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04-14-2018, 05:08 AM - 1 Like   #136
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QuoteOriginally posted by Peter R Quote
Don't own a Pentax, but since you have all done such great research, I thought I would add some info for you. I know the thread is old, but I have stumbled across probably the earliest known studio portrait by Kajiwara operating out of 810 Olive Street St. Louis. There has been some debate in this forum and elsewhere about when his studio was operating. The photo in my possession is signed T. Kajiwara, dated 1904. Also stamped with red Japanese 'hanko', and also impressed studio mark - Kajiwara Studio, 810 Olive St. St. Louis. Here is the interesting bit: the image is of a sophisticated looking middle-aged Japanese man in Western suit. Nothing to go on....but through guess work, putting two together I have found that it is of Baron Matsudaira, of samurai stock. He was vice-president of the Japan exhibits at the St. Louis Purchasing Exhibition in 1904 (also acted in this capacity at the world-famous Japan-British Exhibition of 1910). Thus, when visiting the St. Louis exhibition in 1904 in an official capacity, Baron Matsudaira would have sat for his emigre compatriot. A similar photo of him, but wearing a uniform can be found in Handbook of the Japan and Japanese Exhibits at the World's Fair, St. Louis (1904), by Hajime Hoshi. It's a beautiful photo, in extremely fine condition and in its original frame. Is this Kajiwara's earliest extant male portrait? I know this thread is old. Hope someone picks it up and is interested by this. Image is my copyright - permission must be sought for reuse.
That’s a great post. Thank you for the addition. I have lived in St. Louis all my life and am a member of a private library (The St. Louis Mercantile Library Assn.) that coincidentally owns a number of his prints of society ladies and debutantes. Next time I am there I will inquire with the collection curator about your question.

04-14-2018, 05:56 AM   #137
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QuoteOriginally posted by monochrome Quote
That’s a great post. Thank you for the addition. I have lived in St. Louis all my life and am a member of a private library (The St. Louis Mercantile Library Assn.) that coincidentally owns a number of his prints of society ladies and debutantes. Next time I am there I will inquire with the collection curator about your question.
Thanks very much monochrome. I'm particularly interested in ascertaining the earliest known studio portrait by him. Just read that Baron Matsudaira was residing at 320 Newstead Avenue, I imagine for the duration of the exhibition. Never having had the pleasure of visiting St. Louis, I've no idea what that area of the city was like then/is like now - I imagine affluent (at least then). I'm also intrigued whether Matsudaira did any on-location photography in patron's houses, or, as I imagine, they came to his studios. Cheers.
04-14-2018, 06:24 AM - 1 Like   #138
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QuoteOriginally posted by Peter R Quote
Thanks very much monochrome. I'm particularly interested in ascertaining the earliest known studio portrait by him. Just read that Baron Matsudaira was residing at 320 Newstead Avenue, I imagine for the duration of the exhibition. Never having had the pleasure of visiting St. Louis, I've no idea what that area of the city was like then/is like now - I imagine affluent (at least then). I'm also intrigued whether Matsudaira did any on-location photography in patron's houses, or, as I imagine, they came to his studios. Cheers.
I can share as much period St. Louis history as you care to know - probably better off-line.

St. Louis was quite wealthy at the turn of the 20th century as a result of westward expansion. In 1900 St. Louis was the most populous city in the country west of Philadelphia. I think it likely patrons visited Kajiwara’s studio, for the most part. 810 Olive was a prestigious office building at the time (corporate headquarters, attorneys, society jewelers and high class services such as society photographers rented space there) and is presently undergoing restoration to its former glory.

320 S. Newstead at the time was a series of professional row houses that were quite nice architecturally but not particularly evident of true wealth. Affluent is an apt label. It is likely he rented a room or rooms from some family during his stay. That is known to have been quite common. The Exposition itself was a short streetcar or carriage ride west-perhaps a mile west. Just a few blocks north the residences were much larger, detached, and reflected true wealth. Most of these mansions survived and remain today - 3-5 acre plots with 20-room homes on them (and large homes on smaller plots, in gated communities with restrictive covenenants, even then). Lindell Blvd was an economic boundary then and is now. A bit west it served as the northern boundary of the Exposition Grounds.

The entire area south of the wealthiest part, south of Lindell, which is two blocks north of 320 Newstead - hundreds of square blocks of row houses including Newstead - was gradually demolished and converted to light industry after WWI, accelerating post-WWII and then fell into terrible decline in the 70’s-80’s as those businesses moved to modern industrial parks.

Today the entire corridor including 800 S Newstead is undergoing massive reinvestment as a biotechnology / bioengineering / IT vibrant business area (not a park, but a community of businesses) and remaining loft warehouses converted into businesses and homes.

