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05-19-2011, 02:28 AM   #1
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Event Photography ... some feedback on my proofs?

Shooting event assignments on my DSLR takes me a bit out of my comfort zone. (mostly doing fine art projects on medium format film these days - and those images rarely involve people)

Anyway, I've shot several events for a client of mine. Each time, my technique and delivered images get a little better (I think). I still feel like maybe some things are lacking and could always use some advice and constructive criticism ... so if some other pros or semi-pros have time, weigh in

http://flickr.com/gp/dubesor/y96535/
Here are the proofs - you can view each one at 1000px (click on thumbnail, then click again on the image when it loads).


For this gig, I used my K-x with the F 50/1.7, FAJ 18-35, and M 100/2.8 lenses. Kind of silly selection, I know, but gotta work with what I've got (sold off a lot of my 35mm gear, including the FA 50/1.4).

I feel like my AF lenses missed focus a bunch of times ... what do you think? But the high ISO on the K-x is fantastic - I didn't need a flash.

PS I'll also be posting proofs from the 2nd day of this event, when I used only the DA 35/2.4 and also shot 2 rolls of film on my Pentax 645.


Last edited by Dubesor; 05-19-2011 at 11:26 PM.
05-19-2011, 12:07 PM   #2
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Looks great to me. You nailed exposure and focus; that's what counts at an event like this more so than fancy composition.
05-21-2011, 01:47 AM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ole Quote
Looks great to me. You nailed exposure and focus; that's what counts at an event like this more so than fancy composition.
Thanks

Anyone else want to comment?
05-21-2011, 10:01 AM   #4
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They look good to me, that's just what you get from this type of event, the prospect of exciting images, sexy girls and car chases just don't happen at them.

At the end of the day is the client happy? and perhaps more importantly have you been paid and that's how to survive to the next event.

05-21-2011, 03:17 PM   #5
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I noticed that in the close up portrait-orientation shots of the speakers, the framing of the photos is a bit off (imho).. the head is too close to the side edge of the photo, resulting in one side of their body being cut off and the resulting composition a bit awkward looking. Though I realize that in an event setting, composition sometimes takes a back seat to capturing what's going on.

However, from the looks of it, you have your exposure and focus under control.. so try paying a bit more attention to how you frame your shots. I agree with your sentiment that the AF missed focus a few times but overall it was pretty good I think. What AF mode were you shooting with?.. and isn't only one of your lenses auto-focus and the others are manual?

Keep it up and event shooting will no longer be out of your comfort zone!
05-21-2011, 05:35 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by twilight_samurai Quote
I noticed that in the close up portrait-orientation shots of the speakers, the framing of the photos is a bit off (imho).. the head is too close to the side edge of the photo, resulting in one side of their body being cut off and the resulting composition a bit awkward looking. Though I realize that in an event setting, composition sometimes takes a back seat to capturing what's going on.
Oh I see what you mean ... I think that was natural to me for some reason. Next time around, I'll try centering these people in the frame and see how that looks.

QuoteQuote:
I agree with your sentiment that the AF missed focus a few times but overall it was pretty good I think. What AF mode were you shooting with?.. and isn't only one of your lenses auto-focus and the others are manual?
Two of the three lenses were AF. With those, I used AF-A mode with the "Select spot" (the one that looks like a honeycomb). I used the centremost spot.
05-23-2011, 01:18 PM - 2 Likes   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Dubesor Quote
Next time around, I'll try centering these people in the frame and see how that looks.
No no no no no! Don't do that! I think in general many of the vertical people shots are just a bit too tight. Frame a little looser, especially when people are gesturing a lot. THere are quite a few hands that have gestured their way right out of the frame. Instead of trying to get your ideal tight framing, then losing people who gesture and move too much, just shoot looser and crop later. You'll have a much higher keeper rate.

Focus seems mostly great, and exposure is generally right on. But I think you could have done a lot more to keep that bright window out of you images. There are quite a few with a giant blown out window in the background. Put it behind you, make it work for you. As important as these two things are, I don't think that means you shouldn't pursue original, creative and artistic compositions. There is definitely a bit to much of a snapshot, point-and-shoot feel to this set. Get creative, look for the details that tell the story.

But most of all, I see a lack of moments in these images. With events, and anything really, one of the most important things is catching the memorably, authentic moments that happened. In these images, they look a little like the could have just been taken at any time. None of them really jump at me like, 'Wow, what a great moment!". And I understand that it's entirely possible that this was a boring event and there were no great moments, just talking heads. But whenever you can, you should be capturing the best moments of whatever you're shooting. When ever you press the shutter release, there's should ideally be a reason for why you pressed it right then, and not just whenever.

Good work, keep at it!

Cheers,

Ben
05-26-2011, 07:10 AM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by FullertonImages Quote
No no no no no! Don't do that! I think in general many of the vertical people shots are just a bit too tight. Frame a little looser, especially when people are gesturing a lot. THere are quite a few hands that have gestured their way right out of the frame. Instead of trying to get your ideal tight framing, then losing people who gesture and move too much, just shoot looser and crop later. You'll have a much higher keeper rate.

Focus seems mostly great, and exposure is generally right on. But I think you could have done a lot more to keep that bright window out of you images. There are quite a few with a giant blown out window in the background. Put it behind you, make it work for you. As important as these two things are, I don't think that means you shouldn't pursue original, creative and artistic compositions. There is definitely a bit to much of a snapshot, point-and-shoot feel to this set. Get creative, look for the details that tell the story.

But most of all, I see a lack of moments in these images. With events, and anything really, one of the most important things is catching the memorably, authentic moments that happened. In these images, they look a little like the could have just been taken at any time. None of them really jump at me like, 'Wow, what a great moment!". And I understand that it's entirely possible that this was a boring event and there were no great moments, just talking heads. But whenever you can, you should be capturing the best moments of whatever you're shooting. When ever you press the shutter release, there's should ideally be a reason for why you pressed it right then, and not just whenever.

Good work, keep at it!

Cheers,

Ben
This is fantastic advice.

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