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04-12-2013, 02:06 AM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by Jewelry Designer Quote
As far as the clone spot healing tools in PP, where is it located
On the tool bar on the right hand side, where you select your brushes, cropping and all that stuff, on CS6 its about six or seven down.

Remove the that UV filter and a fit a hood (it can't hurt any) and try again.

04-13-2013, 03:36 PM   #17
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Hi kerrowdown
Thanks, I know where the stamp tool is on my 5.5 version, and did use it on those earrings photos. Coming down with a bug, virus, or cold, so might have to wait to go downtown, to get lens hoods for both my lenses. Didn't know I have to remove the UV filter, to screw in the lens hood. If I use a lens hood for my zoom lens, and 100mm IS macro, would I only use it for the gradient black background, or for all backgrounds, to stop lens flare? Didn't have so much trouble with light, using the display neck for earrings. I'll post a photo I took with t4i using display neck.
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04-13-2013, 10:28 PM   #18
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Hey guys looked in the box my macro lens came in, found they actually gave me a lens hood. Could not believe it, now I only have to get one for the zoom lens, not surprised they didn't include one with the camera kit as, they didn't give me a memory card. Heck I got one with my G2, oh well, thanks for all the help.
04-14-2013, 04:41 AM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by Jewelry Designer Quote
Didn't know I have to remove the UV filter, to screw in the lens hood
You don't, but I'm thinking the UV filter might be the cause of the lens flare your experiencing so take it off and try, the hood may just help, I can't hurt in this situation.

04-16-2013, 09:25 PM   #20
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Hi kerrowdown
You guys are right, lens hood got rid of the lens flare. Can't buy new lights right now, but, I do feel I need more light. I took the diffuser cover of the light, and that did help bring more light from the top. I'm posting some photos, let me know what you think.
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04-17-2013, 09:09 AM   #21
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Looks like the bottoms are OOF. You either need to decrease the aperture (higher number) or make sure the camera is in exact plane of the subject. It looks to me that you are shooting down a bit and that is causing the top of the piece to be slightly closer to the camera than the bottom.
04-17-2013, 02:25 PM   #22
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Hi jatrax
What do you mean by OOF? It's hard to get the whole earrings in, unless I turn the camera vertically. When I tried that, even with IS and self timer, there will be camera shake, holding the camera without tripod. So I usually put camera on tripod horizontally, I set aperture at f/11 should I go to 13 or 16 then. I had to shoot down a bit to get all of the earrings in the photo, or the bottom would be cut off. I'm also setting my ISO to industry standard 100, should I go to 400 ISO? My side lights are old Bowens tri-lite with three 30 watt bulbs in each light. I added an overhead light with 30 watt bulb.
04-17-2013, 03:17 PM   #23
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OOF = out of focus. Quite noticeably, and for a product shot unacceptable.

Your earrings are hanging vertically so the focal plane should match that exactly. The camera must be perfectly level.

ISO 100 is just fine. Lighting is fine. Aperture at f/11 should be fine, you could go a little higher depending on your lens, I use f/13 with my k-5 and macro lens most of the time. But f/11 is just fine because the earrings are not very deep, you just have to line it up so the focal plane is precisely aligned with the earrings. And you have to understand what DOF is.

In this case, you are on a tripod, right? So turn the camera vertical on the tripod and level the camera so it is perfectly level using a bubble level or whatever you have. Then raise or lower the tripod to get the image you want.

To understand DOF, (depth of focus) go here: Online Depth of Field Calculator Plug in your numbers and you will see how much of the subject should be in focus. I think you will be surprised how little room to play with you have.

04-17-2013, 09:29 PM   #24
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jatrax
Can't seem to get the camera on tripod vertically right, camera seems too heavy tips over allot, so having to hold it in my hands. Sorry I've not had any classes in digital photography or product photography. Was Art major in college, did take photography in art department, black and white with my AE1 but that was 1979 to 81. I did go to f/13 like you suggested. Here are some of the photos.
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04-17-2013, 09:35 PM   #25
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Thinking when I get a lens hood for my zoom lens, going to try using that to photograph earrings. Maybe my 100 mm macro IS lens is just too close, with zoom I wouldn't have to zoom in so much, and could have it on tripod horizontally. Just a thought, my tripod is not working for the dslr like my G2
04-17-2013, 09:42 PM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by Jewelry Designer Quote
Just a thought, my tripod is not working for the dslr like my G2
Well in vertical you will get more pixels but depending on the use maybe that does not matter. They do look a bit better can you tell the difference?

