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01-28-2016, 10:33 AM   #31
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QuoteOriginally posted by pathdoc Quote
I'd love to know what the long term service life of these cameras was.
The ad quotes at least 5 years of use ... There are a few XR-S on eBay at the moment, I notice. One of them claims to still be working, perhaps on it's internal batteries.

Another eBay sample of the XR- S has the solar panels covered in black electrical tape, so perhaps over time some problems emerged with the solar panels.

But I like the concept. Solar panel efficiency has come a long way over the last few decades.

01-28-2016, 10:41 AM - 4 Likes   #32
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QuoteOriginally posted by madbrain Quote
That's great for you - not everyone has the same needs.
Exactly. And did you stop to think that goes both ways?

If you insist about what you want understand that others don't want or need the same thing as you. And everything is fine, you made a post about it. But it's not fine when someone comes and says he doesn't need the same thing and you become aggressive.

Now, i understand you payed a bit for that adapter (i did also) and want to reuse it until the end of days but if you see it's not possible don't get that constipated over this AA matter.
Really, is this feature that important that one would fret about it on internet forums?
The feature is nice in theory but to be honest i never (in 5 years) really needed on my K-r it and i do travel a lot and spend weekends in the mountains. Only in very cold weather i needed the adapter a few times, but that could have very well been a spare Li-Ion battery (cost-wise as well).

Let me ask you, have you ever thought about it in an engineering way? I guess not. Inside a camera so complex and with so many features the sapce must be optimized and with the D-BH109 you didn't quite have that. You just shout i want this and that and sound like a spoiled brat whilst doing it. Every cubic inch of space must be used wisely (because most prefer smaller size, lighter photo camera - look at the mirrorless popularity nonsense, why do you think that is happening) so the more features you want the harder this issue of optimizing the space inside the body becomes.

Anyway.. yeah, i should probably get that cute facepaw image bertwert keeps using and use that in situations like these.
01-29-2016, 07:10 PM   #33
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QuoteOriginally posted by wizofoz Quote
I only ever had one Pentax camera that did not have a battery grip. If the forthcoming 35mm cam doesn not have BG option I will be flabberghasted. I like that I can insert AA batteries in the grip in an emergency, but I would never rely on them for day to day use.
I have relied on the AA eneloops exclusively and have been very happy.
Certainly, having an optional battery grip that supports AA would be a welcome feature to me.
I'm just saying that I would like the camera itself to support AAs optionally as well, without the grip.
I have carried a grip with my K200D before, which gave me an additional 4AAs to the 4AAs inside the camera. It made the camera a little large, though.

QuoteQuote:
I have never shot a video clip longer than a few minutes and have zero interest in doing so. If I were primarily interested in video, I would probably buy a video camera.
Yes, I have tried that. Have you looked at the size of the sensors on most consumer video cameras ? They don't produce the same kind of image as APS-C or full frame sensors. And I can't afford the $5,000 - $15,000 pro video cameras that have larger sensors, and are also too bulky to carry. You may not be aware that many independent movies that have had theatrical releases have been shot with Canon DSLRs (FF or not). An FF DSLR that produces good video at a lower price point is a big deal, IMO.

QuoteQuote:
Sorry my friend, I disagree. No on board flash is very acceptable to me. I have many flash options I can use if I need to mount them on board. However, if it were me designing the cam I would try to make it with multiple options for the prism mount. different viewfinders, a module one can plug in for flash, one for GPS and wifi, etc..But these are old ideas from film era cams.
Sure, if you are a pro and don't mind carrying a lot of equipment, it's acceptable. When I go on a vacation, I don't necessarily want to carry the biggest camera with both a grip and flash.
There is a time and place for both. I agree with you about different viewfinders though - I think that would be great. And the GPS and Wifi are perfectly fine as optional modules.
But when it comes to flash, a pop-up flash costs little and doesn't add much bulk to the camera, and probably little cost to it, even if you never use it. I think it's a bad idea for Pentax to have taken it out. There is no upside to this for customers, only extra expense for a separate flash, and being forced to carry more equipment. Having pop-up flash doesn't exclude the possibility of having an off-board flash, as cameras have been able to for decades.

