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01-16-2014, 03:32 PM   #3421
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QuoteOriginally posted by dansamy Quote
What is that, Jean?
it's a Nikno f-50 with cheese on it

01-16-2014, 03:33 PM   #3422
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Because we have them or because of what Exes do? Or did? I have an ex. Lovely woman. Have not seen her for about thirty years. Still would like to see her. Go figure.

Maybe I cannot buy a K3 until my first true love calls me.

Her phone number is: oh, never mind.
01-16-2014, 03:36 PM   #3423
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
Given the Daleks unpredictable and irritable nature I would bet on a high velocity Cheez Whiz weapon!!! Yellow Death! Exterminate!!!


Steve
I was thinking more like cheese in a can,, spewing out of the weapon
01-16-2014, 03:53 PM   #3424
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QuoteOriginally posted by waterfall Quote
Her phone number is: oh, never mind.
You mean oh-800-never-mind? Cool number!

01-16-2014, 05:00 PM - 1 Like   #3425
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QuoteOriginally posted by OldNoob Quote
I was thinking more like cheese in a can,, spewing out of the weapon
I don't think it would be that bad to be taken out by a giant can of cheese. On the days I deal with teenagers it actually sounds preferable!!!
01-16-2014, 05:04 PM - 1 Like   #3426
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How about the movie Dr Ricohlove! With Slim pickins riding a giant can of Easy Cheese out of the bomb bay yelling "YEE-HAA!!"
01-16-2014, 05:31 PM   #3427
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QuoteOriginally posted by Jean Poitiers Quote
OMG, I dropped the "FF" bomb
OMG, that's funny!!
01-16-2014, 05:35 PM   #3428
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QuoteOriginally posted by dansamy Quote
Pssstt...

That's a Dalek.
This is a nonsense thread. Stop posting accurate info.

01-16-2014, 05:37 PM - 1 Like   #3429
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
(The RICOH logo is on the back of course.)
Tramp stamp?
01-16-2014, 06:02 PM   #3430
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QuoteOriginally posted by DeadJohn Quote
Tramp stamp?
No fear, got some 4" wide gaffers tape on order from B&H. It will take care of lot of things. Might even save the galaxy
01-16-2014, 06:26 PM   #3431
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Duck tape is The Force. It has a light side, a dark side & it binds the universe together.

Last edited by dansamy; 01-16-2014 at 07:53 PM.
01-16-2014, 06:55 PM   #3432
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Ummmm, that is actually "duck tape". http://en.m.wikipedia.org?wiki/Duct_tape.

"During World War II, Revolite, then a division of Johnson & Johnson, developed an adhesive tape made from a rubber-based adhesive applied to a durable duck cloth backing. This tape resisted water and was used as sealing tape on ammunition cases during World War II.[1]

History and etymologyEdit
The first material called "duck tape" was long strips of plain cotton duck cloth used in making shoes stronger, for decoration on clothing, and for wrapping steel cables or electrical conductors to protect them from corrosion or wear.[2] For instance, in 1902, steel cables supporting the Brooklyn Bridge were first covered in linseed oil then wrapped in duck tape before being laid in place.[3] In the 1910s, certain boots and shoes used canvas duck fabric for the upper or for the insole, and duck tape was sometimes sewn in for reinforcement.[4] In 1936, the US-based Insulated Power Cables Engineers Association specified a wrapping of duck tape as one of many methods used to protect rubber-insulated power cables.[5] In 1942, Gimbel's department store offered venetian blinds that were held together with vertical strips of duck tape.[6] All of these forgoing uses were for plain cottton or linen tape that came without a layer of applied adhesive.

Adhesive tapes of various sorts were in use by the 1910s, including rolls of cloth tape with adhesive coating one side. White adhesive tape made of cloth soaked in rubber and zinc oxide was used in hospitals to bind wounds, but other tapes such as friction tape or electrical tape could be substituted in an emergency.[7] In 1930, the magazine Popular Mechanics described how to make adhesive tape at home using plain cloth tape soaked in a heated liquid mixture of rosin and rubber from inner tubes.[8]

In 1923, Richard Gurley Drew working for 3M invented masking tape, a paper-based tape with a mildly sticky adhesive. In 1925 this became the Scotch brand masking tape. In 1930, Drew developed a transparent tape based on cellophane, called Scotch Tape. This tape was widely used beginning in the Great Depression to repair household items.[9] Author Scott Berkun has written that duct tape is "arguably" a modification of this early success by 3M.[10] However, neither of Drew's inventions were based on cloth tape.[9]

