Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
02-19-2015, 03:45 AM   #14791
Pentaxian




Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Texas
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 3,429
QuoteOriginally posted by Parallax Quote
Momma Mamiya! You had to really Sekor-ound to find that one.
Better calm down, before you Polaroids flare up.

---------- Post added 02-19-15 at 04:46 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by FantasticMrFox Quote
These birds are the devil's pets! I got swooped twice when I lived in Australia, even their eyes are red! Who cares about all the venomous stuff that can potentially kill you if you actually die crashing into a lamp post with your bicycle because you had to fend off one of these flying rats?!

A guy in my neuroscience tutorial group at uni was partially blind because a magpie rammed its beak into his right eye when he was a kid
Wow! That's horrible! Poor guy.

---------- Post added 02-19-15 at 04:48 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by rod_grant Quote

PS. This is one of my first efforts with my new Siggy 150-500, handheld from my study window.
Nice shot! What focal length?

---------- Post added 02-19-15 at 04:49 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by tim60 Quote

Here spotlighting is hunting for rabbits or roos.
Same here, but for rabbits.

02-19-2015, 04:20 AM   #14792
Pentaxian




Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Wangaratta, Victoria
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 3,227
QuoteOriginally posted by r0ckstarr Quote
Nice shot! What focal length?
440mm - thanks for the like!
02-19-2015, 11:24 AM - 1 Like   #14793
Moderator
Racer X 69's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: The Great Pacific Northwet
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 9,897
QuoteOriginally posted by tim60 Quote
And the problem that makes for getting them out of the roof. Any method involving death of the possum is not permitted.
So are there "Possum Police"?

Last edited by Racer X 69; 02-19-2015 at 12:58 PM.
02-19-2015, 11:31 AM   #14794
Moderator
Racer X 69's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: The Great Pacific Northwet
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 9,897
QuoteOriginally posted by rod_grant Quote
Thanks Racer.
You're welcome Mr. G!

02-19-2015, 11:35 AM   #14795
Moderator
Racer X 69's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: The Great Pacific Northwet
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 9,897
QuoteOriginally posted by savoche Quote
Just hold'em by the tail and deep fry. Yummy.
Looks like dinner for a family of 12!
02-19-2015, 12:33 PM   #14796
Moderator
Racer X 69's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: The Great Pacific Northwet
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 9,897
QuoteOriginally posted by Joel B Quote
The one group we don't have in this area. Lots of Swedish but no Norwegian. Go figure.
And don't leave out the Germans in the Amana Colonies to your Northeast.
02-19-2015, 12:38 PM   #14797
Senior Moderator
Loyal Site Supporter
Parallax's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: South Dakota
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 15,391
QuoteOriginally posted by Joel B Quote
The one group we don't have in this area. Lots of Swedish but no Norwegian. Go figure.
Your climate is too mild.
02-19-2015, 12:57 PM   #14798
Moderator
Racer X 69's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: The Great Pacific Northwet
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 9,897
QuoteOriginally posted by r0ckstarr Quote
Possums' good eatin's.
There is a backwoods mountain town near me named Darrington. Settled in the late 1800's by prospectors and loggers who were mostly Tarheels from from the Carolinas. Today there are about 1,500 people living there, 473 households, and 292 families, and mostly 3 surnames, Nations (by far the largest of the populace), Cousins and Jones.

A clannish and very racially segregated town, Darrington today is still about 95% white. Since mining played out long ago, and logging has also slowed considerably, the area is quite economically depressed. A large portion of the families are receiving welfare, and education is lacking.

Since the folks who settled there came from an area where possum was considered a primary food source they brought them along. Some were turned loose and allowed to multiply (which possum will do quite well), and then hunted to put food on the table.

Today possum are considered an invasive species, and are everywhere. Their carcasses litter the roads, they invade chicken coops and barns, get into dog food that people leave out for their dogs, etc.

Oh, and there was at least one well known person who came from Darrington, Bob Barker, longtime host of The Price is Right was born there.

I bet he enjoyed a bowl of Possum Stew.

02-19-2015, 01:19 PM   #14799
Pentaxian




Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Texas
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 3,429
QuoteOriginally posted by Racer X 69 Quote
There is a backwoods mountain town near me named Darrington. Settled in the late 1800's by prospectors and loggers who were mostly Tarheels from from the Carolinas. Today there are about 1,500 people living there, 473 households, and 292 families, and mostly 3 surnames, Nations (by far the largest of the populace), Cousins and Jones.

A clannish and very racially segregated town, Darrington today is still about 95% white. Since mining played out long ago, and logging has also slowed considerably, the area is quite economically depressed. A large portion of the families are receiving welfare, and education is lacking.

Since the folks who settled there came from an area where possum was considered a primary food source they brought them along. Some were turned loose and allowed to multiply (which possum will do quite well), and then hunted to put food on the table.

Today possum are considered an invasive species, and are everywhere. Their carcasses litter the roads, they invade chicken coops and barns, get into dog food that people leave out for their dogs, etc.

Oh, and there was at least one well known person who came from Darrington, Bob Barker, longtime host of The Price is Right was born there.

I bet he enjoyed a bowl of Possum Stew.
Interesting information. Sounds like some of the small towns here.