Re: wifi, I would rather not have Wifi in the camera at all, given the very poor quality and proprietary nature of the Wifi camera software I have seen, and the fact that these Wifi camera apps likely won't work anymore 5-10 years from now on the next gen operating systems.

Ultimately, having every feature be modular comes at a cost though, it tends to make the camera bigger. And it may well cost more. Wifi and GPS chips are tiny and inexpensive these days.

QuoteQuote:
Videos stuff? whatever.

Same as reply for 4

It seems to me we have vastly different needs/wants from any iteration of a Pentax 35mm camera. It may be maybe a generational thing.
I don't know if it's a generational thing. A lot of people like to capture things on video these days. It's fine if you don't.
When I shoot videos, I would rather have a good picture, with a good size sensor and lens, than a poor one, shot with a cell phone.
The cell phones do especially poorly indoors due to small sensors and poor optics. Whereas a DSLR with a decent lens can do wonders.

---------- Post added 01-29-16 at 06:22 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Penumbra Quote
Exactly. And did you stop to think that goes both ways?

If you insist about what you want understand that others don't want or need the same thing as you. And everything is fine, you made a post about it. But it's not fine when someone comes and says he doesn't need the same thing and you become aggressive.

Now, i understand you payed a bit for that adapter (i did also) and want to reuse it until the end of days but if you see it's not possible don't get that constipated over this AA matter.
Really, is this feature that important that one would fret about it on internet forums?
The feature is nice in theory but to be honest i never (in 5 years) really needed on my K-r it and i do travel a lot and spend weekends in the mountains. Only in very cold weather i needed the adapter a few times, but that could have very well been a spare Li-Ion battery (cost-wise as well).

Let me ask you, have you ever thought about it in an engineering way? I guess not. Inside a camera so complex and with so many features the sapce must be optimized and with the D-BH109 you didn't quite have that. You just shout i want this and that and sound like a spoiled brat whilst doing it. Every cubic inch of space must be used wisely (because most prefer smaller size, lighter photo camera - look at the mirrorless popularity nonsense, why do you think that is happening) so the more features you want the harder this issue of optimizing the space inside the body becomes.

Anyway.. yeah, i should probably get that cute facepaw image bertwert keeps using and use that in situations like these.
I'm an engineer myself, albeit software, not hardware. So of course I think about it. I I mentioned earlier that the shape of the adapter was not optimal in this very thread. Read the earlier posts. Having the AA batteries lined up would be better than crossed. And doing so may not necessitate an adapter at all in a larger FF body.

This has really nothing to do with the cost of the adapter. I just bought a bunch from China from ebay, they are dirt cheap. I bought the non-OEM ones. Some broke before as they are cheap plastic parts. But since you can get 10 cheap adapters from China for the price of one OEM, it doesn't really matter if one breaks.

I have never used the LiOn battery with my former K-r and now K-30, except to test it. I have only ever run the camera with eneloops.

I couldn't care less about reusing the same adapter in the next camera. I will be happy to stop using the cheap adapters. I preferred the K200D which just accepted the AA batteries without the use of an adapter - but of course it didn't support Lion at all, which wouldn't fly today with some (but sure would be fine for me). What I do care about is being able to use the AA eneloops in the camera body, without having to carry a battery grip, which adds bulk (and cost, but that is secondary).
I would rather have a slightly larger FF camera body that can accommodate AAs inside, than carry a battery grip.

I think an engineer could design a rectangular shape space in the FF camera big enough for 4 AAs , which could also accept one large LiOn battery in the same space, or 2 smaller LiOn batteries (not in series, one as backup). It would only takes a few springs and a few additional contacts.

---------- Post added 01-29-16 at 06:36 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by fredralphfred Quote
I hate to state the obvious here, guys, but you can purchase MORE THAN ONE AA ADAPTER and pre-load them, then "pretend" they're Lithium-Ion batteries.
Yes, that's what I did. I had 3 adapters, which were lost, along with my K-30 , recently. I just bought 6 more adapters on ebay for less than $20 (the price of 2 sets of eneloops).

QuoteQuote:
As the post on the first page stated (although the author didn't realize it), you have nearly the same amount of energy in each package -- 4xAA vs. the Pentax Li battery.
I think it was pointed out later that 4 eneloop Pro AAs have more energy than the Pentax LiOn battery.

