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12-18-2012, 12:55 PM   #1
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Thank you "right to work for less"

well that is really only part of the problem but it makes a fun headline..........

DATA FINDINGS
QuoteQuote:

The analysis found that inequality has risen not just in plutocratic hubs such as Wall Street and Silicon Valley, but also in virtually every corner of the world's richest nation:

Inequality has increased in 49 of 50 states since 1989. (See accompanying box on how inequality was measured.)

The poverty rate increased in 43 states, most sharply in Nevada, ravaged by the housing bust, and in Indiana, which saw a rise in low-paying jobs.

Twenty-eight states saw all three metrics of socioeconomic well-being worsen. There, inequality and poverty rose and median income fell.

In all 50 states, the richest 20 percent of households made far greater income gains than any other quintile - up 12 percent nationally.

Income for the median household - in the very middle - fell in 28 states, with Michigan and Connecticut leading the way.

The five largest increases in inequality all were in New England: Connecticut first, followed by Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont. The decline in manufacturing jobs hit New England's poor and middle hard, while the highly educated benefited from expansion in the biotech and finance industries.

The only state that didn't see a rise in inequality: Mississippi, which had an insignificant dip. The Magnolia State was one of the few to post a drop in poverty and a rise in income, but it still ranks worst in the nation on both counts.
Redistributing Up - Deborah Nelson and Himanshu Ojha - The Atlantic

12-18-2012, 01:06 PM   #2
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QuoteQuote:
Inequality has increased in 49 of 50 states since 1989. (See accompanying box on how inequality was measured.)
Okay, I'll get the ball rolling, just for fun.
"since 1989"; that would be calendar years 1990-2012 (hey, only a few days left). 23 calendar years; more than half of them with a Democrat in the White House.

And awwwwaaayyyyyyyy we go!
12-18-2012, 02:14 PM   #3
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What's the sense? Only 3 days left.
12-18-2012, 02:18 PM   #4
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...and 2 weeks to the fiscal cliff.

I hope the fishing's good

12-18-2012, 02:20 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by Nesster Quote
I hope the fishing's good
The fishing almost always good. Sometimes the catching sucks though.
12-18-2012, 02:22 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by Parallax Quote
The fishing almost always good. Sometimes the catching sucks though.
Fishing is ALWAYS good.
12-18-2012, 02:52 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Parallax Quote
Okay, I'll get the ball rolling, just for fun.
"since 1989"; that would be calendar years 1990-2012 (hey, only a few days left). 23 calendar years; more than half of them with a Democrat in the White House.

And awwwwaaayyyyyyyy we go!
HOR controls the "power of the purse"................
12-18-2012, 02:58 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by jeffkrol Quote
HOR controls the "power of the purse"................
Only when it's a Democrat president though, right. When a Republican holds the office, it's his fault.

12-18-2012, 03:09 PM   #9
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So what about Washington DC, the home of our Government?


QuoteQuote:
In the town that launched the War on Poverty 48 years ago, the poor are getting poorer despite the government's help. And the rich are getting richer because of it.

The top 5 percent of households in Washington, D.C., made more than $500,000 on average last year, while the bottom 20 percent earned less than $9,500 - a ratio of 54 to 1.


That gap is up from 39 to 1 two decades ago. It's wider than in any of the 50 states and all but two major cities. This at a time when income inequality in the United States as a whole has risen to levels last seen in the years before the Great Depression.

Americans have just emerged from a close presidential election in which the government's role as a leveling force was fiercely debated. The right argued the state does too much; the left, too little. The issue is now at the center of tense negotiations over whose taxes to raise and what social programs to cut before a Jan. 1 deadline. And the government's role will be paramount again next year if Congress takes up tax reform.

The federal government does redistribute wealth down to struggling Americans. But in the years since President Lyndon Johnson took aim at poverty in his first State of the Union address, there has been an increasingly strong crosscurrent: The government is redistributing wealth up, too - especially in the nation's capital.

The beneficiaries are not the billionaire financiers and celebrities who have come to personify income inequality in the 21st century. Yet the Washington elite are just as much part of the trend, having influenced laws and decisions that alter the entire country's distribution of income.

THE FEDERAL FUNNEL


Two decades of record federal spending and expanding regulation have fostered a growing upper class of federal contractors, lobbyists and lawyers in the District of Columbia area. The federal government funneled $83.5 billion their way in defense and other work in 2010 - an increase of more than 300 percent since 1989, even after adjusting for inflation. Private industry poured more than $3 billion into lobbying to influence the government, nearly double what it spent a decade ago.

Like spokes on a wheel, the high-rise offices of this elite radiate out from Capitol Hill along major arteries deep into suburban Maryland and Virginia. The latest Census figures placed 10 of the capital's surrounding counties in the top 20 nationwide for median household income - up from six in 1990.

There probably isn't much society can do to stop some causes of the spreading class divide, such as technological change. But there's one factor that is changeable - public policy. This series of articles explores how government is exacerbating or alleviating the causes and consequences of inequality, by examining three places where the rich-poor gap has widened.

-----------

The outsourcing boom has been particularly dramatic in the Washington region. Direct spending by the federal government accounts for 40 percent of the area's $425 billion-a-year economy. The government spends more on private-sector procurement here than in any other metropolitan area or state - up 300 percent since 1990.

Roughly 15 cents of every dollar from the entire federal procurement budget stays in or around the government's hometown, said Stephen S. Fuller, director of the Center for Regional Analysis at George Mason University. Last year, that was about $80 billion out of $536 billion in procurement spending, he said. The 15 percent share is far greater than the region's 2 percent portion of the U.S. population.

"We're seeing an enormous transfer of wealth from taxpayers to the Washington economy," said Fuller.

