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03-08-2019, 06:17 AM   #31
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QuoteOriginally posted by Mistral75 Quote
Both lenses below are 50mm f/1.4 with short backfocus. Times change...

Photography ©Richard Wong
That is not saying anything about the performance of such lenses at their fastest aperture.


But times change to big, sharp, corrected, low CA lenses, and times could very well change to smaller, less corrected lenses in the future.

Perhaps we see more in-camera correction paired with smaller lenses in the future on some platform. With computer processing internally to enhance IQ.

I think we have already reached the 'good enough' in most systems for taking a majority of imagery. Now we are working on enhancing the ease of use on photography. Perhaps this is why we see a trend towards video? There is still room to grow over there. Even if that room is more marketing than an actual need.. I already see 8k and beyond mapped out...


I wonder how many camera manufacturers would opt to exist like Pentax as a brand instead of flaming out entirely? I mean low market cap and slow new product delivery with fewer changes over a long term? Maybe we see in 5 to 10 years more of that?

03-08-2019, 06:43 AM   #32
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I gave the new Olympus a good look the other day after someone on the forum went on about how great it was. There really wasn't much of a downside, except for price. And for a birder, carting a 50-200 instead of a 100-400 sounds absolutely doable. But then there's the price.
03-08-2019, 10:50 AM   #33
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QuoteOriginally posted by normhead Quote
I gave the new Olympus a good look the other day after someone on the forum went on about how great it was. There really wasn't much of a downside, except for price. And for a birder, carting a 50-200 instead of a 100-400 sounds absolutely doable. But then there's the price.
Agree on all points. They had quite a number of large prints hanging at their booth at WPPI. The portraits looked very sharp and detailed but the landscapes lacked that sharpness and clarity you need from a nature print. I guess that is where the sensor size shows its shortcoming. The new camera is just a BIG blob like the Canon and Nikon offerings. Maybe little smaller but still big. The smaller cameras felt nice in the hand and the shutter smoothness was just sublime. I have never heard a shutter so quiet. They have the lenses too to complement their gear. As a system, it will be compact for sure compared to DSLR but perhaps just as pricy.

I think this Olympus and M43 debate and small sensor size should be a nice reminder for the APSc shooters that their camera's sensor is considerably bigger than and M43. In another words if M43 images are competitive, then APSc should be just as good if not better?
03-08-2019, 12:37 PM - 1 Like   #34
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QuoteOriginally posted by loveisageless Quote
Last year due to financial setbacks, I sold most of my Pentax full frame gear and kept my 645Z kit. Health issues forced me to let the 645Z go in favor of a lighter used Nikon D850. When the Nikon Z7 came out, I rented one and liked it enough that I sold the D850 in favor of a used Z7. It was a good thing because I recently had a heart attack which I am still recovering from. As a long time Pentaxian, who loved the K-1, I can honestly say that the Z7 is the most Pentax like camera I have handled from an ergonomic and image quality (and many would say autofocus performance lol) standpoint. I am able to carry it with a 24-70mm lens in a small sling bag. I am not surprised that Nikon was getting a lot of attention at the trade show. I still love Pentax cameras and lenses. I am in a holding pattern on picking up a used K-1 until I know how much weight I will be able to schlepp post rehab.
I am not a big fan of the Nikon GUI and never liked it much. The cameras felt ok ergonomically but overall was a no go for me. It all changed after playing around with Z7 at the Nikon booth. I went around and tried all the available cameras except the Canon offerings. You are right in saying it felt the most K1 like. I liked the Z7 a lot. I also liked that they went real compact with the 24-70.

The other big surprise was the Fuji MF offerings. I was seriously thinking about letting my K1 outfit go in favor of the Fuji MF. That was until I got a chance to see them up close. They bodies and lenses are gigantic. After seeing the Fujiís, all is a sudden the 645Z does not seem so big after all! I spoke to one of the Fuji guys in length about the Fuji MF system. Towards the end of our talk I told him that I was a K1 shooter. His comment was that my gain in quality would be marginal!! I am sure he would be in trouble if his boss overheard him.

03-08-2019, 03:43 PM - 1 Like   #35
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QuoteOriginally posted by btnapa Quote
. Towards the end of our talk I told him that I was a K1 shooter. His comment was that my gain in quality would be marginal!! I am sure he would be in trouble if his boss overheard him.
We are so lucky to be getting 36Mp at the price we do.



