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02-06-2019, 07:19 AM - 2 Likes   #31
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Reading through the threads, my response to most would be "exactly". Similar circumstance, niece, shoe-string budget, etc. Shot with two bodies (K-5iis with a Sigma 18-35, K-1 with Pentax 28-105 & Sigma 70-200). Enlisted the help of another niece as "second shooter". The plan was to be opposite to each other (front & rear/side to side) to exploit as many photo opportunities as presented...as it was an outdoor wedding, slight adjustments needed to be made to utilize the natural sunlight and as expected it started and ran a little later than planned...funny how quickly that afternoon sun can get to the horizon in a Fall wedding). I normally shoot in RAW (.dng) format for extra security and did so for this event also but it added to the processing time of the 600 shots.
The hindsights; if using your two cameras, make sure the the time on each camera is exact and that the EXIF data identifies each camera. This is essential when establishing a chronological order for the shots (I failed this one...made for a slight processing nightmare!!)
Get someone (other than the shooters) to choreograph and perform crowd control. Add to the exuberance of the day, the various personalities, a little alchohol and keeping the wedding party focused is like herding cats (there's always the great aunt from timbuktu who pushes in and insists on "their shots and poses" basically delaying loosing your "perfect" moment totally oblivious to your interests and role. Found it was difficult to keep an eye on the crowd and do the job of operating the camera at the same time (there's always that "one" that will jump in front of you once you've got the wedding party focused and ready...even with the viewfinder coverage of the Pentax's you don't see that one coming!)
Weddings are personal and getting close makes the shot in my opinion. The majority of the "preferred" shots were covered in that 30-70mm range. The 70-200mm provided a little "help" for some close-ups (during the placing of the rings, etc.) Other than that time, a lot of weight for very little application although the wide aperture did allow a nice bokeh obscuring an otherwise so-so background.
As the day rolls into evening, lighting does become a problem and the shots tend to be more larger group than couples and individuals making the camera flash a little redundant. Found setting the camera on the TAV mode helped with the low light and the dark ambience of the reception hall.
There's the need for the expected "formal" shots but some of the ones most enjoyed were the "goof" shots where the party played to the camera and truly relaxing to enjoy the moment. Figuring out how to "delivery" these images for viewing and knowing the couple weren't the coffee table photo album type, decided to put the images into ProShow making an animation of the day burned to a DVD (along with the whole range of images for printing if desired). They can now relive their "day" by viewing it on TV.
So, for me, it was stressul with lots of learning but it was lots of fun in the end. Would I rush out to find another wedding to shoot; no! Wildlife and machinery are more controllable. For family this participation is now just part of the good memory of that day.


Last edited by AlwaysAl; 02-06-2019 at 07:22 AM. Reason: add an image
02-06-2019, 03:29 PM   #32
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QuoteOriginally posted by Sandy Hancock Quote
....and be the host of the party. If you're stuck behind a camera it is hard to do that well, and enjoy it.
If you can't enjoy your daughter's wedding, why are you there?
You're still forgetting the simple fact that the OP's daughter wants him to perform this role. When asked to carry out a role at a wedding, it's best to graciously accept the job offered, if it's within your capabilities. While it's clear that you would have said no, the reality is that the OP has said yes and is now asking for advice how to perform that job admirably.

Who's to say that won't be an enjoyable experience for both father and daughter? I'm asking you to be respectful of the OP's decision to be one of the photographers at his daughter's wedding.
02-06-2019, 03:30 PM - 1 Like   #33
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QuoteOriginally posted by AlwaysAl Quote
Reading through the threads, my response to most would be "exactly". Similar circumstance, niece, shoe-string budget, etc. Shot with two bodies (K-5iis with a Sigma 18-35, K-1 with Pentax 28-105 & Sigma 70-200). Enlisted the help of another niece as "second shooter". The plan was to be opposite to each other (front & rear/side to side) to exploit as many photo opportunities as presented...as it was an outdoor wedding, slight adjustments needed to be made to utilize the natural sunlight and as expected it started and ran a little later than planned...funny how quickly that afternoon sun can get to the horizon in a Fall wedding). I normally shoot in RAW (.dng) format for extra security and did so for this event also but it added to the processing time of the 600 shots.
The hindsights; if using your two cameras, make sure the the time on each camera is exact and that the EXIF data identifies each camera. This is essential when establishing a chronological order for the shots (I failed this one...made for a slight processing nightmare!!)
Get someone (other than the shooters) to choreograph and perform crowd control. Add to the exuberance of the day, the various personalities, a little alchohol and keeping the wedding party focused is like herding cats (there's always the great aunt from timbuktu who pushes in and insists on "their shots and poses" basically delaying loosing your "perfect" moment totally oblivious to your interests and role. Found it was difficult to keep an eye on the crowd and do the job of operating the camera at the same time (there's always that "one" that will jump in front of you once you've got the wedding party focused and ready...even with the viewfinder coverage of the Pentax's you don't see that one coming!)
Weddings are personal and getting close makes the shot in my opinion. The majority of the "preferred" shots were covered in that 30-70mm range. The 70-200mm provided a little "help" for some close-ups (during the placing of the rings, etc.) Other than that time, a lot of weight for very little application although the wide aperture did allow a nice bokeh obscuring an otherwise so-so background.
As the day rolls into evening, lighting does become a problem and the shots tend to be more larger group than couples and individuals making the camera flash a little redundant. Found setting the camera on the TAV mode helped with the low light and the dark ambience of the reception hall.
There's the need for the expected "formal" shots but some of the ones most enjoyed were the "goof" shots where the party played to the camera and truly relaxing to enjoy the moment. Figuring out how to "delivery" these images for viewing and knowing the couple weren't the coffee table photo album type, decided to put the images into ProShow making an animation of the day burned to a DVD (along with the whole range of images for printing if desired). They can now relive their "day" by viewing it on TV.
So, for me, it was stressul with lots of learning but it was lots of fun in the end. Would I rush out to find another wedding to shoot; no! Wildlife and machinery are more controllable. For family this participation is now just part of the good memory of that day.
Great advice. Thank you for posting.
02-08-2019, 07:35 PM - 2 Likes   #34
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I know a lot of you are saying I should hire a photographer as a wedding gift. Please bear in mind that the ceremony will be adjacent to the celebration room and the ceremony will be IN the celebration room in case of rain.