The Revolite division of Johnson & Johnson made medical adhesive tapes from duck cloth, beginning in 1927. During World War II, a team headed by Revolite's Johnny Denoye and Johnson & Johnson's Bill Gross developed a new adhesive tape for the US military, intended to seal ammunition cases against moisture.[11] The tape was required to be ripped by hand, not cut with scissors. According to Johnson & Johnson, the idea came from an ordnance-factory worker--and mother of two Navy sailors--named Vesta Stoudt, who worried that problems with ammunition-box seals would cost soldiers precious time in battle. She wrote to President Franklin D Roosevelt in 1943 with the idea to seal the boxes with a fabric tape, which she had tested at her factory. The letter was forwarded to the War Production Board, who put Johnson & Johnson on the job.[12] Their new, unnamed product was made of thin cotton duck tape coated in waterproof polyethylene (plastic) with a layer of rubber-based gray adhesive ("Polycoat") bonded to one side.[6][13][14][15][16][17] It was easy to apply and remove, and was soon adapted to repair military equipment quickly, including vehicles and weapons.[13] This tape, colored in army-standard matte olive drab, was nicknamed "duck tape" by the soldiers.[18] Various theories have been put forward for the nickname, including the descendant relation to cotton duck fabric, the waterproof characteristics of a duck bird, and even the 1942 amphibious military vehicle DUKW which was pronounced "duck".[19]"
01-16-2014, 06:58 PM   #3433
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ex Finn. Quote
No fear, got some 4" wide gaffers tape on order from B&H. It will take care of lot of things. Might even save the galaxy
Actually, I have a theory about that - astronomers are saying that 84.5% of the matter in the universe is un-observable "dark matter" - I think it's just regular matter that someone covered up with black tape because they didn't like the logo.
01-16-2014, 07:01 PM   #3434
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QuoteOriginally posted by THoog Quote
Actually, I have a theory about that - astronomers are saying that 84.5% of the matter in the universe is un-observable "dark matter" - I think it's just regular matter that someone covered up with black tape because they didn't like the logo.



Steve
01-16-2014, 07:08 PM   #3435
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QuoteOriginally posted by Parallax Quote
Ummmm, that is actually "duck tape". http://en.m.wikipedia.org?wiki/Duct_tape.

"During World War II, Revolite, then a division of Johnson & Johnson, developed an adhesive tape made from a rubber-based adhesive applied to a durable duck cloth backing. This tape resisted water and was used as sealing tape on ammunition cases during World War II.[1]

History and etymologyEdit
The first material called "duck tape" was long strips of plain cotton duck cloth used in making shoes stronger, for decoration on clothing, and for wrapping steel cables or electrical conductors to protect them from corrosion or wear.[2] For instance, in 1902, steel cables supporting the Brooklyn Bridge were first covered in linseed oil then wrapped in duck tape before being laid in place.[3] In the 1910s, certain boots and shoes used canvas duck fabric for the upper or for the insole, and duck tape was sometimes sewn in for reinforcement.[4] In 1936, the US-based Insulated Power Cables Engineers Association specified a wrapping of duck tape as one of many methods used to protect rubber-insulated power cables.[5] In 1942, Gimbel's department store offered venetian blinds that were held together with vertical strips of duck tape.[6] All of these forgoing uses were for plain cottton or linen tape that came without a layer of applied adhesive.

Adhesive tapes of various sorts were in use by the 1910s, including rolls of cloth tape with adhesive coating one side. White adhesive tape made of cloth soaked in rubber and zinc oxide was used in hospitals to bind wounds, but other tapes such as friction tape or electrical tape could be substituted in an emergency.[7] In 1930, the magazine Popular Mechanics described how to make adhesive tape at home using plain cloth tape soaked in a heated liquid mixture of rosin and rubber from inner tubes.[8]

In 1923, Richard Gurley Drew working for 3M invented masking tape, a paper-based tape with a mildly sticky adhesive. In 1925 this became the Scotch brand masking tape. In 1930, Drew developed a transparent tape based on cellophane, called Scotch Tape. This tape was widely used beginning in the Great Depression to repair household items.[9] Author Scott Berkun has written that duct tape is "arguably" a modification of this early success by 3M.[10] However, neither of Drew's inventions were based on cloth tape.[9]

The Revolite division of Johnson & Johnson made medical adhesive tapes from duck cloth, beginning in 1927. During World War II, a team headed by Revolite's Johnny Denoye and Johnson & Johnson's Bill Gross developed a new adhesive tape for the US military, intended to seal ammunition cases against moisture.[11] The tape was required to be ripped by hand, not cut with scissors. According to Johnson & Johnson, the idea came from an ordnance-factory worker--and mother of two Navy sailors--named Vesta Stoudt, who worried that problems with ammunition-box seals would cost soldiers precious time in battle. She wrote to President Franklin D Roosevelt in 1943 with the idea to seal the boxes with a fabric tape, which she had tested at her factory. The letter was forwarded to the War Production Board, who put Johnson & Johnson on the job.[12] Their new, unnamed product was made of thin cotton duck tape coated in waterproof polyethylene (plastic) with a layer of rubber-based gray adhesive ("Polycoat") bonded to one side.[6][13][14][15][16][17] It was easy to apply and remove, and was soon adapted to repair military equipment quickly, including vehicles and weapons.[13] This tape, colored in army-standard matte olive drab, was nicknamed "duck tape" by the soldiers.[18] Various theories have been put forward for the nickname, including the descendant relation to cotton duck fabric, the waterproof characteristics of a duck bird, and even the 1942 amphibious military vehicle DUKW which was pronounced "duck".[19]"
That is so long it made me go to sleeeeep. Please refrain from posting factual nonsense in the future.
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