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12-03-2014, 10:45 PM   #1
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Thinking of getting B+W Clear UV filter for k-50 kit lens, any advice or experience?

I am thinking about this particular model at $26:

B+W 52mm Clear UV Haze with Multi-Resistant Coating (010M)

Does it affect your quality?

Is it durable?

Dust magnet?

My main concern is to protect the lens as this is my first DSLR and I might be prone to unintentional mistake.... Better safe than sorry...

By the way the lens are DA L18-55 and 50-200

Thank you!

12-03-2014, 11:01 PM   #2
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Although open to considerable debate at times the general consensus is that 'protection' filters are not required on modern lenses. UV Haze filters were standard on film cameras because they served a useful purpose optically and on older film lenses the front coatings were not as tough as modern ones. Neither of those functions are needed on a modern lens.

All filters will reduce the optical quality of the image. With the better quality filters the degradation may be small or even unnoticeable in many situations. But in other situations they will cause flare, ghosts and other aberrations.

If you are worried about scratching your lens a lens hood provides similar protection and as opposed to a filter actually improves the image quality.

I don't have a filter on any lens i own. I do use CPL filters and ND filters when required. My rule is use a filter if it provides an optical benefit you need, otherwise no filters. I have also used 'protection' filters at Yellowstone to avoid acidic spray and sometimes at the coast if the wind is up and blowing.

Bottom line use a filter or not as you feel comfortable but understand the consequences and when you should take them off. B+W is a well known, quality brand. I have several CPL's from them and have been satisfied. You might also look into optically clear 'protection' filters instead of the UV haze ones.
12-03-2014, 11:19 PM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by jatrax Quote
Although open to considerable debate at times the general consensus is that 'protection' filters are not required on modern lenses. UV Haze filters were standard on film cameras because they served a useful purpose optically and on older film lenses the front coatings were not as tough as modern ones. Neither of those functions are needed on a modern lens.

All filters will reduce the optical quality of the image. With the better quality filters the degradation may be small or even unnoticeable in many situations. But in other situations they will cause flare, ghosts and other aberrations.

If you are worried about scratching your lens a lens hood provides similar protection and as opposed to a filter actually improves the image quality.

I don't have a filter on any lens i own. I do use CPL filters and ND filters when required. My rule is use a filter if it provides an optical benefit you need, otherwise no filters. I have also used 'protection' filters at Yellowstone to avoid acidic spray and sometimes at the coast if the wind is up and blowing.

Bottom line use a filter or not as you feel comfortable but understand the consequences and when you should take them off. B+W is a well known, quality brand. I have several CPL's from them and have been satisfied. You might also look into optically clear 'protection' filters instead of the UV haze ones.
Is this the correct hood?

Amazon.com : Fotodiox Lens Hood for Pentax Ph-Rba SMC DA 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 AL II Zoom Lens (Replaces Pentax 38741) : Camera Lens Hoods : Camera & Photo

Also, is it standard? Like there are no higher grades of hood?

How about in terms of contamination?

It is winter now, if snow or wind blows debris at the front element, would it damage it?
12-04-2014, 12:14 AM   #4
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You have walked into one of the most intense debates on this or any other photo-oriented forum.

You have heard one side. I'll give another. No, you will not notice image degradation from a high quality, multi-coated filter. B+W makes good filters. A protection filter is not a necessary addition to your gear but it won't hurt anything and it might just help if you have small, grabby kids around or shoot in areas that might have blowing dust, salt spray or other flying debris. It is much easier to clean a flat filter surface than the curved, high cost lens. Oh, and it might give a bit of peace-of-mind for someone who is "prone to unintentional mistakes." Any impact on images will be at the microscopic level, only noticeable when "pixel peeping" at extreme magnification - if at all. A number of well known pros who shoot outdoors filter their lenses as a matter of course.

If it gives you more confidence, just do it.

12-04-2014, 12:31 AM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by abmj Quote
You have walked into one of the most intense debates on this or any other photo-oriented forum.