If your tripod is not holding your camera properly maybe you need a stronger tripod? What model do you have?
04-17-2013, 10:27 PM   #27
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Jatrax
Thanks for saying they look better, that does help. I'm not sure what kind it is as, it belonged to my fiance when he was alive, he loaned it to me, he used it for his video camera. I think too the lens hood makes the camera top heavy too, was thinking maybe I should eventually get a 60 mm macro lens but the canon ones are not IS only their 100 is. I'll take a look at it but I don't see anything stamped on it. Some of the photos I didn't work in photo shop as the bottom would have been cut off in sizing, and some were a little bit out of focus too. Hey but at least I got rid of the lens flair lol, that's something. I put the stand I made to hang the earrings on, on a couple of boxes to raise it up in the cocoon, so I didn't have to tilt the camera down so much. Posting two photos, untouched in photo shop so you can see what they look like. You can see the red earrings are not in focus, I did have photo that was but, ear wires got cut off. The second photo is better but bottom will get cut off in sizing.
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04-18-2013, 02:42 AM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by Jewelry Designer Quote
Hi Guys
Just took some earrings photos, using the studio gray background paper. I don't think I have enough light, that's for sure, not sure about background either. I used my 100mm macro lens at f/11 ISO 100 +1 exposure compensation. Maybe I should up the ISO to 400, but, I know industry standard is 100
These are, or should be, static non-moving objects. Amount of light and shutter speed will have little effect on the final image. You should technically be able to create a well lit photo with a single candle if you wanted to, and if you had the time.

Your lights are fine. Just make use a longer shutter speed.
A few seconds with the shutter speed should not cause enough noise that it becomes worthwhile to up the ISO - which will definitely cause much more noise.

Of course, if you're making money at this and you can save enough time to make the purchase of better lights worthwhile, by all means do so.


FYI, you might also want to check out this website.
The guy can be a bit hard to understand until you get used to his accent, but he's really quite the genius with figuring out lighting and DIY lighting modifiers to get really good product photos. Some of his videos and tips are for free, some are not.
Photigy: technically advanced photography
04-18-2013, 08:22 AM   #29
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I would use manual mode for this (including manual white balance). This way, once you've set the exposure for the jewelry you can swap pieces out and still keep the results consistent for processing later. If your backdrop is lit independently from the jewelry, you can also easily switch from white to black (or other) without having to reset the exposure.

A sturdier tripod or other way to lock down the camera would be a much better investment than new lights. A sturdy tripod is also preferable to me over any form of image stabilization for studio use.

Unless space becomes a limitation and you need to have the camera in too close making a shorter focal length necessary, I would stick to your macro over the zoom. The macro is made for stuff like this.

If you are after a gradient background, one way to do this is to use a white background and 'feather' the background light. See the diagram in the comments of Shooting macro on a white background: simple yet very useful tricks (amoringello linked to this website).

You might try getting a hold of the book "Light Science and Magic: An Introduction to Photographic Lighting". It's a great resource for learning how and why to use various lighting setups.

Your last two photos (post #27) look to suffering from camera shake more than being out of focus. What kind of shutter speeds are you getting here? I think the need for a sturdy tripod can't be overstated
04-18-2013, 07:58 PM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by Jewelry Designer Quote
was thinking maybe I should eventually get a 60 mm macro lens but the canon ones are not IS only their 100 is.
You don't need a new lens.
You don't need IS in any lens.
You are doing static product shots. What you need for this is a good solid tripod, even lighting, a good background, and a good understanding of the basics of photography. The camera and lens you already have are MORE than good enough.

If you want to spend money please go out and get a GOOD tripod, not a piece of junk from Best Buy, but a GOOD solid tripod and ball head. The tripod you have is most likely fine for a small video camera it is not good enough for what you are doing. You can continue to struggle and ask questions but the bottom line is nothing we can tell you is going to do a bit of good until you get the basics down. And the number one basic principle of product shots is a rock solid tripod that allows you to position the camera anywhere you want. You should not have to move your product "up into the canopy" to get the shot, that is what the tripod is for.

The last two shots are both OOF, not usable for sales. I'm not sure if you said where you were selling but I assume online? I have an Etsy shop and sell wood turnings, pens, rolling pins and whatnot. So I know product shots. They must be well lit and tack sharp. Were these on the tripod or handheld? Are you using a timer, a remote or the shutter button? You should not be touching the camera when the photo is taken. Are you focusing manually or with the auto-focus? I find for shots like this that manual focus is better. And as someone noted above your goal should be to get a setup that then you do not change as you swap items in and out.

How far away from the earrings is the camera? Please measure exactly with a ruler or tape measure. Something is not right, with a tripod and a macro lens and a subject that is at most 1 inch deep you should be getting perfect shots without even trying.
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