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07-14-2019, 11:24 AM - 1 Like   #68971
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QuoteOriginally posted by robtcorl Quote
Is Mrs P originally from the show me state?
No. Othet than one of her brothers (the one I actually like) and her Aunt living there we have no connection to MO.

07-14-2019, 11:30 AM - 3 Likes   #68972
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QuoteOriginally posted by robtcorl Quote
There was a reason I included a brand name rather than just saying "my 3lb salami"
Apparently the effort was in vain.
07-14-2019, 12:07 PM - 3 Likes   #68973
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QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
We tend not to have the "back porch" concept here in Blighty But I do have areas in the garden that are either sheltered from sun and the elements, completely open to them, or a gentle mix of both... I quite fancy having a go at some chillies. Hmmm.... another mini-project
In this image you can see the pots we grew the chilies in. Actually, we grew tomatoes in a couple, chilies in one, and habaneros in another.



In this next shot you can see the orchard, and one of two raised beds (the blue thing) that are our vegetable garden, to the left, behind the kid's travel trailer.

07-14-2019, 12:24 PM - 4 Likes   #68974
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Tomorrow we'll finally get the keys (or rather the code to the electronic lock) to our new-to-us flat. Feels like this process has lasted forever and a half - and we still haven't even moved. Anyway, this is the last week at the old place (even though we're not here more than we have to this time of year). There's still a lot of work getting settled in at the new place, but that's at least a bit fun. Packing and throwing stuff away is just tedious. But hey, now I get space to "collect" stuff all over again

Then I'll sleep for a week.

07-14-2019, 02:36 PM - 3 Likes   #68975
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QuoteOriginally posted by savoche Quote
Tomorrow we'll finally get the keys (or rather the code to the electronic lock) to our new-to-us flat.
Please post some pics of your new digs when you get settled in.
PS: no k3 pics though PLEASE!
07-14-2019, 03:25 PM - 4 Likes   #68976
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QuoteOriginally posted by tim60 Quote
It even surprised me when I came here that there is an almost total lack of verandas here. Not ones over the front door big enough to shelter you and you stuff while getting keys out to unlock the door. Nor in town outside the shops so you can walk along the street without getting wet. Verandas of both types are very common in Australia.
I think it's mostly an issue with land availability and associated plot sizes. I'm sure you've noticed the dreadful plot sizes for modern homes here. Anyone wanting a decent plot by UK standards really needs to be looking at something built in the '70s or earlier, or buying a plot of land for a custom build (but either way, if the plot is large, you pay big for it). But even then, by (for example) US - and, I'd guess - Aussie standards, where land outside the cities would appear to be plentiful and, in many cases, relatively inexpensive, our bigger plots are still rather small. Back in 2012 / 2013 when my ex and I divorced, our home in Surrey was worth around GBP 850k (around USD $1.1M), and the plot was tiny compared to the land that Racer's beautiful home is built on (you couldn't even get a plot like that over here, unless you bought a farm or manor - or one of very few multi-million-pound private homes). We could park three or four cars on the drive, and the back garden was maybe 50' in length. And our plot was generous, since it was a mid-70s build home.

The thing is, we're a small island nation with a high and growing population, so the plot sizes / small gardens / lack of exterior luxuries makes sense. Fun fact: there are 11 US states that are larger than our entire Kingdom, and many more that are very close in size, all with populations a fraction of the size. In the USA, there is more than eight times the land per head of population than there is here (I suspect it's even greater in Australia?). You can see why our plots are so small (and getting smaller), even for modern, high-end executive homes. There are more apartments being built. It's increasingly difficult to get planning permission for single-story dwellings (we call them bungalows) except for retirement homes (and difficult enough for those). Plus, we generally don't have a great deal of weather annually where you'd want to sit outside for very long, so the utility of a veranda / porch is more limited than in warmer and drier countries. As such, whilst it would be possible (and nice) to have them on UK homes, when weighed up against the prospect of slightly larger footprint for the main walls of the home and the resulting space inside, it's a no-brainer. Goodbye porch / veranda Some folks choose to sacrifice some of their back gardens to install decking, but given the size of those gardens, it usually leaves very little lawn and shrubbery to enjoy

People in other countries look at UK homes and plot sizes and consider them small and humble... and, in a sense, they are - certainly when compared to larger, less densely populated countries. But the value and cost of them takes into account the country's small and shrinking available land mass for properties (excluding protected areas), and the growing population. As an example, I'd guess Racer's property would, depending on area, sell for maybe three or four times the price over here... Possibly more, depending on the total size of the plot.

