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11-04-2010, 02:53 PM   #1
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UN Human Development Report

The UN released their human development report. Lots of interesting information, analysis, and data in there.

For all the private sector haters out there:
QuoteQuote:
The private sector is pivotal for human development. A new conceptual framework on the role of the private sector in development has emerged recently among development institutions that recognizes the role of markets in extending choices and opportunities to poor people and households as producers, consumers and wage earners. Described variously as inclusive market development, pro-poor private sector development and making markets work for the poor, its central precept is inclusiveness.

While the individual incomes of poor people are low, their aggregate buying power is large. The average per capita income of villagers in rural Bangladesh, for instance, is less than $200 a year, but as a group they are huge consumers of telecommunication services. Across the globe—in Bangladesh, India, Kenya and the Philippines—cellular phone services have become more accessible to poor people as competition and technological advances have brought down prices. Access to phone services enhances poor people’s lives, enabling them to communicate over long distances and assisting them in their work. Cellular phones have also given many poor people access to basic financial services. For example, M-PESA, a cell phone service offered by Safaricom, gives Kenyans a fast, safe and affordable way to deposit and transfer money anywhere in the country and now provides service to about 25 percent of the population.

The private sector often provides services to poor people in areas the government fails to reach, as in water and telecommunication services. Where public schools are inadequate, many families, even poor families, have turned to private schools. In Lahore, Pakistan, for example, 37 percent of children in the lowest income group attend private schools. Credit is another example. Bangladesh’s Grameen Bank model of microfinance has been replicated around the world.

Public-private partnerships are also growing, as in the GAVI Alliance, a global public-private health partnership that has expanded vaccination coverage across 72 developing countries. Social insurance is another example of public-private partnerships helping fill a void in public provision of services. In Colombia the Family Compensation Fund of Antioquia (COMFAMA), a nonprofit social enterprise, provides health, education, housing, credit, job training and other social services to vulnerable middle- and lower middle-class families in cooperation with international organizations.
For all those obsessed with money and income inequality:
QuoteQuote:
Money matters, but the evidence shows overwhelmingly that great improvements can be achieved in other aspects of human development without going flat out for economic growth
Percentage of people living in Very High Human Development Countries:
UnitedStates 30%
Japan 12%
Germany 8%
France 6%
UnitedKingdom 6%
Italy 6%
Korea,Republicof 5%
Others 27%

Japan, Germany, and South Korea owe much of there post WWII development to US support. I still think the US is the country that creates the greatest good for the greatest number even if it isn't the greatest on any specific measure of social welfare.

Russia, France, Israel, Switzerland, and Sweden sell more weapons to the world per capita than the USA making them greater merchants of death than the USA.
pg 168

Health Statistics Pg 193

Income inequality Pg 70.

Satisfaction with healthcare quality pg 176.

Statistics on public expenditure on education, health, R&D, Military, etc. pg 198
(Very interesting, remittance inflows for US is lowest of VHHD world)


http://hdr.undp.org/en/media/HDR_2010_EN_Complete.pdf

11-04-2010, 03:40 PM   #2
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Hmmmm.. nobody here is (as far as I can tell) an outright socialist. We vary by where we draw the line and a bit on oversight and what the gov should provide for it's citizens ..........
Your own thing shows how the private sector is NOT the be all end all to the world... I believe you may agree........
QuoteQuote:
Public-private partnerships are also growing, as in the GAVI Alliance, a global public-private health partnership that has expanded vaccination coverage across 72 developing countries. Social insurance is another example of public-private partnerships helping fill a void in public provision of services. In Colombia the Family Compensation Fund of Antioquia (COMFAMA), a nonprofit social enterprise, provides health, education, housing, credit, job training and other social services to vulnerable middle- and lower middle-class families in cooperation with international organizations.
Most conserv's detest the UN and WHO.. so..........
QuoteQuote:
First, we cannot assume that future development will mimic past advances: opportunities today and in the future are greater in many respects. Second, varied experiences and specific contexts preclude overarching policy prescriptions and point towards more general principles and guidelines. Third, major new challenges must be addressed—most prominently, climate change.

Many challenges lie ahead. Some are related to policy: development policies must be based on the local context and sound overarching principles; numerous problems go beyond the capacity of individual states and require democratically accountable global institutions. There are also implications for research: deeper analysis of the surprisingly weak relationship between economic growth and improvements in health and education and careful consideration of how the multidimensionality of development objectives affects development thinking are just two examples.
http://hdr.undp.org/en/mediacentre/summary/
QuoteQuote:
But averages can be misleading. Since the
1980s, income inequality has risen in many
more countries than it has fallen. For every
country where inequality has improved in the
past 30 years, in more than two it has worsened,
most markedly in countries of the former
Soviet Union. Most countries in East
Asia and the Pacific also have higher income
inequality today than a few decades ago. Latin
America and the Caribbean is an important
recent exception: long the region with the widest
income and asset disparities, major recent
improvements have led to more progressive
public spending and targeted social policies.
Recent years have also exposed the fragility
of some of our achievements—perhaps best
illustrated by the biggest financial crisis in several
decades, which caused 34 million people
to lose their jobs and 64 million more people
to fall below the $1.25 a day income poverty
threshold. The risk of a “double-dip” recession
remains, and a full recovery could take years.
But perhaps the greatest challenge to maintaining
progress in human development comes
from the unsustainability of production and
consumption patterns. For human development
to become truly sustainable, the close link
between economic growth and greenhouse gas
emissions needs to be severed. Some developed
countries have begun to alleviate the worst
effects through recycling and investment in
public transport and infrastructure
. But most
developing countries are hampered by the high
costs and low availability of clean energy.
http://hdr.undp.org/en/media/HDR_2010_EN_Overview.pdf
UNFORTUNATELY............
http://www.wrn.com/2010/11/madison-to-milwaukee-train-derailed/
QuoteQuote:
Republican Governor-elect Scott Walker promised to kill the $810-million train project. This derailment comes just a day after the election. DOT Secretary Frank Busalacchi confirmed in a statement Thursday that he told contractors and consultants Wednesday to “interrupt their work for a few days” per the governor’s request.