QuoteQuote:
Especially once you get a little use on lithiums because they decay much faster. NiMH batteries are much longer lasting and because you can charge each cell individually, you can optimize their charge. They're also not subject to "counting loss" problems like Li-Ion batteries (when the coulomb counter gets messed up; I assume Pentax is using "smart" Li-Ion batteries).
Exactly. I can condition and measure my AA cells. Can't do it with LiOn batteries.
All LiOn batteries I ever owned have degraded. I have had a very small number of eneloops die in 8 years out of more than 100 (I use them in many devices other than cameras).

QuoteQuote:
Now, if Pentax was willing to take the watt-hour-density "hit" to go Li-FePO4 (iron phosphate), you'd get much greater battery life in a safer package. But I think you still have to use special stickers for shipping because of the Lithium.
You're not saying that Pentax should copy what every other camera manufacturer does, are you? Sacrilege!
I would welcome new battery chemistries if they are superior to both Lithium Ion and also to NIMH.
Lithium Ion just have too many problems in terms of capacity loss and longevity. The energy density is not their #1 problem, IMO, at least not for cameras.

QuoteQuote:
I think most manufacturer's fixation with Lithium batteries is profit. They don't like standardized batteries (keep in mind that there are a LOT of different sizes of standard, rechargeable Li-Ion cells one could build a camera around if one was only interested in energy density) because they can be purchased from ANYONE. Not that there aren't knock-offs, but they're far fewer and many people are concerned that they won't handle the "smart" part correctly. By continuing to allow AA usage in their cameras, Pentax is giving their users a CHOICE -- how can that be bad? -- to pay a premium for shorter life and slightly increased energy density, or use standard batteries that will have a much longer life, much lower cost of operation, and NOT REQUIRE A SEPARATE F****** CHARGER FOR EVERY G**-D***ED DEVICE I PURCHASE!

Thank you. +1000 .
Not having to carry multiple chargers when traveling is a very big deal, and one major reason I like AA eneloops .
Same reason I don't want to carry a battery grip to load the AAs - it defeats the purpose (actually is worse, at least you can checkin the extra charger, but you have to shoot with the battery grip).
I used to have an off-board flash that took AAs eneloops as well. I sold it as the firmware was not compatible with the K-30. It was never a great flash to begin with.
The pop-up flash in the K-30 essentially meets all my needs, on the few occasions that I need flash. But I try to avoid flash and 99% of the time, don't need it, since it's a high ISO camera.
I probably won't be buying another flash.

This is why a K-3 II is a much worse travel camera, IMO. One is forced to buy and carry a separate flash, and either carry a grip for AA batteries, or travel with 2 chargers (one for the AA batteries in the flash, and one for the LiOn battery in the body). The K-30 offers vastly superior convenience.

---------- Post added 01-29-16 at 06:41 PM ----------

BTW, the FAA has been looking into the safety of traveling with loose LiOn batteries for a while.

FAA: Don't pack lithium batteries in your checked bag

This is just one more reason not to travel with Lion batteries, and to use AAs. I wouldn't want spare LiOn batteries to light a fire, or to be confiscated by the TSA.

But even when not traveling by air, the convenience and perennity of AA batteries vastly trumps LiOn.
01-31-2016, 08:35 PM   #34
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QuoteOriginally posted by rawr Quote
The ad quotes at least 5 years of use ... There are a few XR-S on eBay at the moment, I notice. One of them claims to still be working, perhaps on it's internal batteries.

Another eBay sample of the XR- S has the solar panels covered in black electrical tape, so perhaps over time some problems emerged with the solar panels.

But I like the concept. Solar panel efficiency has come a long way over the last few decades.
I still have mine. It can either take a special rechargeable silver oxide battery or 2 G13/LR44 type batteries. I can't remember how long the rechargeable battery lasted before it died, some years, but I didn't bother replacing it because it seemed a bit expensive.
It is actually possible to use it with a DIY capacitor storage cell by packaging up a suitable capacitor to fit the battery profile. If there is good enough light (or you have a bright torch to charge it in low light) you will never have to buy batteries again!

John.

02-01-2016, 12:01 AM   #35
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QuoteOriginally posted by madbrain Quote
Not having to carry multiple chargers when traveling is a very big deal, and one major reason I like AA eneloops .
Another option is USB charging. When travelling, one USB cable + someplace to plug it in = all you need to charge your camera, phone, car GPS, tablet, PS4 controller etc. No need for AA's (except for your flashes), no need for any chargers.