You have heard one side. I'll give another. No, you will not notice image degradation from a high quality, multi-coated filter. B+W makes good filters. A protection filter is not a necessary addition to your gear but it won't hurt anything and it might just help if you have small, grabby kids around or shoot in areas that might have blowing dust, salt spray or other flying debris. It is much easier to clean a flat filter surface than the curved, high cost lens. Oh, and it might give a bit of peace-of-mind for someone who is "prone to unintentional mistakes." Any impact on images will be at the microscopic level, only noticeable when "pixel peeping" at extreme magnification - if at all. A number of well known pros who shoot outdoors filter their lenses as a matter of course.

If it gives you more confidence, just do it.
I am too new to be judging by myself and I am making choices based on reviews and comments from professionals on this forum like you.

What would you recommend?

These stood out from my googling, what's your opinion on them?

1. $8 Tiffen http://www.amazon.com/Tiffen-52mm-UV-Protection-Filter/dp/B00004ZCJG/ref=zg_bs_499262_1
2. $15 Goja kit http://www.amazon.com/Professional-Filter-Accessory-NIKON-Cameras/dp/B0051G9...zg_bs_499262_7
3. $26 B+W Clear Multi Coat Amazon.com : B+W 52mm Clear UV Haze with Multi-Resistant Coating (010M) : Camera Lens Sky And Uv Filters : Camera & Photo
4. Multiple Variation of Hoya
12-04-2014, 02:08 AM   #6
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Lenstip is one of the few reviewers to do reviews on UV filters, flare is tested as well as light frequency graphs, it's well worth reading before choosing a filter!
12-04-2014, 02:17 AM   #7
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You don't need Skylight or other tinted filters. Best is a clear "protective" filter. Next would be UV "clear protective." Modern digital cameras do not need "skylight" or "UV Haze" filters. You are just looking for protection with the least possible impact on image quality and color.

Tiffen make decent, entry level, low cost filters. Certainly not the best but ok.

I don't know Goja so have no opinion. Looks cheap.

Hoya are good, mid-range filters but you have to look closely. They make so many different styles and qualities that it is easy to get confused. High quality, multi-coated are the best. Ken Rockwell did a revue of Hoya filters awhile back and has a pretty decent listing of the types: Hoya Filters

B+W and Marui make very good, slightly more expensive products.

Heliopan, Lee and others make very high-end, very expensive filters.

If you need to save money, Tiffen multi-coated clear protective filters would be ok for a beginner. Most of my filters are Hoya Pro-1 Super HMC in the thin ring design. I prefer the thin mounting ring as they are less likely to cause any vignetting than the thicker filter mounts. HTH.

Last edited by abmj; 12-04-2014 at 02:24 AM.
12-04-2014, 03:45 AM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by Hexism Quote
I am too new to be judging by myself and I am making choices based on reviews and comments from professionals on this forum like you.

What would you recommend?

These stood out from my googling, what's your opinion on them?

1. $8 Tiffen Amazon.com : Tiffen 52mm UV Protection Filter : Camera Lens Sky And Uv Filters : Camera & Photo
2. $15 Goja kit Amazon.com : 52MM Professional Lens Filter Accessory Kit for NIKON D7100 D7000 D5200 D5100 D5000 D3300 D3200 D3100 D3000 D90 D80 DSLR Cameras - Includes: Vivitar Filter Kits (UV, CPL, FLD) + Carry Pouch + Tulip Lens Hood + Snap-On Lens Cap w/ Cap Kee
3. $26 B+W Clear Multi Coat Amazon.com : B+W 52mm Clear UV Haze with Multi-Resistant Coating (010M) : Camera Lens Sky And Uv Filters : Camera & Photo
4. Multiple Variation of Hoya
I agree with abmj

if you are going to use a filter to protect your lens, from the above options I would use the B+W option. for a bit less money but almost same Quality i would use a Sigma EX DG multicoated or a Marumi multicoated. for me, B+W is the best. My DA* lenses have one of these at all times. the difference in quality image is negligible in my opinion but they are easy to clean (multicoated) and i never have to touch the front glass. i tried with less expensive filters before but i was not happy because they degraded the image quality and were dust collectors.

