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05-25-2013, 07:13 AM - 1 Like   #16
ibk
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Here is a music video I recently made . Shot with K-01 and DA* 16-50/2.8 on a shoulder rig.



05-25-2013, 07:46 AM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by ibk Quote
Here is a music video I recently made . Shot with K-01 and DA* 16-50/2.8 on a shoulder rig.

?????? ???????? "?? ?????? ????" - ????, ???? - YouTube
Good job! Looks very professional to me.
05-25-2013, 09:46 AM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by ibk Quote
Here is a music video I recently made . Shot with K-01 and DA* 16-50/2.8 on a shoulder rig.

?????? ???????? "?? ?????? ????" - ????, ???? - YouTube
Excellent job! Nice to see people getting professional looking videos from the K-01.
05-25-2013, 04:46 PM   #19
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Cool! Great video and congratulations :-)

05-25-2013, 11:58 PM   #20
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Top job!
So many happy faces too
05-26-2013, 11:11 AM   #21
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Thank you for your kind words.

In fact it's very easy to shoot kids with the yellow brick - they act natural and don't feel shy from the camera at all. On the other hand the adults (which happened to me several times) are looking suspicious ... till the moment they see the final result and then they go "Wow, that really came from that yellow thingy?"

I really like that moments.
05-27-2013, 01:44 AM - 1 Like   #22
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QuoteQuote:
For video/movie type work, you should pick out a lens that has 8+ aperture blades as relatively circular out of focus point sources are an important part of 'the look.'
I'd argue against that - the 'bokeh' look, or limited Depth of Field, is just one part, not a whole 'cinematic look' in itself.

And it's the main look that is excessively overused in the era of DLSR/MILC film-making, especially by Student and Amateur Film Makers.

For a true 'Cinematic' look, the shots used vary, they change according to where a talented director is taking story, and leading the viewer. Mood, timing, setting, action, all affect the choice of lens, camera motion, depth used.

Grab your favorite DVD, watch it with a note to observing when wide shots, close ups, steadicams, dollys, sliders, jibs and hand held shots take place, you're sure to get a suprise as to how much the mood of the story changes according to what the camera is doing.


No film maker worth calling themselves that will run anything other then a full manual lens.
Even a SteadiCam operator will run manual focus, usually by a Focus Puller watching the image on a UHF linked monitor, while controlling the focus via RF remote.

The K-01 will allow you to change Shutter Speed, Iris and ISO during recording. You should leave the shutter speed alone during recording - and have it set to a multiple of the frame rate for all Rolling Shutter camera. (25fpsPAL -> 50, 100, 200, 250, 400, 500. 30fpsNTSC -> 60.)
The Iris and ISO will allow you to change the exposure and Depth of Field to create the mood you want for a scene.
Higher Shutter speeds will capture action better, but there is a balance to be found between smooth motion and sharpness. A wedding doesn't need the same high speed shutter as the D-Day soldiers in Saving Private Ryan.
Higher speeds will also dim the image, so if you don't have an ND filter and there's too much light, you can raise the shutter speed at a low ISO to allow you to open the Iris up for the mood you want, especially if there isn't a great deal of movement going on, such as two people
05-28-2013, 09:07 AM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by PiDicus Rex Quote
I'd argue against that - the 'bokeh' look, or limited Depth of Field, is just one part, not a whole 'cinematic look' in itself.
And it's the main look that is excessively overused in the era of DLSR/MILC film-making, especially by Student and Amateur Film Makers.
I agree 100% that there is a lot of overused DSLR/MILC tropes going on today, (and a lot of them are in fact simulated in software rather than being done with the camera). However, I wouldn't use that as an excuse to get a slow lens or to skimp on aperture blades. Wide DoF and Pentagonal/hexagonal flare and OOF points shout 'videocamera.' If you're trying to place the look of your image somewhere more in the zone traditional cinema style, then you need to consider how narrow you can get wide open and how the aperture looks stopped down.


Last edited by verdigris; 05-28-2013 at 09:25 AM.
05-31-2013, 01:59 PM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by PiDicus Rex Quote
You should leave the shutter speed alone during recording - and have it set to a multiple of the frame rate for all Rolling Shutter camera. (25fpsPAL -> 50, 100, 200, 250, 400, 500. 30fpsNTSC -> 60.)
Could you please explain why you believe that one should keep the shutter speed at some multiple of the frame rate? Is this due to the legacy of 180 degree shutters being somewhat of a 'standard' for motion picture films?
05-31-2013, 03:43 PM   #25
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See this ► Video Camera Shutter vs Frame Rate
Then this ► Video Camera Shutter
05-31-2013, 04:02 PM   #26
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I had the K-01 at a party on saturday night and my attempts to avoid flash with the DA21 were a blurry mess...
but a first ever attempt at video when the hostest started the kitchen dance with the host was just brilliant !
Well exposed, detailed and sharp, no weird effects on rotating with the scene, good sound.
Very impressed sry I can't post it here
05-31-2013, 04:05 PM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by verdigris Quote
Could you please explain why you believe that one should keep the shutter speed at some multiple of the frame rate? Is this due to the legacy of 180 degree shutters being somewhat of a 'standard' for motion picture films?
I can't understand why shutter speed is even considered...
Is the blessed thing wacking open and closed @ 30/sec ?
05-31-2013, 04:44 PM   #28
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The cameras shutter remains open and does not actuate in the way you're thinking it does. Shutter speed is accomplished by what is known as "rolling shutter", which energizes the sensor from one end.
06-01-2013, 05:05 AM   #29
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Thanks sledger, will read up on it
06-03-2013, 05:37 AM   #30
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QuoteQuote:
Could you please explain why you believe that one should keep the shutter speed at some multiple of the frame rate? Is this due to the legacy of 180 degree shutters being somewhat of a 'standard' for motion picture films?
This simplest explanation I can give, is that it can cause the playback to strobe or flicker. In film cameras, this was because some frames would be exposed for longer then others, and some would be exposed while the film was in motion. I electronic cameras, it was because some had one clock running the fps, and a separate clock running the shutter, so frames could begin part way during, at the start, or near the end, of the sensor charge cycles.

In more modern camera, one would hope that both the fps and shutter clocks are the same, but it's never guaranteed,....

And then there's the confusion that arises from the time vs degrees vs fps - 180degrees for 25fps is longer then 180degrees for 30fps, in film that can mean the difference between correct exposure and underexposure, or over exposure going the other way.

It's simpler to just always err on the cautious side use multiples of the frame rate.
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