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09-26-2013, 08:08 AM   #1
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4x5 Kodachromes from WWII

Just found this and was not sure if anyone has seen it. Pretty fantastic stuff. Finding color photos from WWII is not that common.

4×5 Kodachromes | Pavel Kosenko's blog (English version)

Just a couple of samples:




09-26-2013, 08:55 AM   #2
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Nice find but it has been around the block a few times here on PF.
09-26-2013, 10:32 AM   #3
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Yeah, I figured that.
09-26-2013, 12:35 PM   #4
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Thanks, I was not aware of those photos.

09-26-2013, 12:37 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by derelict Quote
4x5 Kodachromes from WWII
Thanks for posting the link, interesting to see high quality imagery from that time period.
09-26-2013, 05:51 PM   #6
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And this is why film is still superior to digital imaging.
09-28-2013, 02:29 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by gaweidert Quote
And this is why film is still superior to digital imaging.
Shootout
09-29-2013, 05:57 AM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by jogiba Quote
Somewhat biased article. What speed film was used? Kodachrome 25 or even 64 would have won hands down. Sadly, no longer available. Different films have different resolutions. What generation of reproduction are we looking at in the film image? My original intent was archival quality, Take you best shots and put them on an SD card. Stick it in a file cabinet for 70 years. Take it out and then read the images. Will you be able to? Lets burn them into a DVD. Any DVD readers in 70 years? Plus a burned DVD/CD has a rated shelf life of 5 years if stored in your home. Some glass negatives taken during the American Civil War (1861 - 1865) wound up doing duty as glass panes in a greenhouse for decades before they were spotted and recovered.

A film based image can be taken and stored unattended for decades. If it is Kodachrome or B&W, the images will last for centuries if properly stored. No other maintenance activity will need to be done. Digital files will need constant attention during that time. Several format and media conversions will need to occur. Who will pay for this?

Sitting in a drawer in my house are a few boxes of 4 x 5 glass negatives. They were recovered from a trash bin at Eastman Kodak Company. Somebody had thrown them out. Another employee and myself spotted them and were able to recover them. Since he got there first he had pick of the litter. These images are at least 95 years old. How do you spot a 95 year old digital file?

09-29-2013, 06:40 AM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by gaweidert Quote
Somewhat biased article. What speed film was used? Kodachrome 25 or even 64 would have won hands down. Sadly, no longer available. Different films have different resolutions. What generation of reproduction are we looking at in the film image? My original intent was archival quality, Take you best shots and put them on an SD card. Stick it in a file cabinet for 70 years. Take it out and then read the images. Will you be able to? Lets burn them into a DVD. Any DVD readers in 70 years? Plus a burned DVD/CD has a rated shelf life of 5 years if stored in your home. Some glass negatives taken during the American Civil War (1861 - 1865) wound up doing duty as glass panes in a greenhouse for decades before they were spotted and recovered.

A film based image can be taken and stored unattended for decades. If it is Kodachrome or B&W, the images will last for centuries if properly stored. No other maintenance activity will need to be done. Digital files will need constant attention during that time. Several format and media conversions will need to occur. Who will pay for this?

Sitting in a drawer in my house are a few boxes of 4 x 5 glass negatives. They were recovered from a trash bin at Eastman Kodak Company. Somebody had thrown them out. Another employee and myself spotted them and were able to recover them. Since he got there first he had pick of the litter. These images are at least 95 years old. How do you spot a 95 year old digital file?
I really don't care what happens to my digital files in 95 years and my digital images from my first digital camera from 2001 look exactly like they did back then today. I still have my 6x7 Pentax along with 120/220 film in my freezer but I know it could not match images taken with my full frame camera. BTW there was never a 120 version of Kodachrome 25 and if Kodachrome was as great as you think it was it would still be available.
09-29-2013, 07:02 AM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by kcobain1992 Quote
Thanks, I was not aware of those photos.
Nor was I. Thanks!
09-29-2013, 07:56 AM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by jogiba Quote
I really don't care what happens to my digital files in 95 years and my digital images from my first digital camera from 2001 look exactly like they did back then today. I still have my 6x7 Pentax along with 120/220 film in my freezer but I know it could not match images taken with my full frame camera. BTW there was never a 120 version of Kodachrome 25 and if Kodachrome was as great as you think it was it would still be available.

Kodachrome was as GREAT as I KNOW it was. But it offered true to life color and was extremely difficult to process. It was essentially the old dye transfer system. The film was black and white and the color dyes were added during processing. You needed a complete analytical chemical lab to maintain color quality control. The E6 based transparency films are easier to process, but have terrible longevity. They tend to go heavily magenta with age.


There is a simple reason Kodachrome is no longer available. It's major user were professional photographers and that branch of photography has had little interest in accurate color rendition the last 25 years or so. Digital imaging is very much suited to professional photography as it is so easy to manipulate the image to give the customer whatever they wanted. Transparency film use of all sorts underwent a major decline in the 80's and 90's. Kodachrome was expensive to manufacture and process. Plus you cannot process it at home except as a black and white film,

Film has no purple fringe. Film does not exhibit moire patterns, Film can be used in any camera ever made if you want to cut it to size for the obsolete formats. Film stores longer than digital files. Some images and events are historic and need to be recorded and preserved. Film is still the best media to use for this. You will always be able to scan the negative or transparency,

Digital imaging can be a very expensive hobby if you are an equipment freak. Upgrades to the capture technology necessitate a whole new camera. For the top level cameras that is the equivalent of hundreds if not thousands of rolls of film. It also offers several advantages over film. Ease of image access and manipulation being foremost. It is also the least trustworthy imaging technology out there. As a juror I would not put much trust in a digital image as evidence. I would want access to the original files.

And yes I have converted almost exclusively to digital imaging. For my part it is changing with the time. It is necessary and technically, the images are pretty good. It is a different image capture technology but not necessarily a better quality capture technology.
09-29-2013, 03:54 PM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by gaweidert Quote
These images are at least 95 years old. How do you spot a 95 year old digital file?
I'll remember to answer that question in 95 years time...

QuoteOriginally posted by gaweidert Quote
Film has no purple fringe.
Debatable, but we can all agree that LoCa is just as problematic on film or Digital - but at least with digital it is easier to correct.

QuoteOriginally posted by gaweidert Quote
It is also the least trustworthy imaging technology out there. As a juror I would not put much trust in a digital image as evidence. I would want access to the original files.
Having worked in forensics I would have to disagree, while film does have higher verisimilitude due to the physicality of the medium, this is a rather complacent attitude. Digital images - RAW files specifically, are basically tamper proof - sure you can alter the processing variables as you can with film but the image content itself cannot be manipulated.
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