12-04-2014, 10:50 AM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by Dave's clichés Quote
Lenstip is one of the few reviewers to do reviews on UV filters, flare is tested as well as light frequency graphs, it's well worth reading before choosing a filter!
QuoteOriginally posted by abmj Quote
You don't need Skylight or other tinted filters. Best is a clear "protective" filter. Next would be UV "clear protective." Modern digital cameras do not need "skylight" or "UV Haze" filters. You are just looking for protection with the least possible impact on image quality and color.

Tiffen make decent, entry level, low cost filters. Certainly not the best but ok.

I don't know Goja so have no opinion. Looks cheap.

Hoya are good, mid-range filters but you have to look closely. They make so many different styles and qualities that it is easy to get confused. High quality, multi-coated are the best. Ken Rockwell did a revue of Hoya filters awhile back and has a pretty decent listing of the types: Hoya Filters

B+W and Marui make very good, slightly more expensive products.

Heliopan, Lee and others make very high-end, very expensive filters.

If you need to save money, Tiffen multi-coated clear protective filters would be ok for a beginner. Most of my filters are Hoya Pro-1 Super HMC in the thin ring design. I prefer the thin mounting ring as they are less likely to cause any vignetting than the thicker filter mounts. HTH.
QuoteOriginally posted by Rudy Quote
I agree with abmj

if you are going to use a filter to protect your lens, from the above options I would use the B+W option. for a bit less money but almost same Quality i would use a Sigma EX DG multicoated or a Marumi multicoated. for me, B+W is the best. My DA* lenses have one of these at all times. the difference in quality image is negligible in my opinion but they are easy to clean (multicoated) and i never have to touch the front glass. i tried with less expensive filters before but i was not happy because they degraded the image quality and were dust collectors.
Here is the link with summary of detailed reviews of lens filter.

However, I can't really find the top one available in US.

UV filters test - Description of the results and summary - Lenstip.com

So, is this the B+W best choice for $26?

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0000BZL47
12-04-2014, 11:05 AM   #10
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For a digital camera, clear filters are unnecessary, costly, and can cause glare and/or reflection problems.

I have one for every lens I own.
12-04-2014, 11:49 AM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by AquaDome Quote
For a digital camera, clear filters are unnecessary, costly, and can cause glare and/or reflection problems.

I have one for every lens I own.
What?

You are contradicting yourself.

So should I buy it or not?
12-04-2014, 11:58 AM   #12
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I use a Marumi CP filter occasionally as it produces results unobtainable any other way, but would never use any other filter for one reason...... it's far more likely to get scratched than the lens is, so if it gets scratched I'll have to buy another!
12-04-2014, 12:01 PM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by Hexism Quote
... You are contradicting yourself...
He was joking.
12-04-2014, 12:27 PM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by abmj Quote
He was joking.
One question though, my kit lens are WR.

So, does this mean the front element is WR too? Is it resistant to snow if I were to take picture and there are light snow that falls on the front element?
12-04-2014, 12:32 PM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by Hexism Quote
What?

You are contradicting yourself.

So should I buy it or not?
I am not contradicting myself. I really did purchase filters with every lens. I still have all of them. They're back in their original boxes.

I used UV Haze filters on my film lenses back in the day. When I invested in digital, I bought filters for everything. I was certain any lens that didn't have a filter on it was going to be destroyed by dust or flying insects or coffee-splatter or my cats or whatever else. Eventually, after I had to remove a filter every time I saw some glare or reflection, I just quit putting them back on the lenses. I no longer have lens-filter anxiety.

I still use a UV Haze filter when shooting on film.
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