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01-11-2016, 07:23 PM   #226
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QuoteOriginally posted by p38arover Quote
Or just leaving letters out!

We watch the NZ programmes Police 10-7, Motorway Patrol, Serious Crash Unit, Coastwatch, and Border Patrol, etc., and it really is quite noticeable that Maori youth have a distinct way of speaking. Sometimes it is a struggle to understand them. :

On a pronunciation issue, how do people pronounce "harrass"? Most say "harr-ass", I say "harris" which is the correct pronunciation.

....
chur bro .....
h'rass

01-11-2016, 07:32 PM   #227
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QuoteOriginally posted by Transit Quote
chur bro .....
h'rass
The ones that cause me to froth at the mouth is "sumfink", "nuthink" and "yous". Especially when uttered by school teachers.
And my favourites "tea" for dinner and refering to a meal as a "feed".
01-11-2016, 07:38 PM   #228
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QuoteOriginally posted by MarkJerling Quote
The ones that cause me to froth at the mouth is "sumfink", "nuthink" and "yous". Especially when uttered by school teachers.
And my favourites "tea" for dinner and refering to a meal as a "feed".
I agree about -ink"! The inability of the young to speak without using the word "like" does also irk.

However, "tea" was the term used for the evening meal when I was growing up in the Fifties. I didn't start using "dinner" until the Seventies. When I was growing up, "dinner" was the hot midday meal, usually on Sunday. We didn't get a hot midday meal on any other day. (Unlike some countries, Australian schools don't generally provide meals.)

"Supper" was used for a late night snack with a cup of tea or hot milk.

I reckon I'd make a good candidate for "Grumpy Old Men"
01-11-2016, 07:44 PM   #229
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QuoteOriginally posted by p38arover Quote
I agree about -ink"!

However, "tea" was the term used for the evening meal when I was growing up in the Fifties. I didn't start using "dinner" until the Seventies. When I was growing up, "dinner" was the hot midday meal, usually on Sunday. We didn't get a hot midday meal on any other day. (Unlike some countries, Australian schools don't generally provide meals.)

"Supper" was used for a late night snack with a cup of tea or hot milk.

The inability of the young to speak without using the word "like" does also irk.

I reckon I'd make a good candidate for "Grumpy Old Men"
You're quite correct of course. Dinner has always signified the main meal of the day, and originally, that main meal was the mid-day meal. A 130 years ago it was Breakfast, Morning Tea, Dinner (later called Luncheon, now Lunch) Afternoon tea (Which has come to mean dinner here) and Supper, which was the last evening meal.

01-11-2016, 07:50 PM   #230
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10am - Morning Tea
3pm - Afternoon Tea

(for our US Cousins, read coffee break)

For many years in Head Office, we had a Tea Lady who'd move around the office with a trolley with an urn of hot water, tea, coffee, milk, sugar, and biscuits. Alas, the tea lady disappeared years ago.


Last edited by p38arover; 01-12-2016 at 01:12 AM.
01-12-2016, 12:42 AM - 1 Like   #231
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Tea on the table at 6...
01-12-2016, 01:15 AM   #232
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Another thing I really hate is the increasing use of the term "bathroom" instead of "toilet" in TV programmes and news reports. That's a US term. They are not public bathrooms, they are public toilets, there are no bathing facilities.

I once had a woman ask me at work if there was a bathroom on the railway station where I worked. I told her there wasn't. Now had she asked for the toilet.....

01-12-2016, 01:42 AM - 1 Like   #233
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Our when our occassional US visitors ask to take a shower
they are asked to put it back when they are finished with it
My young daughter delighted in showing them to the bathroom instead of the bog

Last edited by Transit; 01-12-2016 at 01:48 AM.
01-12-2016, 02:22 AM   #234
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QuoteOriginally posted by p38arover Quote
However, "tea" was the term used for the evening meal when I was growing up in the Fifties. I didn't start using "dinner" until the Seventies. When I was growing up, "dinner" was the hot midday meal, usually on Sunday. We didn't get a hot midday meal on any other day. (Unlike some countries, Australian schools don't generally provide meals.)
Here in the North East of England, it's still very common to refer to the three meals of the day as breakfast / dinner / tea in that order - i.e. dinner = lunch, tea = er... dinner I also remember men of the family being packed off to work with their "bait" - a term referring to the packed meal they would take to eat part way through their shift.
01-12-2016, 03:40 AM   #235
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Evening meal, for me, is tea while Bestbeloved calls it dinner. I don't help by calling all drinks 'tea' - 'would you like tea?' 'Yes please.' 'Tea or coffee?'

My meal I used to take to work was always 'Crouse'.
01-12-2016, 04:07 AM   #236
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QuoteOriginally posted by p38arover Quote
10am - Morning Tea
3pm - Afternoon Tea

(for our US Cousins, read coffee break)

For many years in Head Office, we had a Tea Lady who'd move around the office with a trolley with an urn of hot water, tea, coffee, milk, sugar, and biscuits. Alas, the tea lady disappeared years ago.
Speaking of tea, a few years ago, on a rather up-market safari experience, we were accompanied by a tea bearer on our morning walks. We almost got a whiplash from the jolt back through the decades

Decade - do you say /ˈdek.eɪd/ or /dekˈeɪd/?
01-12-2016, 04:43 AM   #237
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We used breakfast, lunch and tea more when I was younger (circa 50 years ago), now tea is more an informal meal had at home whereas Dinner is something we go out for. Dinner also applies in various ways to more formal meals. We have dinner parties, we never invite our friends over for tea, unless we mean mid afternoon brewed beverages with some sort of sweet cakes or elegant crustless sandwiches. ''Back in the day'' (another phrase that wrankles) we had Sunday Lunch at midday-ish. The usual scenario was to put the lamb or chicken in the oven before going to church and to return to the cooked meal. Alas both the Sunday roast and church have both lapsed from my life. (less alas about the mass than the meal though) I think Mum (not Mom) used to pluck the chickens, but my memory may be getting hazy.

---------- Post added 12th Jan 2016 at 22:45 ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by john.margetts Quote
My meal I used to take to work was always 'Crouse'.
Work meals were always known as 'crib' in Melbourne/Victorian vernacular. Builders lunch sheds are still called Árib huts

Last edited by wizofoz; 01-12-2016 at 04:49 AM.
01-12-2016, 04:47 AM   #238
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Wiz, I could have written all that almost word for word, except for the church attendance lapsing.
I can't remember the last time I came home for a roast on Sunday, mores the pity. (or is that 'more's the pity' (and what does it mean anyway!))
01-12-2016, 04:56 AM   #239
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Rod, I think I can learn more from an hour spent on PF than any church can teach me, but let's leave that aside. I have no idea of the origin of 'More's the pity'. (More is the pity) Surely it cannot be 'Mores' the pity, what do someones morals (mores') have to do with it? Nor do I think it has anything to do with ex James Bond/The Saint actors named Roger.

---------- Post added 12th Jan 2016 at 23:03 ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by savoche Quote
Decade - do you say /ˈdek.eɪd/ or /dekˈeɪd/?
That depends if you pronounce it correctly or not Is it Pro- Nounce or pronounce
01-12-2016, 05:05 AM   #240
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QuoteOriginally posted by wizofoz Quote
''Back in the day" (another phrase that wrankles)
I've noticed our youth referring to music from "back in the day" like its in some long lost golden era in history, when they're actually referring to five or ten years ago. I guess it *is* quite a while ago for them, but I still roll my eyes...
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