Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
12-19-2012, 02:23 PM   #16
Senior Member




Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Far North Qld, Australia
Posts: 179
I read the manual for the K30 on the train today and discovered something great (yay for reading manuals!); something I had on my Kx and was disappointed to think it was lacking on the K30.

Follow these steps to achieve consistent in-focus shots using manual lenses:

1. Go into Menu and enable Catch in Focus (under number 3 of the Custom tab)
2. Set the camera to AF-S (AF-A must be disabled in the menu. I believe its disabled by default)
3. Compose your shot and with the scene still out of focus, press the shutter button - It wont take the photo yet.
4. While still pressing the shutter button, rotate the focus ring. As soon as the shot is in focus, the camera will take the photo.

This is great for capturing in focus images using manual glass if you dont feel like using focus peaking.

*Apologies if this is common knowledge but it was useful to me so i thought id share.

12-20-2012, 06:37 AM   #17
Veteran Member




Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 698
QuoteOriginally posted by curlednoodles Quote
I read the manual for the K30 on the train today and discovered something great (yay for reading manuals!); something I had on my Kx and was disappointed to think it was lacking on the K30.

Follow these steps to achieve consistent in-focus shots using manual lenses:

1. Go into Menu and enable Catch in Focus (under number 3 of the Custom tab)
2. Set the camera to AF-S (AF-A must be disabled in the menu. I believe its disabled by default)
3. Compose your shot and with the scene still out of focus, press the shutter button - It wont take the photo yet.
4. While still pressing the shutter button, rotate the focus ring. As soon as the shot is in focus, the camera will take the photo.

This is great for capturing in focus images using manual glass if you dont feel like using focus peaking.

*Apologies if this is common knowledge but it was useful to me so i thought id share.
he other way, which in most cases I find more convenient, mostly because it allows you to recompose after focusing:
1. set the camera to AF-S, point the camera at the point you want to focus on
2. half press and keep half pressed the shutter
3. Turn the focus ring until the red focusing square in the middle of the viewfinder lights and the camera beeps. The green hexagon in the viewfinder should also illuminate and stay on
4. Recompose the shot.
5. Press the shutter all the way to shoot

In step 3 sometimes you might overshoot after reaching correct focus. Just finely adjust the focus further about that point and make sure the green hexagon in the viewfinder stays illuminated.

Once you recompose (if you do) the green hexagon may go out, but that is just because your focus point is no longer at the centre of the viewfinder, so the focus sensor is now seeing something else that might not be in focus.

The problem with the catch in focus method is that it does not let you recompose, so you can only get a good shot if the area you intend to focus on is actually in the centre of the picture. You have to use the centre pont with non-af lenses, you cannot focus on another point of the image by selecting one of the other 10 focus points.
12-21-2012, 03:41 AM   #18
Senior Member




Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Far North Qld, Australia
Posts: 179
QuoteOriginally posted by lister6520 Quote
The problem with the catch in focus method is that it does not let you recompose, so you can only get a good shot if the area you intend to focus on is actually in the centre of the picture.
This is true but I almost always compose my shot before pressing the shutter.
12-21-2012, 05:01 PM   #19
Veteran Member




Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 698
QuoteOriginally posted by curlednoodles Quote
This is true but I almost always compose my shot before pressing the shutter.
Not sure you got what I mean about the issue with catch-in-focus.

Let's say you are shooting a photo of two people with a distant background, one is to the left and one to the right. At the centre of the image is the distant background.
You compose the shot, having none of the persons in the centre, that means that the centre focus point (the only one usable with a manual lens) is pointed at the distant background.
You press the shutter - nothing happens yet because the lens is not yet in focus.
You turn the focus ring, at some point in time the focus sensor determines that it is in focus and the shutter releases instantly.

You now have a photo with a perfectly focused background but the two people that were meant to be your subject are out of focus.

Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
exif, info, k-30, k-50, lenses, pentax k30, pentax k50
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
K-30 and manual or older K and M42 lenses tammons Pentax K-30 & K-50 11 09-19-2012 08:38 AM
A beginner seeking help on first lenses with first DSLR (K-30) Mr008 Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 25 09-13-2012 05:07 AM
K-30 with an older external flash misbehave Pentax K-30 & K-50 8 07-16-2012 03:06 PM
A question about older Pentax lenses on a DSLR. Dewman Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 9 05-16-2012 03:48 PM
Lens compatibility confirmation: Will my MZ-30 lenses work on K-x or K-r? cinz Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 6 12-26-2011 02:16 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:49 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top