03-08-2019, 03:48 PM - 2 Likes   #36
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QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
There are times when I think the best strategy is to buy into an obsolete system from a company that no longer produces photography equipment. The benefits are compelling... No fretting over what products should or could be released and when, no navel-gazing over financials and what direction the company will take next, no heated "grass is greener" debates with folks who prefer other brands. Just buy the camera and a brace of compatible lenses (all used and inexpensive) then get out and shoot, without any of the fuss and worries.

I'm only partly joking...
you shouldnt be it makes sense
03-08-2019, 04:00 PM - 2 Likes   #37
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QuoteOriginally posted by k1man Quote
you shouldnt be it makes sense
I've gone half way on that strategy already...

Of course, I have my K-3 and K-3II and current lenses, and even though the cameras are discontinued, they're clearly not obsolete. But I shoot a bunch of older cameras and lenses that have long since been superseded. Digital cameras, 10+ years old... lenses older still... And this equipment is getting at least as much use - perhaps more, I think - than my K-3. I know it can't do all the cool whizz-bang stuff, and the performance in so many areas is laughable by comparison. But the equipment has ceased to be a concern. It works, it's good, and if I can't take decent photos with it, that's down to a lack of skill and/or ingenuity on my part.

It's remarkably liberatng, and I recommend it to those fixated on the "next big thing". Shooting with older gear takes all of the "why I can't take good photos" excuses out of the equation, and puts the responsibility back on our own shoulders. It's more of a challenge, and a lot of fun.

I wouldn't necessarily want to give up my newer gear... but if I had to, I could

Last edited by BigMackCam; 03-08-2019 at 04:43 PM.
03-09-2019, 12:41 AM - 1 Like   #38
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QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
I recommend it to those fixated on the "next big thing".
i think: "next tiny incremental step" would be more like it.

03-09-2019, 01:09 AM - 1 Like   #39
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QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
I've gone half way on that strategy already...

Of course, I have my K-3 and K-3II and current lenses, and even though the cameras are discontinued, they're clearly not obsolete. But I shoot a bunch of older cameras and lenses that have long since been superseded. Digital cameras, 10+ years old... lenses older still... And this equipment is getting at least as much use - perhaps more, I think - than my K-3. I know it can't do all the cool whizz-bang stuff, and the performance in so many areas is laughable by comparison. But the equipment has ceased to be a concern. It works, it's good, and if I can't take decent photos with it, that's down to a lack of skill and/or ingenuity on my part.

It's remarkably liberatng, and I recommend it to those fixated on the "next big thing". Shooting with older gear takes all of the "why I can't take good photos" excuses out of the equation, and puts the responsibility back on our own shoulders. It's more of a challenge, and a lot of fun.

I wouldn't necessarily want to give up my newer gear... but if I had to, I could
It is a question of expectations and choosing the right camera and lens to meet them. If I mount the DFA*70-200/2.8 on KP the focus speed, accuracy and tracking are the equal of just about anything else out there. If I then mount my new DA*50-135/2.8 (over ten year old design) and press the back AF button it feels like I could read half of War and Peace before the lens motor starts. Once it gets moving it is completely, silent and locks in perfect, accurate focus though. The 50-135 images are rich and full of character, especially on the K10D with its CCD sensor. The 70-200 images on KP and K-1, while stunningly sharp, have a noticeably colder, clinical quality.

I don’t use the 50-135 for chickadees on the feeder and I don’t use the 70-200 for grandchild portraits.
03-09-2019, 02:53 AM - 1 Like   #40
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QuoteOriginally posted by monochrome Quote
It is a question of expectations and choosing the right camera and lens to meet them. If I mount the DFA*70-200/2.8 on KP the focus speed, accuracy and tracking are the equal of just about anything else out there. If I then mount my new DA*50-135/2.8 (over ten year old design) and press the back AF button it feels like I could read half of War and Peace before the lens motor starts. Once it gets moving it is completely, silent and locks in perfect, accurate focus though. The 50-135 images are rich and full of character, especially on the K10D with its CCD sensor. The 70-200 images on KP and K-1, while stunningly sharp, have a noticeably colder, clinical quality.

I don’t use the 50-135 for chickadees on the feeder and I don’t use the 70-200 for grandchild portraits.
Absolutely. And I wouldn't deny that the newer equipment performs better, offers some fantastic conveniences, and can increase the number of "keepers".

