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07-16-2017, 03:25 PM   #46
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OK, how's this test.

All shot using a tripod.
Also used a shutter trigger to avoid movement.
Focus set on Tinkerbell sticker on vase.
All exposed according to meter on camera top.
Auto, Manual and 2 TAv images.

Image 1:
AUTO
ISO3200 F2.8 SS1/60
Full and cropped image.



Image 2:
MANUAL
Exact same settings as above. (ISO3200 F2.8 SS1/60)



Image 3:
TAv
F3.2 SS1/125 ISO3200



Image 4:
TAv
F2.8 SS1/160 ISO3200



07-16-2017, 05:42 PM   #47
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Something is wrong to my eye if those shots are at indicated meter on the camera. They all look very underexposed to me. What does the histogram for those images look like?
07-16-2017, 08:53 PM   #48
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QuoteOriginally posted by jatrax Quote
Something is wrong to my eye if those shots are at indicated meter on the camera. They all look very underexposed to me. What does the histogram for those images look like?
Image 1: (Auto)


Image 2: (Manual)


Image 3: (TAv)


Image 4: (TAv)
07-16-2017, 09:51 PM   #49
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Yep. All severely underexposed. Your histogram should be covering the bulk of the graph and preferablly hugging the right side. Yours are all hugging the left side.

There is something very wrong here. Either you have exposure compensation on for some value, you are not reading the camera meter correctly, or the meter itself is incorrect.

Take the shot as before, check the histogram. Now adjust your settings to move the histogram until there are at least some part of the graph touching the right side. Not a lot, just some of it. My guess is maybe two stops of adjustment.

---------- Post added 07-16-17 at 09:54 PM ----------

So for example on your image #4 you have ISO 3200, SS 1/160 and aperture f/2.8. Change that to ISO 3200, aperture f/2.8 and shutter speed 1/40th and see what that looks like. That's just a guess, so keep adjusting your speed until the graph hugs the right side but does not bunch up on it.

07-16-2017, 10:01 PM   #50
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QuoteOriginally posted by jatrax Quote
Yep. All severely underexposed. Your histogram should be covering the bulk of the graph and preferablly hugging the right side. Yours are all hugging the left side.

There is something very wrong here. Either you have exposure compensation on for some value, you are not reading the camera meter correctly, or the meter itself is incorrect.

Take the shot as before, check the histogram. Now adjust your settings to move the histogram until there are at least some part of the graph touching the right side. Not a lot, just some of it. My guess is maybe two stops of adjustment.

---------- Post added 07-16-17 at 09:54 PM ----------

So for example on your image #4 you have ISO 3200, SS 1/160 and aperture f/2.8. Change that to ISO 3200, aperture f/2.8 and shutter speed 1/40th and see what that looks like. That's just a guess, so keep adjusting your speed until the graph hugs the right side but does not bunch up on it.
Yeah, it's very interesting.
The first shot was on Auto, and I've rest all of my camera settings, so you'd think it would be exposing correctly.

For image 4, I left it in TAv as someone recently suggested and used the settings I would probably use in an indoor situation (like my upcoming friend's wedding), and just let the camera choose the most appropriate ISO setting to ensure correct exposure.
07-17-2017, 03:51 AM - 1 Like   #51
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Interesting, I haven't read through all the replies yet, but looking at the 1st page, the picture of the girl in white dress seems back focus by quite a bit, I used to use K-5/K-5IIs and Tamron 70-200 quite a bit and I would say auto focus system in the original K-5 was really letting the side down, I've got a lot more satisfying result after I finally got fed up and bought a K-5IIs to replace it. I actually shot my friend's wedding and his daughter's christening in very dimly lit church with the same combo using much much higher ISO like 3200 and still got acceptable results.

