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02-20-2016, 08:21 PM   #23836
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QuoteOriginally posted by Rupert Quote
Hell, you are no more handsome than I am
True, but I stand closer to my razor.
And today is Saturday, my bath day so I may even shave again.

02-20-2016, 08:23 PM   #23837
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QuoteOriginally posted by Parallax Quote
I hope you have something good in that Glencairn glass.
As I have discovered It is very good for cognac, With the Courvoisier V.S.O.P there is a rich oak scent with a hint of spice to it.

QuoteOriginally posted by Parallax Quote
The purpose of the Glencairn glass is to concentrate the aroma and therby accentuate or intensify the flavor.
My god it works, the standard short tumblers I usually drink from don't do much for the scent or taste of the drink. Compared to my standard tumblers the Talisker 10 year old, in the Glencairn glass I was surprised by the contrast.
02-20-2016, 08:48 PM   #23838
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Yep, they really do make a difference.
My favorite single malt is Ardbeg.

Last edited by Parallax; 02-20-2016 at 09:00 PM.
02-20-2016, 09:00 PM   #23839
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QuoteOriginally posted by Parallax Quote
My favorite is Ardbeg.
I have some bottles Ardberg - i'll have to try it...didn't Glenmorangie take over the ardberg distillery?

02-20-2016, 09:05 PM   #23840
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QuoteOriginally posted by Digitalis Quote
I have some bottles Ardberg - i'll have to try it...didn't Glenmorangie take over the ardberg distillery?
I don't know. I hadn't heard that.
The way I describe Ardbeg 10 is this:
The flavor is much like Lagavulin and Laphroaig, but if they were sandpaper Lagavulin would be 320 grit and Ardbeg would 80 grit.
02-20-2016, 09:09 PM   #23841
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QuoteOriginally posted by Parallax Quote
if they were sandpaper Lagavulin would be 320 grit and Ardbeg would 80 grit.
hmm in that case I think I'd enjoy the more polished lagavulin.
02-20-2016, 10:02 PM   #23842
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QuoteOriginally posted by Digitalis Quote
Aren't they supposed to use gas regulators that won't spark?
Certainly, but the rest of the cylinder body is steel and is going to strike sparks as it rubs along the pavement. Or the steel truck parts will. Or the electrical systems of the two damaged vehicles. There were plenty of ignition sources for a nice fuel-air mixture.
02-21-2016, 12:35 AM   #23843
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QuoteOriginally posted by Parallax Quote
I don't know. I hadn't heard that.
The way I describe Ardbeg 10 is this:
The flavor is much like Lagavulin and Laphroaig, but if they were sandpaper Lagavulin would be 320 grit and Ardbeg would 80 grit.
That is both the funniest and the best way i've ever heard anyone explain scotch.

02-21-2016, 12:39 AM   #23844
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I got real brave yesterday. For the first time in my life I tried a blue stilton cheese.

When I was little my mother did things like give me blue vein cheese sandwiches to take to school that really put me off the blue mould cheeses. Took so long to get brave enough to try, given all the comments I had heard about the power of the flavour of stilton. I also found a very hard, crumbly red cheese, the name of which I do not recall. I will need to go back to that market stall next week. It was a pasteurised cow milk cheese.

When I was young most children in Australia took their own lunch to school. Those who did not bought from an a la carte menu at the tuck shop. The items on the menu were not of the grandness usually associated a la carte, stuff like pies and pasties. I never could understand schools in some other countries (not third world poor countries where lunches were provided at school as part of a welfare scheme) where schools got involved in something a private as what food the kids eat, and then feed them with stuff which is probably prepared strictly to a budget and also convenient to dish up in large quantities in a few minutes. Seems strange parents yielding their right to feed their children lunches that suit the parents' view about what constitutes suitable food.

