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01-21-2014, 02:06 PM   #1
TzalamChadash
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About to get my first ICL camera

Basically decided on the Pentax k-50
Always used point and shoot. First film. Then digital. Latest camera was a compact super zoom.
I decided that it is time to upgrade to a serious camera and learn some photography. My wife sort of as a joke told me to get Ricoh as my old point and shoot film camera was a Ricoh. It was a workhorse that lasted over 15 years!
I started looking into things - considered mirrorless m4/3 and Apsc - also large sensor fixed lens - and realized that Pentax DSLR really had what I was looking for - excellent durable build cameras that I can use on hikes, by the pool or beach or around the kids without worrying about water, sand, etc. and economical to boot! And have the ability to gta good zoom picture for those school events when I sit far away from where our kids are putting on the show.

Seems like the k-50 is a good place to start. I will probably go with the two WR kit lenses (18-55 and 50-200) as it seemed mst economical and take it from there.
I like the fact that the k-50 apparently has a nice suite of automatic settings to help with the learning curve.
I think that the only issue still nagging me is the fact that it has a plastic body as opposed to metal.
Should this make a difference in my selection process? I live in a hot country so heat is an issue and it's my understanding that the polycarbonate is better in this respect than magnesium alloy or metal.
Will the reinforced polycarbonate fare that much worse than the magnesium alloy if kids- say- drop the camera?
This forum has been REALLY helpful and I've read a lot of stuff here in getting to the decision on Pentax. I imagine that I will join properly at so e point.
Tx!!

01-21-2014, 02:19 PM   #2
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I have a K-30 (almost the same as a K-50), and it is much less "plasticky" than similarly priced Nikon/Canon cameras. Very rigid chassis, able to withstand reasonable stresses. The Magnesium bodies are better, but the K-50 is better for a first camera because of the features. Ir is plenty durable. Hiking, canoeing etc completely doable.
01-21-2014, 02:22 PM   #3
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Good choice of camera. Now all you have to do is become a member of the Forum to keep learning about your new camera!
01-21-2014, 02:26 PM   #4
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I think it's just the exterior that's polycarbonate, which is pretty shock resistant. The camera still has the Pentax standard skeleton. I know people have put the K30 through its paces, so the K50 should be at least as good.

I would suggest a sling-type camera strap, which goes over the neck/shoulder like a sash - this is much more secure than a shoulder strap.
I have a different one, but this is the type of strap I'm talking about:
http://joby.com/camera-straps/ultrafit-sling-strap-for-men/

I'd consider the 18-135 as well, but the two lens kit is not a bad starting point. Either the 2-lens or the 18-135, not both.

I have a K5 and with the 18-135 have never had issues with water or heat. Cold generally no problem if the battery is full, but if it's below half it loses its mojo pretty quickly when below around 15F.

01-21-2014, 02:34 PM   #5
TzalamChadash
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Thanks!

I'm certain I will join up once I have the camera. A relative will be bringing it over in a few weeks.
Was toying with the idea of splurging all out on a k-3 but it seemed to me to make sense to just start with the basics and save the extra money for lenses or a future body upgrade or a simple durable walkabout camera - or upgrade my smartphone to the Sony experia z1 which has a decent sensor and can survive a trip into the kids bath :-)
01-21-2014, 02:40 PM   #6
TzalamChadash
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Appreciate the tip about the sling

Never thought of that.

Still wrestling with the 18-135 vs the two kit lenses.

Leaning towards the two lenses as economics seem to make more sense as it comes out to about $150-200 less than the actual costs of those two lenses separately and the 18-135 will be about $200 more for the package.
I also imagine that early on just taking pictures of kids around house and on vacation and such I'd probably prefer to walk around with a more compact lens - and can swap over to the zoom kit lens for the school play stuff.
01-21-2014, 03:05 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by TzalamChadash Quote
Never thought of that.

Still wrestling with the 18-135 vs the two kit lenses.