I have a tiny - and I do mean tiny - enclosed brick-built porch at the front of my home. It has lockable doors which I mostly leave unlocked during the day, whether I'm at home or out, so parcels can be left inside... and it's just big enough to store boots and umbrellas, and shelter me from rain whilst unlocking the main front door to enter the property. Locally, that's a luxury...

EDIT: I found the attached and interesting graphic while searching online... This is a map of UK regions, with each tiny region compared to a US state in terms of absolute population... When you think of the size of those states, it's a very sobering thought. Anyone with an extreme sense of claustrophobia probably wouldn't want to think about it

For most of my adult life I lived in the areas compared to New Jersey and Virgina (apparently, Central London has a population comparable to the entire state of Virginia )... Now I'm back in the region compared to Nevada
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Last edited by BigMackCam; 07-14-2019 at 06:05 PM.
07-14-2019, 04:40 PM - 3 Likes   #68977
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QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
I think it's mostly an issue with land availability and associated plot sizes. I'm sure you've noticed the dreadful plot sizes for modern homes here. Anyone wanting a decent plot by UK standards really needs to be looking at something built in the '70s or earlier, or buying a plot of land for a custom build (but either way, if the plot is large, you pay big for it). But even then, by (for example) US - and, I'd guess - Aussie standards, where land outside the cities would appear to be plentiful and, in many cases, relatively inexpensive, our bigger plots are still rather small. Back in 2012 / 2013 when my ex and I divorced, our home in Surrey was worth around GBP 850k (around USD $1.1), and the plot was tiny compared to the land that Racer's beautiful home is built on (you couldn't even get a plot like that over here, unless you bought a farm or manor - or one of very few multi-million-pound private homes). We could park three or four cars on the drive, and the back garden was maybe 50' in length. And our plot was generous, since it was a mid-70s build home.

The thing is, we're a small island nation with a high and growing population, so the plot sizes / small gardens / lack of exterior luxuries makes sense. Fun fact: there are 11 US states that are larger than our entire Kingdom, and many more that are very close in size, all with populations a fraction of the size. In the USA, there is more than eight times the land per head of population than there is here (I suspect it's even greater in Australia?). You can see why our plots are so small (and getting smaller), even for modern, high-end executive homes. There are more apartments being built. It's increasingly difficult to get planning permission for single-story dwellings (we call them bungalows) except for retirement homes (and difficult enough for those). Plus, we generally don't have a great deal of weather annually where you'd want to sit outside for very long, so the utility of a veranda / porch is more limited than in warmer and drier countries. As such, whilst it would be possible (and nice) to have them on UK homes, when weighed up against the prospect of slightly larger footprint for the main walls of the home and the resulting space inside, it's a no-brainer. Goodbye porch / veranda Some folks choose to sacrifice some of their back gardens to install decking, but given the size of those gardens, it usually leaves very little lawn and shrubbery to enjoy

People in other countries look at UK homes and plot sizes and consider them small and humble... and, in a sense, they are - certainly when compared to larger, less densely populated countries. But the value and cost of them takes into account the country's small and shrinking available land mass for properties (excluding protected areas), and the growing population. As an example, I'd guess Racer's property would, depending on area, sell for maybe three or four times the price over here... Possibly more, depending on the total size of the plot.
I feel like such an aristocrat after reading this.
07-14-2019, 04:40 PM - 5 Likes   #68978
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Size wise, I had to get Missouri and other mid-western states involved.



07-14-2019, 04:45 PM - 4 Likes   #68979
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Good Morning All

Well....