---------- Post added 02-21-16 at 06:11 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by ZoeB Quote
That is both the funniest and the best way i've ever heard anyone explain scotch.
My experience of scotch is that I would not use any sandpaper analogy. I find it refinedly smooth on the throat. Brandy would fit the sandpaper analogy, and all the ones I have had, up to and including XOs, would fit in the 20, 40, 60 grit ranges.
02-21-2016, 12:49 AM   #23845
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QuoteOriginally posted by tim60 Quote
When I was young most children in Australia took their own lunch to school.
I'm part of that generation, nearly all the food from the "A la carte" was sourced from a nearby bakery (In the Barossa there are a lot to choose from) but it was usually unhealthy food. My mother grew a lot of fruit and veg herself, so I always had fresh tomatoes, multiple varieties of apples, mandarins, oranges, pears, nectarines, peaches and grapes. The rubbish you buy from stores is bland and in poor shape from transit, fresh is the way to go.

Some of my friends from primary school became really fat, mostly due to their laziness and that of their parents. While I stayed thin, bordering on underweight ( I liked to run a lot then, I still go for a jog on the beach). And I still enjoy fruit.. while most people would leave it. I have some pineapple in the fridge - for some reason i'm the only person in my family that can eat it, everyone else gets the lining of their mouths stripped.

Last edited by Digitalis; 02-21-2016 at 01:13 AM.
02-21-2016, 01:07 AM   #23846
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QuoteOriginally posted by Digitalis Quote
I'm part of that generation, nearly all the food from the "A la carte" was sourced from a nearby bakery (In the Barossa there are a lot to choose from) but it was usually unhealthy food. My mother grew a lot of fruit and veg herself, so I always had fresh tomatoes, multiple varieties of apples, mandarins, oranges and grapes. The rubbish you buy from stores is bland and in poor shape from transit, fresh is the way to go.

Some of my friends from primary school became really fat, mostly due to their laziness and that of their parents. While I stayed thin, bordering on underweight ( I liked to run a lot then, I still go for a jog on the beach). And I still enjoy fruit.. while most people would leave it. I have some pineapple in the fridge - for some reason i'm the only person in my family that can eat it, everyone else gets the lining of their mouths stripped.
Interesting. My experience too. As I get older I need to be more careful how much I eat, but the things I like tend to be better, not excessively high salt or fat or sugar. I seem to be able to keep myself about the upper end of 'normal' which follows my mother's family, not my father's family. I like fruit too, which is more of a challenge now I moved, although in the right season figs are wonderfully cheap, from Turkey. In Australia they are several time the price as in England, even though the Adelaide climate suits them very well. I do miss my little orchard in the back yard, over 20 trees. Fruit now reduces to apples. I have discovered two English varieties that are good, both look dumpy but taste good. Russet and Cox.

Barossa bakeries, something to miss. I spent a year in the Riverland and when I went out to visit sites all over the northern mallee and riverland I would call at the bakeries for lunch. I found places I liked in Morgan, Waikerie, Barmera (where I lived), Loxton, Renmark and Berri. The road south of Loxton through Alawoona and Wanbi was a bit bleak though. Now those bakeries have declined or gone. I think many of the bakeries were spillovers from the Barossa.
02-21-2016, 01:14 AM   #23847
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QuoteOriginally posted by tim60 Quote
I have discovered two English varieties that are good, both look dumpy but taste good.
Nothing beats golden delicious straight off the tree.
02-21-2016, 02:07 AM   #23848
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QuoteOriginally posted by Digitalis Quote
Nothing beats golden delicious straight off the tree.


My favorite.
02-21-2016, 02:15 AM   #23849
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QuoteOriginally posted by MarkJerling Quote
Lovely, Rob. But I think you missed the point on the health front with grilling rather than frying. It's bacon and a Twinkie!


Nature's perfect food.
02-21-2016, 02:20 AM   #23850
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QuoteOriginally posted by Digitalis Quote
Aren't they supposed to use gas regulators that won't spark?


Compressed gas cylinders should never be transported with a regulator attached. Only the safety cap.
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