Leaning towards the two lenses as economics seem to make more sense as it comes out to about $150-200 less than the actual costs of those two lenses separately and the 18-135 will be about $200 more for the package.
I also imagine that early on just taking pictures of kids around house and on vacation and such I'd probably prefer to walk around with a more compact lens - and can swap over to the zoom kit lens for the school play stuff.
The 18-135 is not much bigger than the kit lens, and the advantage is not having to swap lenses if you need something a bit longer than 50mm.
The 18-135 can be used all day in any situation, it is my go-to lens for family events and outings.
My advice would be to get the 18-135 now if it is in the budget, then later get the 55-300WR for those school sports events.
01-21-2014, 05:59 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by crewl1 Quote
The 18-135 is not much bigger than the kit lens, and the advantage is not having to swap lenses if you need something a bit longer than 50mm.
The 18-135 can be used all day in any situation, it is my go-to lens for family events and outings.
My advice would be to get the 18-135 now if it is in the budget, then later get the 55-300WR for those school sports events.
I'd second Larry on the 18-135 and 55-300 WR. If you get the 18-55/50-200 make sure they're WR for the outdoor usage. Enjoy!

01-22-2014, 01:19 AM   #9
TzalamChadash
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the economics of the kit lens choice

I'll be getting the camera via B&H.
I hear what you are saying about the 18-135 vs. the 2 other kit lenses, but I don't really get the economics of that choice
the B&H two kits lens package is $796 - both lenses 18-55 and 50-200 are WR. Combined they would cost seprately around $450. the body is around $620 - so they are effectively selling these two lenses for around $180 which is less than half price

the kits with 18-135 is also WR and costs around $1,020. the lens by itself costs $497, so the kits comes out to around $100 off the lens which is 20% of the lens. aside from having to pay $225 more for this kit, it seems to make sense to get the better discount on the two kits lenses and save the $225 towards another lens in the future - even a new/used all-in-one of one type of another.

does the above make sense?
01-22-2014, 06:33 AM   #10
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Certainly it makes sense, and the two kit lenses aren't bad. The 18-135 has really developed a following, though, as a standard walkaround lens for its versatility and its quick focus thanks to the DC motorized focus. I think a lot of people upgraded from the 18-55 kit lens to the 18-135. A common kit now is 18-135 and 55-300. This is definitely more expensive than the box kit - so the decision is yours. The 18-55 is pretty well regarded, among kit lenses from all manufacturers.

You will want to get lens hoods if the kit does not come with them. Not only do they help prevent flare and reflections, but protect the front element from scratches. You can get aftermarket hoods, you'll find some threads here about those sources.
01-22-2014, 09:57 PM   #11
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Check out the reviews, with handy info like used sale prices etc. in the DA Zoom lens review section

IMO the 18-135 WR is a good lens, very sharp and desirable so it will hold its value. The 18-55 is a sharp lens pretty good pseudo macro 1:3(1/3 life size) much better than canon or nikon kit lenses(maybe not the canon STM) I use mine still. I can't say I ever cared for the 50-200, but I've seen some people take quite good images with it.

The 55-300 is fantastic(I had HD WR version) Damaged it in a fall, but really the K30 is TOUGH even the lens just the zoom heliocoil is wonky everything else is fine. Hard fall right on the lens I'm a heavy guy.
01-23-2014, 03:03 AM   #12
TzalamChadash
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thank you

Thanks for the further info.
My "delivery messenger" (i.e. relative coming to visit) is traveling at beginning of March.
So I will wait through President's Day to see what/if any sales happen and then decide on lens(es).

Pretty set on Pentax - and the k-50 - though.
Was keeping any eye out on the Fuji mirrorless situation and a WR body, but it seems to me that the new body coming out next week will be way too expensive for what I need/want, and I don't think it will give me any real advantages over taking up some more serious photography via the Pentax world. At the end of the day that money saved can go to more lenses - and a body upgrade down the line
02-11-2014, 10:14 PM   #13
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you cant go wrong with that camera
02-14-2014, 10:31 AM   #14
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Any one of these kit lenses will do you well - you'll find that it's your go-to for walking around.

I'm a strong proponent of a two-lens kit:
1. The kit lens 18-55 is lightweight and flexible for walking around and traveling.\
2. A fast prime like a Sigma 30mm f1.4 or the Pentax equivalent - a 30-35mm with max aperture f1.4-1.8 is perfect for the APS-C sensor.

You may find yourself enjoying the prime more than anything else, since you're bound to a single focal length (forced to frame your picture, and get closer) and the low-light capabilities are wonderful for indoors and in the evenings. Also the wide aperture is wonderful for portraits.
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