Last edited by monochrome; 04-14-2018 at 07:41 AM.
04-14-2018, 11:23 PM   #139
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Thanks for the interesting details monochrome. I'm based here in Japan and have access to an enormous range of Japanese and non-Japanese sources that might, in time, help with this thread. P.

09-05-2018, 10:45 AM - 2 Likes   #140
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QuoteOriginally posted by Mike Cash Quote
Finally have a chance to sit down and look at the name listing stone and the very first thing I notice is that my suspicion about this being either a relocated or refurbished/consolidated tomb is right on both counts. The tomb is a relocation from Koushouji Temple (香正寺), a Nichiren Buddhist temple in Fukuoka City, and the move is dated November 18, 1933. (This cemetery, operated by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government, opened in 1923).

There are 10 names listed on the stone, six male and four female, plus the one blank space:

Keiyo(?) or Keisei(?) d. Nov 27, 1902 aged 67
Chie d. Aug(?) 18, 1920 aged 79
Yoshiro d. Feb 15, 1927 aged 49
Shigero(?) d. Feb 6, 1944 aged 28 (died in the war)
Kumao d. July 5, 1947 aged 78
Kango d. Dec 14, 1958 aged 72
Fern(?) d. July 13, 1955 aged 63
Takuma d. Mar 11, 1960 aged 84
Yuuko d. May 20, 1966 aged 31
Blank
Nofu d. May 11, 1975 aged 92

I have no idea if "Fern" was a foreign woman who married into the family or was a Japanese woman whose mother liked the name "Fern". The other names with question marks are because there can be more than one way to read the name and without direct knowledge of what the correct reading is it is impossible to know for sure.
(f) Fern Horton Kajiwara, born Searls about 1893 in Wisconsin, US, dead July 13 in New York, 1955, aged 63, married to Takuma in 1936

This is my Great, Great Aunt. My Great Grandmother, Beulah M. Horton Searles Duckart, is her sister. Beulah Horton, D.O.B. January 6, 1892- D.O.D. April 13, 1972 (age 80).
09-15-2018, 05:36 PM   #141
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Hello! I am very pleased to have found this forum, especially for the outstanding research that all have been doing, especially Douglas! My interest in Takuma Kajiwara comes from finding a portrait of my grandmother, Harriett Lucille Krause Shields, among my mother’s effects. My grandmother was from St. Louis, where my mother was also born, and there are still some Krause relatives in the area. The portrait, which is undated, was done at the Kajiwara Studio, has the oval raised stamp, the red Kajiwara stamp and is signed. My best guess is that the portrait was done when my grandmother was in her mid-20s (although my wife thinks she might look as young as 18), which would mean that it was taken around 1918 or as early as 1911. My wife and I are in our downsizing time of life and our daughter is not particularly interested in inheriting much of our “stuff”, given the size of her house and the number of children she has. I saw the mention of the St. Louis Mercantile Library Association, and I was wondering if anyone knows how I might contact them to see if they might be interested in this portrait? Again, glad to have found this forum, with the added point of interest that my first real camera that was NOT a point-and-shoot was a Spotmatic F with a couple of Takumar lenses, which I still have (much to my wife’s chagrin) but have not used in some 30 years.
09-17-2018, 01:20 PM   #142
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I've just acquired of of his hoods...

09-17-2018, 05:09 PM - 1 Like   #143
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QuoteOriginally posted by jwaf001 Quote
Hello! I am very pleased to have found this forum, especially for the outstanding research that all have been doing, especially Douglas! My interest in Takuma Kajiwara comes from finding a portrait of my grandmother, Harriett Lucille Krause Shields, among my mother’s effects. My grandmother was from St. Louis, where my mother was also born, and there are still some Krause relatives in the area. The portrait, which is undated, was done at the Kajiwara Studio, has the oval raised stamp, the red Kajiwara stamp and is signed. My best guess is that the portrait was done when my grandmother was in her mid-20s (although my wife thinks she might look as young as 18), which would mean that it was taken around 1918 or as early as 1911. My wife and I are in our downsizing time of life and our daughter is not particularly interested in inheriting much of our “stuff”, given the size of her house and the number of children she has. I saw the mention of the St. Louis Mercantile Library Association, and I was wondering if anyone knows how I might contact them to see if they might be interested in this portrait? Again, glad to have found this forum, with the added point of interest that my first real camera that was NOT a point-and-shoot was a Spotmatic F with a couple of Takumar lenses, which I still have (much to my wife’s chagrin) but have not used in some 30 years.
I’m a long-time Member of the St. Louis Mercatile Library and acquainted with th collection and many Curators. I’ll gladly make the introduction. PM sent.

09-17-2018, 07:50 PM   #144
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Monochrome, thanks, I really appreciate it! How shall we go about making the connection...via my email? Again, thanks!
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