I wonder if Pentax will ever get into USB charging. Sony certainly has - for Alpha/NEX, RX-100, all their mobile devices. It can be very handy.

QuoteOriginally posted by jhmos Quote
I still have mine.
Interesting. I never realised they were available in Australia. Must have come out after I bought my XR2s.
02-01-2016, 02:24 AM   #36
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QuoteOriginally posted by jhmos Quote
I still have mine. It can either take a special rechargeable silver oxide battery or 2 G13/LR44 type batteries. I can't remember how long the rechargeable battery lasted before it died, some years, but I didn't bother replacing it because it seemed a bit expensive.
It is actually possible to use it with a DIY capacitor storage cell by packaging up a suitable capacitor to fit the battery profile. If there is good enough light (or you have a bright torch to charge it in low light) you will never have to buy batteries again!
Have they figured out how to make capacitors that actually last a lifetime ?
I used to have a Citizen eco-drive watch, which doesn't have a battery. But the capacitor ended up failing.
And it turns out the repair would have cost more than the value of the watch. That was the last watch I ever bought. I don't wear one anymore.

---------- Post added 02-01-16 at 01:31 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by rawr Quote
Another option is USB charging. When travelling, one USB cable + someplace to plug it in = all you need to charge your camera, phone, car GPS, tablet, PS4 controller etc. No need for AA's (except for your flashes), no need for any chargers.

I wonder if Pentax will ever get into USB charging. Sony certainly has - for Alpha/NEX, RX-100, all their mobile devices. It can be very handy.
I'm really not very enthusiastic about USB charging. First, standard USB charging is quite slow. But second, if you have multiple batteries to charge, you have to leave your camera plugged in to charge all the batteries. I think a battery charger separate from the camera is important. At least with a separate charger, you can charge one of your spare batteries in the hotel while you are out with the camera with another battery in it. Also, with AAs, if you happen to be out charged batteries, you will generally be able to buy some AA alkalines on the go that will get you a few hundred shots and can still save your day, or possibly AA lithium.
Of course, you can buy a separate LiOn battery charger, but then you are back to the issue of carrying multiple chargers of different type for each device.

Last edited by madbrain; 02-01-2016 at 02:33 AM.
02-01-2016, 04:50 AM   #37
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QuoteOriginally posted by jhmos Quote
I still have mine. It can either take a special rechargeable silver oxide battery or 2 G13/LR44 type batteries.
Do you know if the silver oxide battery is still available, and what it's called? Being able to run on LR44's would be okay, of course, but to use it in the manner it was built for would be far better.
02-01-2016, 08:38 AM   #38
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30-min. video limitation on DSLR not really tax issue

In most current DSLR designs, the camera manufacturers like to say videos are limited in length because of tax reasons, but really 30 minutes is pushing the cooling system to its limit in terms of sensor life/safety. You'll notice that cooling systems are specifically mentioned in almost all entry-level professional video camera systems. And if you watch tutorials on how to shoot "professional" video with DSLR's, many of them mention the importance of having multiple bodies to swap and adhering to short shoot times because of cooling issues.

It's expensive and difficult to suck the proper amount of heat out of the sensor for continuous usage.

Also, someone shooting a "professional" video cares a lot less about their camera being bigger than a DSLR because by the time you add-on all the crap it takes to handle a DSLR properly for video, it gets huge anyway (shoulder mount, stabilizer, focus-follower, accessory rail, etc.).

I've never actually shot video on mine, but I guess it would do a better job than most camcorders as long as I didn't need live zooming or focusing.

02-01-2016, 05:21 PM   #39
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QuoteOriginally posted by fredralphfred Quote
In most current DSLR designs, the camera manufacturers like to say videos are limited in length because of tax reasons, but really 30 minutes is pushing the cooling system to its limit in terms of sensor life/safety.
I think that's not correct for DSLRs . The heat is the excuse the manufacturers use to limit the video - taxes are the real reason they do.

Magic Lantern "auto restart" feature on my Rebel T3i works fine and the temperature has never become excessive. But the interruptions - even a fraction of a second - are simply not acceptable in a music video.

