop of shutter speed increase. Not the fault of the flash or triggering; just the fact that a lot more light just hits the shutter blades (as the open slit gets smaller and smaller).

Last edited by Class A; 04-23-2017 at 03:47 AM.
04-13-2017, 07:58 AM   #73
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QuoteOriginally posted by Andrzej Makuch Quote
And one more question - do you see any advantage with powersync over HSS?
It is a trade-off.

PS will give you more flash power at the expense of smoothness of exposure. An HSS-burst must distribute the energy evenly over a long burst (with some safety margins at the front and end) to achieve an even exposure. With PS, you'll get the unmitigated flash output but that also means that the flash exposure will effectively produce a gradient. The latter can not be a problem at all or be pretty visible, depending on the application.
04-13-2017, 08:04 PM   #74
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QuoteOriginally posted by Class A Quote
Your expectation is incorrect. I hope mcgregni's explanation already makes sense to you. Only if an automated exposure system actively compensates for higher shutter speeds (by amping up the flash output) then you won't notice a decrease in flash exposure. The natural effect is for the flash exposure to decrease by one stop with each stop of shutter speed increase. Not that fault of the flash or triggering; just that the fact that a lot more light just hits the shutter blades (as the open slit gets smaller and smaller).
Don't know how HSS or hypersync work, but shutter speed on normal flash does not affects flash exposure. Unless, like I said before, your shutter speed is faster than the flash duration, not my case with 1/400.
It doesn't matter that the slit gets smaller and smaller, it still gets whatever the shutter speed is of time or exposure(light), so, as long as the flash fully triggers in less than that time, it should fully expose the sensor or film just as much as in any slower shutter speed.

And like I said, is not only the exposure that changes, it's the flash output, as you can clearly hear the flash sound louder at sync speed or below. So, HSS in this setup must be limiting the flash output.

PS: after reading how HSS works, it does need to limit the flash power, since it emits extremely fast pulses of light, so it cannot be full power, or it wouldn't keep up with the speed.
When using HSS with my setup, the flash exposure doesn't change when increasing the shutter speed, at least not from 1/200 to 1/1000 the fastest I could test it today, it only changes when going to 1/125, because it allows the flash to trigger at full power, slower than 1/125 doesn't change the flash exposure from 1/125 as well,

Last edited by Pablo Villegas; 04-13-2017 at 08:30 PM.
04-14-2017, 12:49 AM - 1 Like   #75
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Its not really about the length of any single flash burst, more about the physical barrier that is the moving shutter. At any time value up to and including the 'max sync speed', a single burst of flash can occur and illuminate the whole frame through the completely open shutter. Any adjustments to the exposure time that keep the shutter open longer make no difference to the flash exposure in that situation.


Once past the max sync speed, then the shutter is never fully open at any point, but instead is this 'moving slit' that passes a strip of light across the sensor. The HSS continuous bursts of light provide a continuous light source that 'powers through' this moving slit to expose each part of the sensor equally as it moves across.


However, whilst there is an open 'slit' for the light to pass through, there is also an area of black closed shutter preventing light from hitting the sensor ... this area of black shutter blocking the sensor increases with each decrease in time value (1/400th - 1/800th - 1/2000th etc) as the slit gets narrower. Therefore there is less space for the light to get through in the time available. So to compensate you need more light, stronger light, to be forced through the smaller opening in order to maintain the same flash exposure level. This is why the power needs to be increased to maintain a fixed level of exposure for each progressive shorter exposure time.
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