Busalacchi says, considering the election results, his agency will “assess the real world consequences, including the immediate impacts to people and their livelihoods, if this project were to be stopped.”

Last edited by jeffkrol; 11-04-2010 at 03:50 PM.
11-04-2010, 05:40 PM   #3
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Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by jeffkrol Quote
For every
country where inequality has improved in the
past 30 years, in more than two it has worsened,
most markedly in countries of the former
Soviet Union.
Are you going to argue that the former soviet union is worse off due to higher income inequality?

QuoteOriginally posted by jeffkrol Quote
Most countries in East
Asia and the Pacific also have higher income
inequality today than a few decades ago.
Likewise, do you think that increased income inequality has been a bad thing for China, South Korea, Vietnam, the Philippines, and other asian/pacific countries?

pg 148 has an inequality adjusted HDI, the US loses 9 spots but is still well within the VHD group, nowhere near a "Third World America."

An interesting thing I noticed about the budget expenditures on public health is that we don't spend much less percentage of GDP on our limited public health programs than countries with universal healthcare, gold standard norwegian countries are only spending a half percent more than we are. The GOP should have just given the democrats a budget of 7.5-8% of GDP on public health care and demanded that they design a universal system as good or better within that budget.
11-04-2010, 06:15 PM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by mikemike Quote
Are you going to argue that the former soviet union is worse off due to higher income inequality?



Likewise, do you think that increased income inequality has been a bad thing for China, South Korea, Vietnam, the Philippines, and other asian/pacific countries?

pg 148 has an inequality adjusted HDI, the US loses 9 spots but is still well within the VHD group, nowhere near a "Third World America."

An interesting thing I noticed about the budget expenditures on public health is that we don't spend much less percentage of GDP on our limited public health programs than countries with universal healthcare, gold standard norwegian countries are only spending a half percent more than we are. The GOP should have just given the democrats a budget of 7.5-8% of GDP on public health care and demanded that they design a universal system as good or better within that budget.
Even China understands it must close the gap. do the research.
Is Low-Wage China Disappearing? - Project Syndicate
QuoteQuote:
# Kemal Dervis, global economy and development division director at Brookings and a former economy minister for Turkey, said reducing inequality isn't just a matter of fairness or morality. An economy based on consumption needs consumers, and if too much wealth is concentrated at the top there may be times when there is not enough demand to support growth. (this goes back to when Henry Ford decided those who built the cars should be paid a wage where they could actually afford the product they created - now we are moving the other direction as a society)
http://www.marketoracle.co.uk/Article23730.html
As to the Soviet Union they had an extremely high savings rate because goods weren't available.. So was that a good thing..
will get back to that.......
http://www.imf.org/external/np/speeches/2002/032002.htm


Last edited by jeffkrol; 11-04-2010 at 06:53 PM.
11-05-2010, 04:05 AM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by mikemike Quote
QuoteQuote:
Money matters, but the evidence shows overwhelmingly that great improvements can be achieved in other aspects of human development without going flat out for economic growth
But this isn't talking about income inequality - this is pure old style economic growth, you know, factories and bridges and stuff like that.

The more modern sort of approach includes micro-financed small business development in local settings, rather than solely the importation of an industrial complex and the exploitation of resources for GDP gain.


The question of income inequality is to a good degree relative - surely it is a good thing we're not the kleptocracy the former Soviets have become. In our case, if things got that bad for us, yes, we'd be way worse off. In Russia, it is a more complicated question, involving values and economics: is the current kleptocracy better or worse than the old Communist version of same.
11-05-2010, 05:55 AM   #6
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Maybe Russia should be a "case study" of what's going wrong here.........
what we don't have........ income increases and increased spending power..
What they are doing..
QuoteQuote:
Domestic demand was the engine of the expansion, fuelled by buoyant consumer confidence and a recovery in real wages.
We may just need to reflect on this:
QuoteQuote:
Crucially, momentum was lost in the wake of the 1996 elections, when powerful vested interests strengthened their hold on political and economic power, deepening corruption.
QuoteQuote:
The economy had averaged 7% growth since the 1998 Russian financial crisis, resulting in a doubling of real disposable incomes and the emergence of a middle class. The Russian economy, however, was one of the hardest hit by the 2008-09 global economic crisis as oil prices plummeted and the foreign credits that Russian banks and firms relied on dried up. The Central Bank of Russia spent one-third of its $600 billion international reserves, the world's third largest, in late 2008 to slow the devaluation of the ruble. The government also devoted $200 billion in a rescue plan to increase liquidity in the banking sector and aid Russian firms unable to roll over large foreign debts coming due. The economic decline appears to have bottomed out in mid-2009 and by the second half of the year there were signs that the economy was growing, albeit slowly. Long-term challenges include a shrinking workforce, a high level of corruption, and poor infrastructure in need of large capital investment.
https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/rs.html
As to what income equality REALLY does or helps is still really questionable: Studies conflict.......
http://economics.ucr.edu/papers/papers01/01-38.pdf
Income Inequality is not Harmful for Growth: Theory and Evidence - Li - 2002 - Review of Development Economics - Wiley Online Library
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