The federal largess kicked off a gold rush to the capital region.

Since 1990, five of the top 10 major defense contractors have moved their headquarters to the Washington area - joining Lockheed Martin, the No. 1 defense contractor and a longtime resident of suburban Maryland.

The Washington area has produced 385 of the nation's fastest-growing small- and medium-sized companies since 2000, more than any other metropolitan area, according to a study this year by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. Nearly half were government-service companies.
---

The federal government historically lifted the fortunes of poor Washingtonians, too. It provided one of the sturdiest rungs on the economic ladder for low-income high-school graduates, who had a shot at thousands of entry-level federal jobs.
...
Indeed, in 1998, one in four federal civilian jobs in the District was a clerical, blue-collar or technical position. Last year: one in eight. (They remain a third of all federal civilian jobs nationwide.)

The fall-off is even greater than those numbers indicate. The federal government began downsizing the workforce in 1991. The cuts fell disproportionately on low-skill positions that could be replaced by technology or outsourced.



---
Nearly 13,000 lobbyists registered with the government last year and reported $3.3 billion in fees, or about $260,000 per lobbyist. That's 22 percent more lobbyists and 37 percent more inflation-adjusted revenue per lobbyist than in 1998, according to a Reuters analysis of data from the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics.

Times are flush for Washington lawyers as well. The number of attorneys in the area has risen 44 percent, twice the national rate, to 41,000 since 1999. Their average income, adjusted for inflation, rose 35 percent to $156,000.

The number of organizations with a political presence in Washington - that maintain an office or are represented by lobbyists or lawyers - more than doubled between 1981 and 2006 to nearly 14,000, according to a study by political scientists Kay L. Schlozman, Sidney Verba and Henry E. Brady.

These professionals work predominantly for groups representing the top of society. Schlozman and her colleagues found that more than half the groups were devoted to furthering the interests of businesses. The next closest were state and local governments, at 12 percent. The rest were fragmented into single-digit shares among divergent interests. Second to last on the list, just above unions, were groups advocating for the poor, at 0.9 percent.

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2012/12/redistributing-up/266400/


Looks like our Dollar-wasting inefficient / Dollar-investing caring Federal Government is behaving much like our Job Creators... erm... big businesses.
12-18-2012, 03:25 PM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by Parallax Quote
Okay, I'll get the ball rolling, just for fun.
"since 1989"; that would be calendar years 1990-2012 (hey, only a few days left). 23 calendar years; more than half of them with a Democrat in the White House.

And awwwwaaayyyyyyyy we go!
You are of course right, but people tend to vastly over estimate the power of the president. The real power of government lies on the shoulders of our Senators and Congress-persons. IMHO, many of the problems we face today stem from the lack of bipartisanship in the two houses. Neither side will support anything the other side proposes, in many times just out of spite.
12-18-2012, 03:27 PM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by Tom S. Quote
You are of course right, but people tend to vastly over estimate the power of the president. The real power of government lies on the shoulders of our Senators and Congress-persons. IMHO, many of the problems we face today stem from the lack of bipartisanship in the two houses. Neither side will support anything the other side proposes, in many times just out of spite.
I know, but that wouldn't have been nearly as much fun to post.
12-18-2012, 03:44 PM   #12
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Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Nesster Quote
So what about Washington DC, the home of our Government?




Redistributing Up - Deborah Nelson and Himanshu Ojha - The Atlantic


Looks like our Dollar-wasting inefficient / Dollar-investing caring Federal Government is behaving much like our Job Creators... erm... big businesses.
And they, like biz have "us" fighting over pop guns and food stamps.. gotta love it..........
12-18-2012, 08:35 PM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by Nesster Quote
...and 2 weeks to the fiscal cliff.

I hope the fishing's good
Don't worry we have a former bar tender and a former community organizer negotiating the cliff.

***Sarcasm Warning***
12-18-2012, 08:59 PM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by Blue Quote
Don't worry we have a former bar tender and a former community organizer negotiating the cliff.

***Sarcasm Warning***
On that note...............
–Are you enjoying the ?good cop, bad cop,? kabuki theater of the absurd?

QuoteQuote:
Bottom line: Don’t believe the headlines. Both Obama and Boehner, the Democrats and the Republicans, are using the mythical “debt crisis” to do the bidding of the upper .1% income group. Their “good cop, bad cop” act is just that: An act.

Had they merely come out and said, we are going to cut the spending that benefits the lower 99.9%, you would have been outraged. But by making the results a “grand bargain,” a hard-fought “compromise” to “solve a serious problem,” they make you feel all is fair — grateful even.

Of course, since deficit reduction (also known as “austerity”) not only is unnecessary, but very harmful, and since that austerity always hurts the 99.9% more than it does the .1%, every outcome will push you down further.

And as for that proposed top rate tax increase on the rich: They never pay the top rate. Just ask Warren Buffett, whose tax rate is lower than his secretary’s. Ask Mitt Romney, who has parked his money overseas, and had to fake his tax return, just to get his rate up to 14%.

It’s all Kabuki theater that damages you and America. I hope you enjoy the show. You’re paying for it.

Rodger Malcolm Mitchell
12-19-2012, 03:40 AM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by jeffkrol Quote
Kabuki
Reminds me, one of my fave albums - had it since high school - is John Lee Hooker Kabuki Wuki. Though JLH at Cafe Au Go-Go with the muddy waters band is better (and I bought it first)...
Side 1 -
Side 2 -

Let's hope they finish their Kabuki Wuki and get us to Go-Go soon.

John Lee Hooker was a great economist. One of his better songs is Serves You Right To Suffer (the austerity song):

If you are of a certain age you may remember J Geils Band?
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