The only cameras I have really seen overheat are in cell phones - my Samsung Note 4 can't handle more than 5 minutes of 4K video for example. It has to be shut down afterwards, or undergo a 30 min cooling period. Totally impractical.

QuoteQuote:
You'll notice that cooling systems are specifically mentioned in almost all entry-level professional video camera systems. And if you watch tutorials on how to shoot "professional" video with DSLR's, many of them mention the importance of having multiple bodies to swap and adhering to short shoot times because of cooling issues.

Also, someone shooting a "professional" video cares a lot less about their camera being bigger than a DSLR because by the time you add-on all the crap it takes to handle a DSLR properly for video, it gets huge anyway (shoulder mount, stabilizer, focus-follower, accessory rail, etc.).

I've never actually shot video on mine, but I guess it would do a better job than most camcorders as long as I didn't need live zooming or focusing.
I agree that some professional accessories are large, but they are not all necessary at all times. I shoot video mainly at home on a tripod, where the size of a camera or its accessories is not really an issue, and I don't need any of the other accessories you mentioned for video.
And I'm not personally shooting professional movies. I just want video quality superior to an HD camcorder. A DSLR would be the perfect tool for the job if not for the artificial limitations like 30 the minute length.
02-01-2016, 05:41 PM   #40
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QuoteOriginally posted by madbrain Quote
I think that's not correct for DSLRs . The heat is the excuse the manufacturers use to limit the video - taxes are the real reason they do.

Magic Lantern "auto restart" feature on my Rebel T3i works fine and the temperature has never become excessive. But the interruptions - even a fraction of a second - are simply not acceptable in a music video.

The only cameras I have really seen overheat are in cell phones - my Samsung Note 4 can't handle more than 5 minutes of 4K video for example. It has to be shut down afterwards, or undergo a 30 min cooling period. Totally impractical.



I agree that some professional accessories are large, but they are not all necessary at all times. I shoot video mainly at home on a tripod, where the size of a camera or its accessories is not really an issue, and I don't need any of the other accessories you mentioned for video.
And I'm not personally shooting professional movies. I just want video quality superior to an HD camcorder. A DSLR would be the perfect tool for the job if not for the artificial limitations like 30 the minute length.
You've piqued my interest. Trying to imagine what 30+ minute music video is like. Especially if shot at home on a tripod. Have any you'd like to share?
02-01-2016, 06:56 PM   #41
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QuoteOriginally posted by madbrain Quote
I think that's not correct for DSLRs . The heat is the excuse the manufacturers use to limit the video - taxes are the real reason they do. . .
All I know is I've watched some tutorials for shooting video with a DSLR and it's been mentioned as an issue. Of course, this is for professional work, not casual videos, so they may be more picky about sensor noise. And I've heard of cases of DSLR's shutting down with heat warnings. I've watched some of Jared Polin's web videos ("Fro knows photo") and they have a guy who runs around and resets [whatever cameras they got Nikon or Canon to give them] every 30 minutes and they've never mentioned having a heat issue.

I also know that on "professional" video cameras, heat management / removal is given significant in-chassis space.

