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01-17-2009, 09:45 AM   #1
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Keeping your hands warm during outdoor winter shooting

How do you do it? Wearing gloves seem to get in the way of operating the camera controls. I use a K200D and don't have large hands, but still...

Thanks

01-17-2009, 09:53 AM   #2
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If you don't want to buy the fingerless gloves with a mitt like cover, consider this option:

Thinner neoprene gloves with textured/rubberized grip are very warm, since they trap the heat... check out places that sell tactical gear, windsurfing clothing, hunting clothing, etc. I would recommend a wrist closure to ensure it doesn't slip.

I've photographed Elk for two hours (it takes a while to get that close) in 16F weather (discounting wind chill) in an open field using neoprene gloves, and only near the end was I starting to feel cold in the hands. Of course, I am not really moving much, so please keep that in mind... very little heat is generated with that kind of shooting. The only thing I couldn't do with the gloves on is easily swap memory cards.

Regards,
Marc
01-17-2009, 10:57 AM   #3
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I wear thin undergloves (I've got merino wool and polypropylene pairs) under a wind/waterproof fleece-backed outer pair. Together they are toasty at -5C, but with the outer pair removed the undergloves give full dexterity and will keep my hands warm enough for quite a while, even with metal-bodied cameras.
01-17-2009, 12:01 PM   #4
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Can someone point me to some good links ?

I'm searching for a pair of good gloves for a while now but can't seem to find.

Only find these Lowepro - Photo Gloves
but they look like they are going to be on way of operating the camera controls.

01-17-2009, 12:11 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by netuser Quote
Can someone point me to some good links ?

I'm searching for a pair of good gloves for a while now but can't seem to find.

Only find these Lowepro - Photo Gloves
but they look like they are going to be on way of operating the camera controls.
These are definitely too thin for colder weather. I'll try to dig up some links. Please be patient on this, since I'm somewhat limited in my time today.

Regards,
Marc
01-17-2009, 12:48 PM   #6
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The problems I had with neoprene gloves was that I could never find a pair that did not restrict the circulation in my fingers..I have fat, but short fingers..The ones that were large enough to not restrict circulation had too much air space in them to work properly..

The principles which behind neoprene fabric works is that a layer of water (ocean, lakes, rivers), or a layer of sweat ( uses other than diving, water sports) is trapped between the inner surface of the garment and the user's body..This trapped layer of moisture then acts as an insulating layer to trap body heat, releasing it slowly..To truly work at 100% the trapped layer of moisture needs to be uniform, without any air pockets or breaks..

I would caution anyone trying these that has any kind of circulatory problems to have a backup system available the first couple of times testing neoprene gloves out in actual conditions..Especially, very cold conditions..I have poor circulation in my hands due to minor frostbite exposure when I was young..For me neoprene just did not work out..

For the coldest weather, what I finally settled on was thin silk glove liners over which I wear thin polypropylene glove liners; taking great care that the polypro liners do not bind at any place on my hands..Over these two inner layers I wear any number of differing combinations of heavier gloves, mittens, and mitten shells..Layering is the key to warmth, depending on the level of exercise/body heat being generated during the activity in question..

I often use hunter's mittens that have a flap in the palm that allows for a quick removal of the mitten, which then exposes one's hands which are encased in a lighter layer that provides for the greater dexterity needed for something like operating a camera..When done with the activity requiring dexterity, the mitten, which hangs around the wrist, is easily pulled back over the hands in the glove liners..