But (and I know you know this) you could use the K10D + 50-135 for those chickadees. You might have to work harder to get the shots... pre-focus on the feeder, use an aperture setting that gives sufficient depth of field for small errors, shoot in bursts to get one good capture, get closer to the feeder, maybe use a different bird feed that was more attractive to the little critters, so they'd visit more often or spend more time on the feeder, giving you more opportunities to get a good capture, etc. But it's doable.

My point being, having the latest kit is wonderful and all, but it's not essential... not necessary, even. Skill, ingenuity and tenacity will produce results on outdated cameras and lenses (as evidenced by the many thousands of amazing photos out there taken with such equipment). Some folks appear to lose sight of this, or don't want to acknowledge it. They fixate on getting the latest gear because it has one or more features, performance improvements or technical specifications that they believe are vital to achieving their goals. They don't want to have to work so hard for the shot, and would rather let the technology do more of that work. And once they fixate on the gear, the frustrations begin... my brand can't do what "brand X" does... my camera's AF tracking isn't good enough... my camera has a four year old sensor... my lens focuses too slowly... etc.

Shooting an obsolete system, or even - as in my case - obsolete models with a still-current mount, frees the user from kit envy across different brands, wasting time and emotion waiting for new models, time and money spent on trying to achieve the perfect system (which we all know doesn't exist) - and puts the onus on the photographer to be skilful and creative with what they have. Which, as it happens, is both fun and satisfying

I've no issue with folks buying and shooting the latest equipment, and I make no apology for doing so myself every once in a while. But when the desire for equipment translates into frustrations that negatively impact our enjoyment of the hobby, that's a problem.

Apologies to the OP for going off-topic

Last edited by BigMackCam; 03-09-2019 at 03:12 AM.
03-09-2019, 03:09 AM - 1 Like   #41
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QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
(...)

Apologies to the OP for going off-topic
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
03-09-2019, 03:42 AM   #42
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QuoteOriginally posted by bobell69 Quote
With a headline like that Olympus could be leaving the digital camera market, reports say - DIY Photography I find it quite surprising, especially with so many people switching to mirrorless over the past two years.
The number of photographers choosing ILC is going down every year and lots of Olympus users jumped ship to Canon, Fuji and others.

None of the brands is exempt from a "doomed" risk.


That is why shelling out money for a new mount is not advisable for the next two or three years on photographer side.
Those guys you describe will understand what I mean.

Current cameras are good for at least 3-4 more years, so there is nothing to loose.
03-09-2019, 01:03 PM   #43
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I purchased a Pen-F recently for it's in-camera customization and ergonomics/size ratio. It definitely fills a niche that none of my other cameras can. It's something I can take with me everywhere with a bunch of lenses and perform most roles well. I can't say the same for my larger cameras. I think that's a market that Olympus appeals to - jack of all trades, master of none. A lot of people enjoy that function...it just doesn't advertise very well.
03-09-2019, 01:23 PM   #44
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QuoteOriginally posted by Turbotak Quote
.it just doesn't advertise very well.
Oddly, as far as i can see, Olympus has about the highest advertising spend to units sold ratio of any camera company - strange if they miss targeting a major market - or maybe they just think it's not something they want to promote directly
03-11-2019, 08:39 PM   #45
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QuoteOriginally posted by RGlasel Quote
My daughter thought my K-30 and DA 18-135 combo was too big and heavy, so she bought an OM D E-5 II and ED 14-150mm f/4-5.6, both in silver. It lags behind my K-30 in low light and I don't like the EVF, but compared to a Q, it is pretty impressive. You would only look slightly more ridiculous with an Oly in your pocket than a Q and you don't need a hood to compose shots. Not to mention a much better selection of lenses that don't require an adapter.

P.S. The Olympus kit is also WR.
An Olympus {no, I don't remember which one} was my second choice four years ago when I purchased my Q-7. I got the Q-7 because of its possibilities as a "birding camera", and it has been very useful in putting lots of pixels on a distant subject.

QuoteOriginally posted by Turbotak Quote
I purchased a Pen-F recently for it's in-camera customization and ergonomics/size ratio. It definitely fills a niche that none of my other cameras can. It's something I can take with me everywhere with a bunch of lenses and perform most roles well. I can't say the same for my larger cameras. I think that's a market that Olympus appeals to - jack of all trades, master of none. A lot of people enjoy that function...it just doesn't advertise very well.
That is basically how I view my Q-7
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