Considering those together, I'm certain it's a design issue on all models, and winds up being a problem on some, with recent models being less likely to be problematic. But probably not something the manufacturer wants to _encourage_ because heat makes nearly every problem worse. I've got a DAC on my desk that uses about 6w. It's about the size of my Panasonic LX-100 and it's quite warm to the touch. (I'm guessing 110F but can't find my temp. gun.) You can probably guess how much energy the camera draws to make videos by how long the battery lasts (I have no idea), but I wouldn't be surprised to see it being 2 or 3 watts. If the metal on the camera isn't warm to the touch, it's probably doing a poor job of removing the heat during video production.
QuoteQuote:
. . . Magic Lantern "auto restart" feature on my Rebel T3i works fine and the temperature has never become excessive. But the interruptions - even a fraction of a second - are simply not acceptable in a music video.
The only cameras I have really seen overheat are in cell phones - my Samsung Note 4 can't handle more than 5 minutes of 4K video for example. It has to be shut down afterwards, or undergo a 30 min cooling period. Totally impractical. . . .
I suspect you will find a lot of people happy it's there even with that limitation. I know I get a lot of 30-second to 4-minute videos from friends and family of babies doing things. Those without children would probably use pets. Fortunately I don't know anyone like that.
QuoteQuote:
. . . I agree that some professional accessories are large, but they are not all necessary at all times. I shoot video mainly at home on a tripod, where the size of a camera or its accessories is not really an issue, and I don't need any of the other accessories you mentioned for video.
And I'm not personally shooting professional movies. I just want video quality superior to an HD camcorder. A DSLR would be the perfect tool for the job if not for the artificial limitations like 30 the minute length.
"Tool for the job." I did work in TV production at a low-power station in southern California. I find the lengths people go to to adapt a DSLR to professional video production understandable for the hard-core guys before large-sensor video cameras became available, but almost inexcusably silly now. I think it's entirely a cost issue and you're getting what you pay for. If you're shooting home videos that long, I really don't know what to say, except that would be a LOT of 8mm reels, so suddenly the 30 min. limitation seems less . . . limiting. Don't forget that Panasonic probably cares about video more than any other camera manufacturer, because that's what sells their cameras.
02-02-2016, 01:33 AM   #42
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I have yet to prove that the FF Frame is not just a wishful thinking, and here we are, discussing the second generation.

Yup, [sarcasm] "Pentax is doomed." [/sarcasm]
02-02-2016, 03:12 AM   #43
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QuoteOriginally posted by cfraz Quote
You've piqued my interest. Trying to imagine what 30+ minute music video is like. Especially if shot at home on a tripod. Have any you'd like to share?
I mainly record multiple myself playing many takes, solo piano or harpsichord.row . No single take is 30 minutes+, usually 1-5 minutes each.
However, with multiple cameras are involved, and separate audio recorder, the synchronization is best done if the audio and video feeds are uninterrupted.
The more files there are, the more difficult the synchronization becomes when it's time to produce the final video.

I could stop/restart every camera and the audio recorder each time, but it's an inconvenience. I much prefer to play throughout uninterrupted - and sometimes I do so for hours at a time. It's not so rare that I fill the SD card for one or more cameras - but I don't keep all the footage, obviously. I'm both the performer, videographer, and audio engineer. While I'm playing, I don't want to be thinking about issues with the cameras or any of the gear.

The Pentax DSLRs doesn't stop "nicely" at 30 minutes - but with a loud mirror slap, that is heard in the audio recorder, and in the audio of every other camera, ruining whatever take is in progress. And the video doesn't auto-restart on the Pentax. I have that option in Magic lantern at least. And my HD camcorder records continuously, though it splits into files of 4GB each - but there is no break in video or audio if they are put together on a timeline.

I would really like to add a 4K camera, and I would really like it to be a Pentax . I have several lenses that I believe are FF compatible (DA 35/2.4, DA 50/1.8). I think the DA 35 woudl work better. The only 4K camera I own at this time is my cell phone - and it is not suitable. As I mentioned earlier, I tried a 4K camcorder (Sony FDR-AX33) but it went back due to some focus issues and video quality not being good enough.

---------- Post added 02-02-16 at 02:30 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by fredralphfred Quote
"Tool for the job." I did work in TV production at a low-power station in southern California. I find the lengths people go to to adapt a DSLR to professional video production understandable for the hard-core guys before large-sensor video cameras became available, but almost inexcusably silly now. I think it's entirely a cost issue and you're getting what you pay for. If you're shooting home videos that long, I really don't know what to say, except that would be a LOT of 8mm reels, so suddenly the 30 min. limitation seems less . . . limiting. Don't forget that Panasonic probably cares about video more than any other camera manufacturer, because that's what sells their cameras.
This is a home music video I'm talking about. If not for the existence of digital video cameras, it would simply not be happening at all. I would never have been able to afford the film cameras, or live within their limitations. Just because these limitations existed before, doesn't mean they have to continue. I have several 128GB cards . My old camcorder only takes 32GB cards, though. A 128GB card can store 10 hours of HD video. It would store 2.5 hours of 4K video. And there are now 256GB SD cards for $80. In the context of the amount of storage available today on removable media vs analog film/tape previously, the 30 minute limit is an anachronism, IMO. And silly also, in the context of cost of storage vs cost of the full-frame camera, that will likely cost in the $2000 - $3000 range.