Now she also wants only 3-4 nice pictures. Wedding albums are not in style much around here any more. She does not event want prints ! Just pictures on a USB key to show her friends on a tv set or PC.

She says a wedding album will only pick up dust for the next 40 years.

My most important recommendation is to have a second shooter AND I am also looking into a THIRD shooter.

Thanks again everyone !

02-08-2019, 08:00 PM   #35
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Most people have cell phones these days with good picture quality. I'm sure there will be many more photos than planned on from which the couple can pick and choose. Just embrace the moment and have fun.
02-08-2019, 08:14 PM - 1 Like   #36
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QuoteOriginally posted by devouges Quote
I know a lot of you are saying I should hire a photographer as a wedding gift. Please bear in mind that the ceremony will be adjacent to the celebration room and the ceremony will be IN the celebration room in case of rain.

Now she also wants only 3-4 nice pictures. Wedding albums are not in style much around here any more. She does not event want prints ! Just pictures on a USB key to show her friends on a tv set or PC.

She says a wedding album will only pick up dust for the next 40 years.

My most important recommendation is to have a second shooter AND I am also looking into a THIRD shooter.

Thanks again everyone !
I'd recommend that, apart from the usual (typical) wedding pictures, you also make sure you get a few photos of every guest. Now, some 23 years after our wedding, we find those pictures the most fun to look at.
02-09-2019, 05:51 PM - 2 Likes   #37
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QuoteOriginally posted by MarkJerling Quote
I'd recommend that, apart from the usual (typical) wedding pictures, you also make sure you get a few photos of every guest. Now, some 23 years after our wedding, we find those pictures the most fun to look at.
+1 to what event togs call 'coverage'.

I got paid a couple of months ago to shoot someone's 50th birthday and set myself the objective of getting at least two shots of everyone in the house that evening. You just don't know who'll be upset by being left out.

A tip I heard ... someone in a group pic has an unreliable boyfriend? Put them at one edge so the family can crop him out later.

02-10-2019, 09:08 AM   #38
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QuoteOriginally posted by devouges Quote
- a METZ 52 AF-1 is on the way.
get as familiar and comfortable using this powerful and versatile tool.......the neatest option that comes to mind is you have a 2nd shooter (an assistant if you will) that could be used as a portable 'light stand' using the 'wireless' capabilities of the K-5ii pop up flash........

02-14-2019, 08:30 AM - 1 Like   #39
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QuoteOriginally posted by AlwaysAl Quote
...
The hindsights; if using your two cameras, make sure the the time on each camera is exact and that the EXIF data identifies each camera. This is essential when establishing a chronological order for the shots (I failed this one...made for a slight processing nightmare!!)
...
This. I cursed for so long over what would have been a matter of seconds done on camera.
02-19-2019, 09:01 AM   #40
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QuoteOriginally posted by Aaron28 Quote
get as familiar and comfortable using this powerful and versatile tool.......the neatest option that comes to mind is you have a 2nd shooter (an assistant if you will) that could be used as a portable 'light stand' using the 'wireless' capabilities of the K-5ii pop up flash........
WOW ! Great idea ! I did not think about that ! I will do some testing when I do a test run of the location.

Thanks ! ! !
02-19-2019, 07:50 PM   #41
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QuoteOriginally posted by devouges Quote
Thanks ! ! !
you bet! good luck!
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