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10-18-2015, 04:01 PM   #20266
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QuoteOriginally posted by Racer X 69 Quote
So having scoured the Interwebs for recipes I have yet to find one that uses cream.


What gives?

Well, cream and milk are not present in a lot of traditional Italian dishes - it's we who add them!


A good carbonara should only need the beaten eggs as the sauce.


Besides, we only eat it for the bacon, Shirley!

10-18-2015, 04:04 PM   #20267
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QuoteOriginally posted by Jean Poitiers Quote

Y'all be just dang jealous ... yeah, dat's da ticket !!!


Yep.


Very jealous.


The Le Mans 24 hour race has been on my bucket list for about 45 years.
10-18-2015, 04:05 PM - 1 Like   #20268
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QuoteOriginally posted by Racer X 69 Quote
It gives us more depth of field.
That's why FF guys walk around with their eyes wide open. They are trying to recreated that narrow DoF one eye in focus effect.
10-18-2015, 04:28 PM - 1 Like   #20269
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QuoteOriginally posted by normhead Quote
That's why FF guys walk around with their eyes wide open. They are trying to recreated that narrow DoF one eye in focus effect.
OK, that makes sense - now explain their mouths.

10-18-2015, 04:58 PM   #20270
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QuoteOriginally posted by savoche Quote

The word is "rundkjøring". Try saying that, umm, once?



Mrs. Racer is Norwegian.


And now I know another word in that language.


And how to pronounce it!
10-18-2015, 05:03 PM   #20271
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Coincidentally, I read this on the Beeb this morning:

Quote:

The English language has a nerve claiming to be Anglo-Saxon or a pure-breed of any sort. It’s a mishmash of dialects, languages and one-off words that come from several migrating nations—both into the British Isles and from the various nations Britain colonized—dating back to Roman times. And one of the largest influences on the development of modern-day English comes from the Vikings.

They came from Denmark, Sweden and Norway, partly to rob, partly to invade and settle, and the legacy of language they left behind remains indelibly marked in English dictionaries to this day. They even managed to secure two of the days of the week—Thursday – Thor’s Day and Tuesday – Tiw’s Day—although claims that Wednesday—Wodan’s Day—also counts are thought to be wide of the mark, as Wodan/Odin proves to have been a common figure in all Germanic and Norse mythology.

Here are 10 examples of words the Vikings taught us, whether we wanted them to or not:

Ransack
From the old norse rannsaka, which means to search a house, this is clearly a word that has come to betray more about how the owners of the houses felt to have been searched, than the merits (or otherwise) of the search itself.

Window
A vindauga is a wind-eye, referring to the ability to see things coming up outside of your home while remaining sheltered inside it. Very descriptive group, the Vikings.

Slaughter
Comes from slatra and, fittingly, that’s the Norse verb for butchery.

Aloft
Lopt is the Norse word for the sky, heaven and a loft, while á means on. So bearing something aloft means to carry them up to heaven, or the sky, or put them away until next Christmas.

Husband
A portmanteau word in which hús (house) and bóndi (occupier and tiller of soil) are fused together into a single term that is curiously quiet on the subject of wives. Húsbóndi means house-occuper (and gardener).

Blunder
The word blundra means to shut your eyes and therefore to walk around banging into things. The extra layer of meaning—to “blunder” is to make a clumsy mistake—came later, but suits the word perfectly.

Happy
Pharrell Williams didn’t manage to get this into his song, but happ is the Old Norse word for good fortune or fate. So if you’re happy (and you know it), that is because you’ve been blessed with good luck.

Heathen
Never has a word been so aptly coined. The Vikings called those people who lived on heathland or open country heiðinn, and the inference is clearly that they are hicks, backwood sorts, who have not benefitted from recent advances in modern living. That the word was later taken up by Christians and used to describe non-Christians from less civilized nations is just a reiteration of the term’s snooty origins.

Scales
This isn’t referring to fragmented sections on a fish’s skin or the system for organizing musical notes; we’re talking weighing scales. The name for these comes from skal, a word for a bowl or drinking cup. And if you’re thinking there is something familiar about this, that’s because skol (or skål) is a Viking drinking toast.

Yule
Not content with half-inching a good portion of the words that now constitute their language from their Viking invaders, the English purloined several festive customs from Scandanavia too, including jol, a pagan feast set in the depths of the winter solstice.

/Quote
10-18-2015, 06:49 PM   #20272
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The book "Mother Tongue" by Bill Bryson is quite a good and informative read - all about the English language. There'a a particular passage which I found interesting where, in the 1600's, there were so many dialects of English that "English speakers" as close as 20 miles from London could not understand "English speakers" from London. What we view as English today, is really London English, which prevailed because of the larger population. And, other than the Viking influence, English is, of course, a Germanic tongue, so many, many words have the same roots. (Like eggs and eieren - at one stage, both words were still used in English)
10-18-2015, 07:11 PM   #20273
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QuoteOriginally posted by Jean Poitiers Quote
Another cheap & young bottle of Bordeaux "bites the dust" ... boom, boom, boom, another one bites the ... well, you know the rest, Freddy.
Perhaps you really meant this:


10-18-2015, 09:57 PM   #20274
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QuoteOriginally posted by FantasticMrFox Quote
You mean this one in England?
Magic Roundabout, Swindon. Near where I work.
10-18-2015, 10:55 PM   #20275
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And then Mark, there all the saffer and kiwi variations - which might be spelt the same as London English but are unrecognisable in pronunciation.
10-18-2015, 11:00 PM   #20276
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QuoteOriginally posted by FantasticMrFox Quote
Blitz
The English didn't steal this one: Hitler dropped it on them.






Mods - please don't take this as a political statement: I am just referring to history, which I know the current population of Germany would like to forget, and wish never happened.
10-18-2015, 11:41 PM   #20277
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QuoteOriginally posted by rod_grant Quote
And then Mark, there all the saffer and kiwi variations - which might be spelt the same as London English but are unrecognisable in pronunciation.
Too right, mate!
10-19-2015, 10:22 AM   #20278
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QuoteOriginally posted by savoche Quote
The word is "rundkjøring". Try saying that, umm, once?
I can say it just fine, though it helps knowing what is means.


Steve
10-19-2015, 10:24 AM   #20279
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QuoteOriginally posted by FantasticMrFox Quote
Off the top of my head, here's what English stole from German:
Stole nothing...those words (and a ton of others) are an honest inheritance courtesy of a common ancestor.


Steve
10-19-2015, 10:27 AM - 2 Likes   #20280
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QuoteOriginally posted by normhead Quote
They are trying to recreated that narrow DoF one eye in focus effect.
Like this?




Steve
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