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09-23-2016, 01:29 AM   #29281
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QuoteOriginally posted by savoche Quote
That was my thought, too, but then again, it's just a 10A/230V contraption. And from 1990.
I would have thought that would be 20A at least. Have you, at any time, replaced the element?

09-23-2016, 01:45 AM   #29282
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QuoteOriginally posted by Racer X 69 Quote
At most homes the power is delivered at 220v single phase from the transformer. The main panel will have a 200 amp capacity with two 110v buses. For 220 circuits the two are combined.


Larger homes with higher load demands will have a 400 amp service, but the panel configuration is the same.


Businesses with high draw machinery will have a 440v 3 phase service. Essentially 3 110v circuits.


Really large businesses, like the factory I work in, have their own substation. The power going into the sub is 115,000v. What goes out, into the factory electrical system is similar to the substations that deliver power elsewhere, usually 17,500v. Then various transformers step the voltage down as needed for lightning and machinery.
Ha. That clears it up. Our main lines carry 220kV and serves substations from where supplies run out at 110 kV, 66 kV and 50 kV. From that step down to 230V per phase.
09-23-2016, 08:08 AM   #29283
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QuoteOriginally posted by savoche Quote

That was my thought, too, but then again, it's just a 10A/230V contraption. And from 1990.

Hopefully the new one will hold on to its smoke somewhat better

The plumbers were on time, polite, and well prepared. I'm trying to figure out what's wrong.


Plumbers?


Looks more like you need an electrician.
09-23-2016, 08:42 AM   #29284
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QuoteOriginally posted by MarkJerling Quote
Ha. That clears it up. Our main lines carry 220kV and serves substations from where supplies run out at 110 kV, 66 kV and 50 kV. From that step down to 230V per phase.


The main power distribution systems pass energy from the generation source to various parts of the country on high voltage transmission lines, typically 500kV and 230kV, such as the Bonneville Power Administration.


From the larger substations regional power companies (both public such an PUD's and private such as Puget Sound Energy) tap off with 115kV transmission lines for their regional distribution systems. Those transmission lines make up the backbone of each utilities distribution system. From strategically located substations the energy is stepped down to 17.5kV, and then lowered even more at each customer delivery point as required.


Working inside of power substations is interesting, but very dangerous.








Here is a video of a switch being opened at a sub with 500kV lines under load.






I've been in substations when switching is taking place. It is spooky. Also very dangerous, as the energy is looking for ground.


You don't want to be in the ground path.

09-23-2016, 09:17 AM - 2 Likes   #29285
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QuoteOriginally posted by Racer X 69 Quote
energy is looking for ground.
One of the nurses I used to work for said "old people are like electricity; they always go to ground."
09-23-2016, 09:40 AM   #29286
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QuoteOriginally posted by Parallax Quote
One of the nurses I used to work for said "old people are like electricity; they always go to ground."
That's funny.
09-23-2016, 11:30 AM   #29287
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QuoteOriginally posted by MarkJerling Quote
I would have thought that would be 20A at least. Have you, at any time, replaced the element?
The stove is on a 20A and the rest are 10A as our electrical system is fairly ancient. When the time comes to refit everything the normal would be 16A for standard circuits and 25A (or 32A?) for technical circuits. We're also on a single phase, new installations are all 3 phases.

QuoteOriginally posted by Racer X 69 Quote
Plumbers?

Looks more like you need an electrician.
Ah, no, there was no attempt at repairing the circuitry. They replaced the entire heater. 26 years was old enough, I think. Besides, at the hourly rates charged these days that was probably the cheapest solution anyway.

I'm just glad we didn't need the fire department...
09-23-2016, 01:54 PM   #29288
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QuoteOriginally posted by MarkJerling Quote
Welcome back Bert! Well lets see... In the week that was:

Someone tried to make it a photography thread (Odd, I know!) then we ventured into tractors and lawns and lawnmowing before venturing to four wheel driving until Rob guided us back to food and before Savoche tried to burn his house down. I think that about sums it up. (Other than the topic you mentioned and which I won't comment about.)
Oh, I forgot.. But I didn't try to burn down my house. Or at least, I didn't try. If anybody did it was the previous owner. I've found a few "creative" solutions that he's left behind. I don't really like creativity when it comes to electric wiring. For some things in life following the book is the right thing to do.

09-23-2016, 01:57 PM - 2 Likes   #29289
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Of course, photography isn't one of those things. But then that's not relevant for this thread, is it.
09-23-2016, 02:12 PM   #29290
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QuoteOriginally posted by savoche Quote
For some things in life following the book is the right thing to do.


Without a doubt.
09-23-2016, 11:29 PM   #29291
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QuoteOriginally posted by savoche Quote
Oh, I forgot.. But I didn't try to burn down my house. Or at least, I didn't try. If anybody did it was the previous owner. I've found a few "creative" solutions that he's left behind. I don't really like creativity when it comes to electric wiring. For some things in life following the book is the right thing to do.
Looks to me like the previous owner may have rewired the mains cable going in and got too much tension on the wires with the result that the insulation perished. Could also have stripped the insulation by nipping in with side cutters and pulling - stretching the plastic and damaging its integrity, forming the beginning of the perishing. Also, event though it appears to have been a plug-in appliance, because it is fixed to the wall, where I come from that is an electrician job. The rules there were that plug in appliances themselves and free cables were do it yourself but fixed wiring was electrician. So, an extension cord hung of cup hooks is 'not permanent' (do it yourself) but the same extension cord fixed with cable clips becomes 'permanent' and requires an electrician. Gets interesting with tricks like wiring a garden shed using an outdoor extension cable!
09-24-2016, 02:50 AM   #29292
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QuoteOriginally posted by tim60 Quote
Looks to me like the previous owner may have rewired the mains cable going in and got too much tension on the wires with the result that the insulation perished. Could also have stripped the insulation by nipping in with side cutters and pulling - stretching the plastic and damaging its integrity, forming the beginning of the perishing. Also, event though it appears to have been a plug-in appliance, because it is fixed to the wall, where I come from that is an electrician job. The rules there were that plug in appliances themselves and free cables were do it yourself but fixed wiring was electrician. So, an extension cord hung of cup hooks is 'not permanent' (do it yourself) but the same extension cord fixed with cable clips becomes 'permanent' and requires an electrician. Gets interesting with tricks like wiring a garden shed using an outdoor extension cable!
I think we have much the same regulations here, but as far as I know it doesn't matter whether the appliance is fixed or not - what matters is if it's plug-in or permanently wired. And if it is fixed to a wall you're not allowed to use an extension cord. I never understood why an appliance not fixed to the wall implicitly is less permanent than one that is... But then again, it can't be easy to make regulations that make sense in all situations, either.
09-24-2016, 02:53 AM   #29293
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09-24-2016, 03:25 AM   #29294
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QuoteOriginally posted by savoche Quote
Oh, I forgot.. But I didn't try to burn down my house. Or at least, I didn't try.
For a moment there you had me worried that this is a factually correct thread!
09-24-2016, 03:26 AM   #29295
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QuoteOriginally posted by savoche Quote
I think we have much the same regulations here, but as far as I know it doesn't matter whether the appliance is fixed or not - what matters is if it's plug-in or permanently wired. And if it is fixed to a wall you're not allowed to use an extension cord. I never understood why an appliance not fixed to the wall implicitly is less permanent than one that is... But then again, it can't be easy to make regulations that make sense in all situations, either.
Don't move to the state of Victoria (Australia) where it's actually illegal to replace your own lightbulbs! Probably the nation's most broken law.
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