Large sensors make sense IMO, especially in a home indoors environment, not to mention I'm usually recording video at night since this is strictly a hobby, not pro. I don't need especially fancy features like real-time video focus for my application. I just want the best possible video picture. I hope Pentax is the one that will deliver it at a budget I can afford and meet my video needs. Otherwise, from what I see so far, Panasonic may be the best bet with the GH4. And I don't know what they will do with the GH5 in terms of specs.

When I travel and take my camera outdoors, I typically only shoot still pictures, not video. The still camera needs to be compact enough for travel. But volume/weight is not an issue for shooting video at home. It doesn't necessarily have to be the same camera for home & travel, but it sure would make sense to avoid buying lenses of different brands.

I use the Pentax K-30 exclusively for shooting still pictures. For videos I use 3 cameras (not always at the same time, see issue above with mirror slap) : the Pentax K-30, for which I have many lenses; the Canon T3i, for which I have only one native lens, but also have a PK lens adapter for Canon that works OK for video for a few lenses, with all manual exposure & focus. I would ditch the Canon T3i if it wasn't for Magic Lantern, as its high noise performance is not that good by today's standards. Not as good as the K-30 for sure. The last one is my 8 year old Canon HG21 HD camcorder. Tiny sensor but somehow still produces an acceptable picture, and records continuously.

---------- Post added 02-02-16 at 02:32 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by drypenn Quote
I have yet to prove that the FF Frame is not just a wishful thinking, and here we are, discussing the second generation.

Yup, [sarcasm] "Pentax is doomed." [/sarcasm]
Well, you won't hear that from me
I just want Pentax to improve on video, and also retain some of the best features they have had from their older cameras.

As I mentioned before, in-body AAs on the K200D got me to choose Pentax. In-body SR was another one. If Pentax dropped the SR tomorrow, I think a lot of people would be up in arms about it. Now you know how I feel about Pentax not having in-body AAs on their latest models .
02-02-2016, 04:02 AM   #44
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Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Ho Chi Minh City, VietNam
Posts: 15
QuoteOriginally posted by madbrain Quote
1) support AA batteries in-camera (like the K-30/K-50) . Not in a battery grip. I have never bought a Pentax body that doesn't support AAs in-body, and never will, especially not if I have to pay a lot of money for one.

2) no length limit on video recording clips. 30mins is not acceptable.
Make a different version for Europe if you have to due to the tax situation on video cameras. Don't impose the 30min limitation on the rest of the world.

3) have a built-in flash . No Flash is not acceptable. I rarely use flash, but I don't want to carry an extra flash for the occasions that I do.
Either keep the astrotracer optional (it's a lot smaller than flash!) or have both flash and astrotracer built-in

4) support 4K / 60p video recording . H.265 at high bitrate would be a start, but ideally in a format with more than 8 bit per color channel.

5) support UHS-II card speeds (probably required for item #4)
If you take a look at main pentax site for the new ff, you might not post this thread **Full Frame by PENTAX | RICOH IMAGING
1. Just made it easy, a high end camera requires many features implemented without not making it a bigger, heavier body, slots for AA batteries just simply waste of space. You spend thousand dollars for the body but afraid to pay several hundreds for a backup Liion?
3. Looking at the demo snapshot for new body, I don't think a built-in flash is available
02-02-2016, 11:03 AM   #45
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Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Nevada, USA
Posts: 465
QuoteOriginally posted by madbrain Quote
I mainly record multiple myself playing many takes, solo piano or harpsichord.row . No single take is 30 minutes+, usually 1-5 minutes each.
However, with multiple cameras are involved, and separate audio recorder, the synchronization is best done if the audio and video feeds are uninterrupted.
The more files there are, the more difficult the synchronization becomes when it's time to produce the final video.

I could stop/restart every camera and the audio recorder each time, but it's an inconvenience. I much prefer to play throughout uninterrupted - and sometimes I do so for hours at a time. It's not so rare that I fill the SD card for one or more cameras - but I don't keep all the footage, obviously. I'm both the performer, videographer, and audio engineer. While I'm playing, I don't want to be thinking about issues with the cameras or any of the gear
Interesting. Editing must take a huge amount of time. I'm surprised multiple cameras (even without the 30 minute limitation) would stay in sync for hours with a separate audio recorder.
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