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Weekly Challenge 312 "History"
Posted By: StephenHampshire, 01-23-2015, 02:50 PM

It falls upon me to set the next weekly challenge. Here in the UK we are currently celebrating 800 years since the signing of Magna Carta, and also 50 years since the death of Winston Churchill.....so I thought that I would choose "History" as this weeks challenge....


Some ideas could be historical buildings, old objects, books, even fake historical figures....here are a few from me to set the scene









The fine print:

The Challenge will run until midnight next Friday January 30th 2015, whichever time zone you are in.


Every week, a new theme is picked and judged by the winner of the previous week.

Rules
1. Post ONE photo (max 1024x1024).
2. The photo must portray an interpretation of the theme.
3. Post your single picture in this thread and explain what motivated you to take the picture and/or how you feel it represents the weekly theme (especially if it's not obvious).
4. The challenge is interactive. Any response is welcome.
5. The judge will pick the WINNERS and choose one of them to be the judge for the next week.
6. This challenge runs for 7 days plus an additional day for the judge to choose the winners.
7. Any Pentax (or Samsung DSLR) camera can be used.
8. Pictures can be from any time frame, not just within the week of the current theme.
9. In case the winner of a challenge is unable to become the judge for the next challenge, they will PM the #2 winner for that person to be the judge.




Read more at: https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/129-weekly-photo-challenges/275769-weekly...#ixzz3PgKuXzKX

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01-23-2015, 04:05 PM - 1 Like   #2
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Johannes Gutenberg (c. 1398 – February 3, 1468) was a German blacksmith, goldsmith, printer, and publisher who introduced printing to Europe. His invention of mechanical movable type printing started the Printing Revolution and is widely regarded as the most important event of the modern period. It played a key role in the development of the Renaissance, Reformation, the Age of Enlightenment, and the Scientific revolution and laid the material basis for the modern knowledge-based economy and the spread of learning to the masses. - Wikipedia.

The "Gutenberg Bible" was the first substantial book printed with movable type in the West. Printed about 1450-55 in Mainz, Germany, the Bible is in Latin, in the standard medieval Catholic version known as the Vulgate. Only the text, in type called black letter, or gothic, was printed with movable type. The Huntington copy is one of eleven surviving copies printed on vellum, and one of three such copies in the United States. An additional thirty-six copies printed on paper also survive. - The Huntington.

Last edited by SpecialK; 01-23-2015 at 11:28 PM.
01-23-2015, 07:10 PM - 3 Likes   #3
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I love history so this is a very hard topic, there is so much to choose from, but a lot of the photos are not exciting, they have a hard time actually conveying the history, they are more thought provoking. I narrowed it down to a photo of a nearby cemetery at a site of a War of 1812 fort, where these soldiers all died of disease, which was far more prevalent in those days than dying in battle. That was probably the best photo but the photo didn't tell the story. Next I thought of a little later part of American History, the canals. In the early 1800s canal building was a big thing in Ohio, and many other parts of the US. -There was a huge westward expansion through mostly unsettled forest lands. Roads were rough, and it was found to be a lot easier to travel down navigable rivers. Then they decided to build canals between the rivers and the lakes. These canals were amazing for their time, that they could build these canals in rough lands with the tools of the time. Some of the great engineering feats of the time were the locks which navigated elevation changes and the aqueducts that crossed streams. I also thought about the Air Force Museum in Dayton, the finest aviation museum in the world. I love going there, it's so well done and they are so camera friendly, but every display has it's own history it's hard to pick one.

I decided to go with architecture, the Art-Deco styled 47 story building in Columbus, Ohio now known as the LeVeque Tower. The building was started in 1924 and completed in 1927, at the time, the world's 5th tallest building.The 1920s were a great time for opulent building due to the prosperity of the times, which would not last. After the great depression of the 1930s and World War II, it seems society has mostlt forgotten how to build buidings with such style (with some exceptions). The details of these buildings themselves show proud history, beauty, and strength. This photo of course is just a section near the top of the tower (taken from another building a block away)
01-23-2015, 09:05 PM - 1 Like   #4
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Moon over Mesa Verde's Cliff Palace, ruins of a once thriving civilization that just packed up and left their wonderful village one day.



01-23-2015, 11:29 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by MadMathMind Quote
Moon over Mesa Verde's Cliff Palace, ruins of a once thriving civilization that just packed up and left their wonderful village one day.
Very similar to the "Whitehouse" ruins at Canyon de Chelly, Arizona.
01-24-2015, 12:30 AM   #6
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01-24-2015, 01:23 AM - 1 Like   #7
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Let there be light

From the Monastery Church in Varnhem, Sweden. Built in 1150.

01-24-2015, 06:05 AM - 1 Like   #8
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Carriage Hill MetroPark - 200+ year old, working historical farm.



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01-24-2015, 07:14 AM   #9
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Represented here are millions years of earth history. This is the Chippewa Bay Roadcut in northern New York, and is being described by a geology professor on a field trip. This photo is from a decades-old Kodachrome 64 transparency, digitized by the roundabout method of photographing it with a close-up converter. So I guess the photo itself represents a slice of history.

Millions of Years of Earth History

01-24-2015, 07:49 AM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by SpecialK Quote
Very similar to the "Whitehouse" ruins at Canyon de Chelly, Arizona.
Yes, but much much, much larger. This is just a small piece. It's not possible to catch the moon and the entire dwelling without a DA15, and even that might not do it. The only vantage point you can catch the whole thing from is relatively close (and I know 18mm won't get far enough above the mesa top to get the moon). The far view from across the park isn't very good because the structure is covered in shadows and is tilted away from you.

This photo was taken from the ground level as part of a special evening "character" tour.
01-24-2015, 09:27 AM   #11
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Working History - A reclaimed and renovated miners' cabin repurposed to house backcountry skiers and snowshoers in the Bonnington Range, South of Nelson, B.C.

01-24-2015, 10:57 AM - 2 Likes   #12
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A rare historical find.

This has been passed down to my wife. In the 1930's her grandfather found this Indian axe in his backyard here in Saugus Ma. on the banks of the Saugus River. The Indians had camps along the river where they did their fishing and hunting. An expert told me that it probably dates back to the Archaic Age to maybe 4000 years ago and was most likely a tool instead of a weapon. I wish that when I hold it I could get a vibe or vision of who may have held this many many years ago but that is just wishful thinking on my part. A funny aside to this story is that my wife's mother was using this artifact as a door stop years ago before it was given to her.--charliezap
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01-24-2015, 11:00 AM   #13
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some really intereting photos coming in...I will have to balance artistic content against historical interest I think!
01-24-2015, 11:06 AM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by charliezap Quote
This has been passed down to my wife. In the 1930's her grandfather found this Indian axe in his backyard here in Saugus Ma. on the banks of the Saugus River. The Indians had camps along the river where they did their fishing and hunting. An expert told me that it probably dates back to the Archaic Age to maybe 4000 years ago and was most likely a tool instead of a weapon. I wish that when I hold it I could get a vibe or vision of who may have held this many many years ago but that is just wishful thinking on my part. A funny aside to this story is that my wife's mother was using this artifact as a door stop years ago before it was given to her.--charliezap
Here is an article about it that was done several years ago. It is interesting reading.
Ancient Axe Used as Doorstop
01-24-2015, 11:13 AM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by charliezap Quote
Here is an article about it that was done several years ago. It is interesting reading.
Ancient Axe Used as Doorstop
Interesting read Charlie, thanks for posting!
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