I'll provide you with some example of K-5IIs and Tamron 70-200 at similar settings




200MM, f4. ISO800, 1/250th




200MM, f4.5. ISO800, 1/200th




87MM, f4.5, ISO3200, 1/80th


For portrait and stuff, flash would help tremendously, in the end, photography is all about the light. learn to use (manual) bounce flash(P-TTL for bounce is just not reliable) and off camera flash and you will find your shots improve dramatically. Check out online resource like strobist.com on flickr (http://strobist.blogspot.com.au/)and youtube(I quite like Zack Arias' old one light tutorial but I think they have all but disappeared from the internet), it really helps

Last edited by elpolodiablo; 07-17-2017 at 04:09 AM.
07-17-2017, 04:10 AM   #52
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QuoteOriginally posted by elpolodiablo Quote

For portrait and stuff, flash would help tremendously, in the end, photography is all about the light. learn to use (manual) bounce flash(P-TTL for bounce is just not reliable) and off camera flash and you will find your shots improve dramatically. Check out online resource like strobist.com and youtube(I quite like Zack Arias' old one light tutorial but I think they have all but disappeared from the internet), it really helps
Thank you. I'm quite familiar with using flash (on and off the camera - see examples), but my problem was that u shot in the exact location where I was using the same settings but had ISO at 100 and getting correctly (or just slightly under) exposed images so didn't think I'd need my flash.
And what I need is something that is sharp and clean in low light situations where flash is not appropriate.
It seems my k5 struggles when I hit ISO800 and f2.8 is soft - unless it's like you said and the focus is out.
Thanks
07-17-2017, 04:15 AM   #53
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QuoteOriginally posted by elpolodiablo Quote
P-TTL for bounce is just not reliable
That is a good point, but it is only true for the K-5 (not sure about K-5 II and IIs). Bounced flash exposure worked fine in older and newer Pentax bodies. My K20D and K-3 handle P-TTL bounce very well (with the previous caveat that Auto ISO and flash don't mix well).

07-17-2017, 06:53 AM   #54
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With your vase shots, I suspect you have limited your auto ISO range to max out at 3200. That would explain why the third and fourth shots get progressively more underexposed as you increase the shutter speed, as the camera has 'run out of adjustment' in ISO and can't achieve correct exposure with the settings you've applied. The exposure on the first two looks OK to me, but I'm not sure why the first one is so much softer than the second given the settings are the same - possibly it's missed focus a bit, or you had some camera movement (edited - I just realised you used a tripod. Perhaps SR was on in the first shot?)

Last edited by speagles2; 07-17-2017 at 07:02 AM.
07-17-2017, 07:48 AM   #55
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D750 seems to be used pretty heavily for weddings, so I think it would easily accommodate your needs. That said, a K-1 could work too... though I'd argue the D750 is obviously better suited..

The D750 is more similar to the K-5 in performance.. 6.5 fps burst, 24 MP (smaller than K-1) photos, deeper buffer, smaller body size. Plus it has amenities such as the flip screen and the super AF system.

K-1 is a resolution master. 36 MP images can be thoroughly stunning with the right lenses. But I wouldn't pick it up if you value burst speed or buffer length.. or really AF tracking. You can make it work with the K-1, but it is more work.

Either one you get, you're going to have exposure issues until you figure out your metering woes.
07-17-2017, 10:28 AM   #56
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QuoteOriginally posted by jatrax Quote
Yep. All severely underexposed.
Well, # 1 is not severely underexposed. I expose my K1 and 645Z with histos like that frequently to preserve highlights.
QuoteQuote:
Your histogram should be covering the bulk of the graph and preferablly hugging the right side. Yours are all hugging the left side.
Weeeeeyelll..yeah, crudely. On a Sony camera I would certainly be more for straight ETTR, but the 645Z is known to either clip highlights quickly OR it's metering "hot", and so needs EC downwards, which is safe. The K1 is not as bad, but still is forgiving with shadow lifting. But in this case with this subject, yes, the histos are in the wrong place

QuoteQuote:
There is something very wrong here. Either you have exposure compensation on for some value, you are not reading the camera meter correctly, or the meter itself is incorrect.
I concur.

QuoteQuote:
Take the shot as before, check the histogram. Now adjust your settings to move the histogram until there are at least some part of the graph touching the right side. Not a lot, just some of it.
Or, just move it so it's at least centered, right biased.
07-17-2017, 11:08 AM   #57
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QuoteOriginally posted by texandrews Quote
I expose my K1 and 645Z with histos like that frequently to preserve highlights.
I know nothing about the 645z, but I agree with you on the K-1. Exposure is usually spot on so no need to fuss with it.
However, on the K-5 ETTR is (IMHO) necessary to make best use of the sensor. Any underexposure at all and you get a lot of noise when correcting in post. Assuming RAW images I found the jpeg representation on the LCD to leave a lot room for correction in post if you exposed a little hot. Of course that is a fine line but I almost always used + .7 exposure comp on the K-5 and K-5IIs.
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