Went to The Bend race track on Saturday......I want to go again......friends had a room overlooking pit straight and the course.
Mike looking at that map..well...8 x of England fits in Victoria and thats the smallest mainland state in Aus
Is there any truth in the rumour that the abundence of Chilli growing is making the earth sneeze ( earth quakes )..
On a serious note I hope all who have beeen affected are safe
BACON

Dave
07-15-2019, 04:37 AM   #68980
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QuoteOriginally posted by dbs Quote
Is there any truth in the rumour that the abundence of Chilli growing is making the earth sneeze ( earth quakes )..
Not sure Dave.

I do know that red hot chili peppers burn twice.

First while eating them.

Second during the ring of fire moment the next day when they make their exit.

So go easy with them. A little is good, a lot can be, um, quite unpleasant.

Twice.
07-15-2019, 04:55 AM - 1 Like   #68981
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QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
I think it's mostly an issue with land availability and associated plot sizes. I'm sure you've noticed the dreadful plot sizes for modern homes here. Anyone wanting a decent plot by UK standards really needs to be looking at something built in the '70s or earlier, or buying a plot of land for a custom build (but either way, if the plot is large, you pay big for it). But even then, by (for example) US - and, I'd guess - Aussie standards, where land outside the cities would appear to be plentiful and, in many cases, relatively inexpensive, our bigger plots are still rather small. Back in 2012 / 2013 when my ex and I divorced, our home in Surrey was worth around GBP 850k (around USD $1.1M), and the plot was tiny compared to the land that Racer's beautiful home is built on (you couldn't even get a plot like that over here, unless you bought a farm or manor - or one of very few multi-million-pound private homes). We could park three or four cars on the drive, and the back garden was maybe 50' in length. And our plot was generous, since it was a mid-70s build home.

The thing is, we're a small island nation with a high and growing population, so the plot sizes / small gardens / lack of exterior luxuries makes sense. Fun fact: there are 11 US states that are larger than our entire Kingdom, and many more that are very close in size, all with populations a fraction of the size. In the USA, there is more than eight times the land per head of population than there is here (I suspect it's even greater in Australia?). You can see why our plots are so small (and getting smaller), even for modern, high-end executive homes. There are more apartments being built. It's increasingly difficult to get planning permission for single-story dwellings (we call them bungalows) except for retirement homes (and difficult enough for those). Plus, we generally don't have a great deal of weather annually where you'd want to sit outside for very long, so the utility of a veranda / porch is more limited than in warmer and drier countries. As such, whilst it would be possible (and nice) to have them on UK homes, when weighed up against the prospect of slightly larger footprint for the main walls of the home and the resulting space inside, it's a no-brainer. Goodbye porch / veranda Some folks choose to sacrifice some of their back gardens to install decking, but given the size of those gardens, it usually leaves very little lawn and shrubbery to enjoy

People in other countries look at UK homes and plot sizes and consider them small and humble... and, in a sense, they are - certainly when compared to larger, less densely populated countries. But the value and cost of them takes into account the country's small and shrinking available land mass for properties (excluding protected areas), and the growing population. As an example, I'd guess Racer's property would, depending on area, sell for maybe three or four times the price over here... Possibly more, depending on the total size of the plot.

I have a tiny - and I do mean tiny - enclosed brick-built porch at the front of my home. It has lockable doors which I mostly leave unlocked during the day, whether I'm at home or out, so parcels can be left inside... and it's just big enough to store boots and umbrellas, and shelter me from rain whilst unlocking the main front door to enter the property. Locally, that's a luxury...

EDIT: I found the attached and interesting graphic while searching online... This is a map of UK regions, with each tiny region compared to a US state in terms of absolute population... When you think of the size of those states, it's a very sobering thought. Anyone with an extreme sense of claustrophobia probably wouldn't want to think about it

For most of my adult life I lived in the areas compared to New Jersey and Virgina (apparently, Central London has a population comparable to the entire state of Virginia )... Now I'm back in the region compared to Nevada


When I was thinking porch at the front door, I was thinking of adding a piece of sheltering roof about 6 foot by 3 foot above the pathway which is already at the front of the property.


The verandas were for the high street shops, to extend from the front wall over the pavement so the shoppers can walk along the pavement without being in the wet.


As for other house design things, I am seeing a lot of stuff as I look for a house to buy, and also noticing other differences.


