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10-07-2019, 07:43 AM - 1 Like   #31
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QuoteOriginally posted by Sandy Hancock Quote

For my own part, the time I put into learning my day job (nearly killing people I have just met with potentially lethal doses of dangerous drugs and then stopping them from dying while someone else nearly kills them with sharp instruments)
Anesthesiologist?

10-07-2019, 08:48 AM - 1 Like   #32
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QuoteOriginally posted by Sandy Hancock Quote

For my own part, the time I put into learning my day job (nearly killing people I have just met with potentially lethal doses of dangerous drugs and then stopping them from dying while someone else nearly kills them with sharp instruments) was worth every minute, and remains a source of both joy and financial security. I will never put in the time to develop my photography skills to that level, so I'll remain a happily incompetent amateur.
Hah, in Aus 90% of the wildlife can kill you, just with casual contact, so I'd say you have your hands full keeping people alive
10-09-2019, 05:05 AM   #33
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I don't make a living from photography but I have done a couple of small paid jobs in the past when asked. More as a favour than anything else to be fair.
10-13-2019, 08:46 PM   #34
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Engineer in the automotive sector, but in my previous life I designed a couple of cameras for a small startup.
I enjoy taking pictures and have received some tips for doing so, but it remains a hobby.

But I'm seriously addicted to collecting cameras. Too many of them

10-14-2019, 05:04 PM   #35
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It's a hobby for me. I've not tried to sell anything, but enjoy expressing myself through photography and learning how to do it better.
10-16-2019, 10:54 AM   #36
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wow

Sounds like majority, if not all of you are amateurs, very, very talented and dedicated amateurs.
Thank's for your inputs.
10-17-2019, 02:44 AM - 3 Likes   #37
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I have this theory (Robin prepares himself for a hail of indignant retorts ), that when you turn 'Pro' your customers start dictating what you photograph, while when you turn 'Artist' you offer what you like to photograph for public consumption. As an amateur you do what you enjoy, and gratefully accept any praise that comes your way!
10-18-2019, 08:28 PM   #38
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Robin makes a good point. When I was doing wedding photography, I was supposed to provide certain shots--and woe to me if I didn't come through. I was fortunate in not having to deal with any bridezillas or mothers-of-the-bride-from-hell, but I still had expectations to meet. For my own photography, I go where my muse takes me (even though that muse is not the most reliable guide). I just don't expect any sort of payday as a result.

10-30-2019, 05:35 PM   #39
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QuoteOriginally posted by jouzhawhen Quote
What percentage of members make their living in photo related field?
I'm a student so sell postcards to scrape together money. Not a lot of money in postcards though.
12-06-2019, 08:44 PM   #40
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My day job involves keeping a close eye on engineers and trying to make sure their designs don't kill or main anyone. For me photography is a hobby that allows me to create images that I like, part artistic license and part technical exercise in getting the image just how I want it.

I considered doing photography as a job for a very short time, but as others have said before me that would take the fun out of it. My day job is bounded by expectations by my customers, my photography is bounded by what I feel like at the time. If anyone else likes it then that's a bonus.
12-07-2019, 12:57 PM - 1 Like   #41
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QuoteOriginally posted by ecostigny Quote
Robin makes a good point. When I was doing wedding photography, I was supposed to provide certain shots--and woe to me if I didn't come through. I was fortunate in not having to deal with any bridezillas or mothers-of-the-bride-from-hell, but I still had expectations to meet. For my own photography, I go where my muse takes me (even though that muse is not the most reliable guide). I just don't expect any sort of payday as a result.
I feel the same way. When I used to do wedding photography, it felt like work in that I had hard and fast expectations for my output. Photography as a hobby is a lot more relaxing.

---------- Post added 12-07-19 at 02:58 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Liney Quote
My day job involves keeping a close eye on engineers and trying to make sure their designs don't kill or main anyone. For me photography is a hobby that allows me to create images that I like, part artistic license and part technical exercise in getting the image just how I want it.

I considered doing photography as a job for a very short time, but as others have said before me that would take the fun out of it. My day job is bounded by expectations by my customers, my photography is bounded by what I feel like at the time. If anyone else likes it then that's a bonus.
My day job also involves keeping a close eye on what the software engineers produce and ensuring that it's something that customers are willing to pay good money for. The pressure to ensure that no bugs slip through to the field is pretty high.
12-07-2019, 01:02 PM   #42
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My day job has the title of "software engineer" attached to it. Photography is just a hobby. I have made a little money here and there but it has been quite some time since the last paid job.
12-07-2019, 02:28 PM   #43
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QuoteOriginally posted by ecostigny Quote
My day job also involves keeping a close eye on what the software engineers produce and ensuring that it's something that customers are willing to pay good money for. The pressure to ensure that no bugs slip through to the field is pretty high.
It is one of the major factors in engineering that can lead to mental health issues, particularly with those who, to put it crudely, "give a damn" about a quality product.

I did a personality test for work (I think I was applying for a new job and everyone had to do it} and one of the questions was around whether you feel guilt when something goes wrong, even though you had nothing to do with it. I ticked 'yes' because I always have that nagging feeling after the event that "I should have thought of that" or "I should have mentioned it and someone would have checked it".

It's a personality trait that makes great products, but only if everyone thinks the same way. As soon as you get one or two who don't get it, the burden is then shared by the rest. If you happen to be the only one.....
12-07-2019, 06:39 PM - 1 Like   #44
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QuoteOriginally posted by ecostigny Quote
The pressure to ensure that no bugs slip through to the field is pretty high.
Code always has its quirks, just when you squash one bug the code unravels to unleash several more. Your ideal of no bugs is laudable, however there are undoubtedly some small ones that will crop up. Especially if you are coding for consumer PCs* where hardware can vary drastically from platform to platform.

* corporate systems generally are more homogeneous, though in medical and metal fabrication systems can be very outdated due to control software's OS incompatabilities*.



*though when coding for platforms with an obsolete/mature OS you can see the biggest vulnerabilities coming. With cutting edge software, vulnerabilities seemingly pop out of nowhere, and from the most bizarre vectors.

Last edited by Digitalis; 12-08-2019 at 08:02 AM.
12-07-2019, 07:46 PM - 1 Like   #45
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QuoteOriginally posted by Digitalis Quote
Code always has its quirks, just when you squash one bug the code unravels to unleash several more. Your ideal of no bugs is laudable, however there are undoubtedly some small ones that will crop up.
I used to have a quote up on the wall above my screen that went something like "Testing will only prove the presence of bugs, never their absence"
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