Bruce

Last edited by baltochef920; 01-17-2009 at 02:43 PM.
01-17-2009, 12:57 PM   #7
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ARAMARK - Convertible Glove-Mitts
Neosport 3/4 Finger Paddling Glove from Campmor

01-17-2009, 01:12 PM   #8
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I haven't had the need yet, last year I didn't take many pictures and this year we are having a heatwave. It was 69F the other night at midnight with a high of 78F during the day. We should be in the 20 degrees below that and no rain.
01-17-2009, 01:16 PM   #9
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I have a pair of goretex mittens with rubber grip and fleece inside where the fingers and thumbs can easilly be moved through a whole (where ottherwise the material overlap to trap the body heat). The thumb has it separate whole. Since it is easy to mover the fingers in and out of the mitten without removing it or without help from the other hand I can easilly slide the fingers in and out as I need them to do something with the camera. They have served me well down to -25C and up to 90N. Some time though since I baught my last pair so I have no link, but I think they are made by Helly Hansen.
01-17-2009, 01:33 PM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by Marc Langille Quote
These are definitely too thin for colder weather. I'll try to dig up some links. Please be patient on this, since I'm somewhat limited in my time today.

Regards,
Marc
Many thanks Marc.

I really don't know if in fact those might be good for me (meaning not being fingerless).

I only need gloves in the Azores during late night or very early morning while "hunting" for photos so the thin part might not apply to me.

I use now just some normal fingerless gloves but then they get all wet from night/morning moisture and do more bad then good to my fingers/hands. That is why I'm searching for a while now for some good ones.
01-17-2009, 01:57 PM   #11
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Vav, I use a pair of silk liner gloves inside either mittens (if it's really cold) or good ski gloves (if it's only somewhat cold) About 20 years or so ago I severly frostbit both hands. Fortunately I didn't lose any fingers but I did destroy a good bit of the warming circulation in my fingers, so I have to take great care when out in the cold. I've found silk liner gloves allow me to operate my camera easily and keep my hands warm enough as long as I don't keep them out more than a few minutes at a time. I buy mine a Cabelas, an online hunting/fishing/camping store. They are relatively inexpensive, but a warning, they are thin silk and don't stand up well to any rough environments. As long as they are protected by an outer glove/mitten they are great, but don't attempt to do anything more than operate your camera with them. Here is the link Cabela's Silk Glove Liners

NaCl(they work for me)H2O
01-17-2009, 01:58 PM   #12
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Thanks to Marc, Talisker and all other members for your suggestions.

Regards,
01-17-2009, 02:14 PM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by Marc Langille Quote
If you don't want to buy the fingerless gloves with a mitt like cover, consider this option:

Thinner neoprene gloves with textured/rubberized grip are very warm, since they trap the heat... check out places that sell tactical gear, windsurfing clothing, hunting clothing, etc. I would recommend a wrist closure to ensure it doesn't slip.

[snip]

Regards,
Marc
Here is a link to an online store that sells tactical and military surplus equipment. Scroll down to the last entry for (camo) neoprene gloves.

Barre Army/Navy Store Shopping Cart

While I have purchased frequently from this store over many years and been satisfied, I have never actually owned this style of gloves. I use thin polypropylene liner gloves and a thicker fleece outer glove that I remove to operate my camera and replace when waiting.

I have purchased outdoor gear from Campmor for many years and been very pleased with their prices and service. I am not familiar with the other two outfitters.
01-17-2009, 04:14 PM   #14
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Shooting in the cold can be tough if it is severe cold. I'm a truck fleet mechanic and have the same issues while at work and sometimes you just have to take the gloves off to do things. I don't know what temps you're going to be out in but the Mechanix gloves sold in most auto stores and hardware stores are good down to the low 20's F. Colder than that you need something heavier. The fingerless glove/mitten work good and the warehouse selectors who work in the freezer for 8 hr shifts use them. I have a fairly snug fitting pair of polarfleece gloves that I can use just about all the controls on my camera with. I used them the other day at around 5 deg F and they worked fairly well for about a 1/2 hour but after that my fingertips started freezing and had to get in the truck for a bit. They were about 5 bucks at Walmart. I can operate the K10D control wheels and shutter with heavy gloves but I can't push the smaller menu buttons. I buy the Hot Hands packs and keep them in my gloves in severe cold so when I have to take them off my hands will warm up quickly when I put the gloves back on. The packs last for about 4 hours. They work good in your boots also.
01-17-2009, 04:21 PM   #15
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Hands in pockets until last minute, you can also get those warm pack things, just bend em they got hot.
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