The houses are smaller here, not unreasonably given a number of aspects of the circumstances. But a lot of the floorplans are very inefficient use of the space that is available. For example, dividing the 'reception' rooms in the house into separate rooms with full walls, doors and a passageway linking them seems as though the mentality is to produce a mini-manor, rather than to provide the greatest possible useful space as could be achieved through open plan living and dining rooms. Also, I do not recall seeing more than one or two dryer, stacked on top of washer configurations, instead filling more floor space by putting both on the floor. Also, other strange ideas such as one where the water tank was in a cupboard in the main bedroom that filled so much space that the bedroom was seriously compromised, when there was another cupboard on the landing, immediately adjacent, through the wall, where it could have been put. And on it goes.


Just pulled out of buying a property. We offered based on the cost estimate of the vendor's building report. Got my own. The costs from mine were double those of the vendors, and also the advice that the nature of the damage would make the place un-mortgageable and un-insurable, and even AFTER repairs there would be continuous insurance problems requiring repeated recertification of OK. In Australia those problems would not be so difficult. Probably the mortgage may require remedial works be done immediately on purchase, and once repaired by properly licenced contractors, for the class of work done, there would no longer be an insurance problem, because the problem had been rectified. And those problems would continue to be a problem when you want to sell because the new buyer would be buying into the same history.


Remember building a house in Australia. The builder had to give a 25 year warranty on the footings, and 10 years on the construction work above the footings. That included things like the effectiveness of the insect control they used.
07-15-2019, 05:24 AM - 1 Like   #68982
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QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
Been a little while since I checked in to the thread ... I won't try to catch up, but I hope everyone is doing well, and my best wishes to all...

Important news: I tried adding a square of 70% dark chocolate to the chilli I made today, along with - at Racer's suggestion - twice the amount of fresh garlic (eight cloves instead of four). I was happy with my last batch, but this was better - much better, actually. Richer (from the chocolate) and more piquant (the garlic). I think I have my chilli recipe down, now And yet... I have a question for those in the know... Right now I'm using chilli powder for the heat. What about fresh chillies... Are they an improvement, or am I better off sticking with powder for this type of dish? Opinions and advice welcomed...

I use chili powder, cayenne powder...and a spash of vineger
07-15-2019, 05:28 AM - 2 Likes   #68983
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QuoteOriginally posted by Racer X 69 Quote
Raw honey should be available directly from a local beekeeper. You can use store bought pasteurized honey, but the pasteurization process ruins it, destroying all that is good about honey.

Of course you can also use brown sugar, or even white table sugar, but those highly processed complex carbohydrates aren't good for you.

You can grow the chilies in an 8 or 10 inch (200 to 250 mm) pot on your back porch. We grew ours in a 10" pot on the front stoop.
Personally, I am not a fan of any added sweetness (other than then sugar from the onions) in my chili (to each his own eh?). However, my spaghetti sauce gets diced up carrots to up the sweetness level.
07-15-2019, 05:33 AM - 2 Likes   #68984
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QuoteOriginally posted by Racer X 69 Quote
(Think I may have said this before)

Flying on commercial airlines has become much like cattle being herded onto trucks. Passengers are treated like freight, not people. The more that airlines can cram into an airplane the more revenue they earn.

And since 9/11 the added security has made the experience even less pleasurable.

So I have sworn that if I have the time I will drive to my destination.

And I really like the ride in airplanes.

Pity.
I do like the train.If I have business in Montreal or Toronto; the train it is!
07-15-2019, 05:36 AM - 2 Likes   #68985
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QuoteOriginally posted by savoche Quote
Tomorrow we'll finally get the keys (or rather the code to the electronic lock) to our new-to-us flat. Feels like this process has lasted forever and a half - and we still haven't even moved. Anyway, this is the last week at the old place (even though we're not here more than we have to this time of year). There's still a lot of work getting settled in at the new place, but that's at least a bit fun. Packing and throwing stuff away is just tedious. But hey, now I get space to "collect" stuff all over again

Then I'll sleep for a week.
I know how you feel...we will continue to maintain two places till Aug 22....very tiring indeed.
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