I had an opossum that used to visit my yard on a daily basis around 4AM, to eat acorns or whatever else it could find in the grass. I figured it out because I wake up at 4AM and just happened to look out the window towards the back yard. Seen it over by the fence and watched it for a while. The next morning, I saw it again. Quickly, I figured out its routine and got up even earlier to watch it. It would climb under the fence, and never ventured more than about 6ft away from the fence. It would eat, then leave. It stayed about 5mins and was gone. I never bothered it and just let it be. I saw no harm in it being there. It wasn't getting anywhere near the house.

Well, a rabbit found the opossums entrance hole and decided to come in and make the space under my storage shed its home. I sort of understood why the rabbit wanted to move in. There's a lot of coyotes in the woods behind my fence. Sometimes they come right up to the fence. The rabbit was safe here. I allowed the rabbit to stay. It was like having a pet rabbit in a way, except that I never got close enough to touch it, nor ever intended to. I would cut up some lettuce and radishes, and he'd come out and eat them. Each time allowing me to get closer and closer to him as he got comfortable with my presence being there. I suspected that the rabbit was blind. Sudden movements didn't trigger him. It was always sound and footsteps that got his attention. I could swing my arm through the air and he wouldn't even flinch. But, put my foot down slightly on some dry leaves and he would look in my direction.

One night the rabbit decided that the food I was feeding him wasn't enough, got greedy, and ate a lot of my seed grown flowers. Then, the rabbit got evicted, the hole under the fence got closed up, and I haven't seen the rabbit or opossum since.


Last edited by r0ckstarr; 02-19-2015 at 01:25 PM.
02-19-2015, 02:03 PM   #14800
Site Supporter




Join Date: Apr 2011
Photos: Albums
Posts: 3,136
Not very often, but sometimes, I get a koala in my yard. I have seen them three times in 15 years but have seen some other evidences of past presence from time to time. They seem more common in the past few years. They make pig like noises in the creek reserve just nearby very often, as in almost daily I hear them, (I have a 4m boundary with it). I am getting my roof fixed because it broke enough I got an infestation of birds nesting in the roof. That would have led to holes for possums which you do not want in your roof. They make noise while alive, odour after they die and urinate on the top of the ceilings whilst still alive - and the only defence we are allowed to use is to seal off the roof so they cannot get it - but if they are already in and cannot get out you get all the aforesaid disadvantages at some time during the process.
02-19-2015, 07:52 PM   #14801
Veteran Member
Joel B's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
Photos: Albums
Posts: 2,336
QuoteOriginally posted by Racer X 69 Quote
And don't leave out the Germans in the Amana Colonies to your Northeast.
We also have a group that settled after the war. They were pow's and liked Iowa so well that when they went home, they gathered their families and moved right back!

QuoteOriginally posted by Parallax Quote
Your climate is too mild.
That's right! Them Nordic types are tough!

QuoteOriginally posted by r0ckstarr Quote
One night the rabbit decided that the food I was feeding him wasn't enough
"Wascally Wabbit!"
02-19-2015, 07:54 PM   #14802
Moderator
Site Supporter
MarkJerling's Avatar

Join Date: May 2012
Location: Wairarapa, New Zealand
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 5,775
QuoteOriginally posted by FantasticMrFox Quote
These birds are the devil's pets! I got swooped twice when I lived in Australia, even their eyes are red! Who cares about all the venomous stuff that can potentially kill you if you actually die crashing into a lamp post with your bicycle because you had to fend off one of these flying rats?!

A guy in my neuroscience tutorial group at uni was partially blind because a magpie rammed its beak into his right eye when he was a kid
You're right. Here by us the (I like your "Devil's Pets") evil critters have been know to dive-bomb cyclists. So far I've been lucky and they seem to avoid me. I keep a keen eye out though as I'm fully prepared to rip it out of the sky if it comes too close.
02-19-2015, 07:57 PM   #14803
Moderator
Site Supporter
MarkJerling's Avatar

Join Date: May 2012
Location: Wairarapa, New Zealand
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 5,775
QuoteOriginally posted by r0ckstarr Quote
Interesting information. Sounds like some of the small towns here.
One night the rabbit decided that the food I was feeding him wasn't enough, got greedy, and ate a lot of my seed grown flowers. Then, the rabbit got evicted, the hole under the fence got closed up, and I haven't seen the rabbit or opossum since.
I much prefer them looking like this. Taken at our local Kids Hunting Competition.

Last edited by MarkJerling; 02-02-2016 at 01:13 PM.
02-19-2015, 08:00 PM   #14804
Pentaxian




Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Wangaratta, Victoria
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 3,227
Since cyclists in Oz have been forced by law to wear helmets, they have been offered a little protection, but most helmets have holes to allow a little cooling air to flow through on one hand and to allow big nasty beaks to protrude through on the other. There are many cyclists who have long cable ties fixed to stand up like spikes to deter the maggies.
02-19-2015, 08:03 PM   #14805
Moderator
Site Supporter
MarkJerling's Avatar

Join Date: May 2012
Location: Wairarapa, New Zealand
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 5,775
QuoteOriginally posted by rod_grant Quote
Since cyclists in Oz have been forced by law to wear helmets, they have been offered a little protection, but most helmets have holes to allow a little cooling air to flow through on one hand and to allow big nasty beaks to protrude through on the other. There are many cyclists who have long cable ties fixed to stand up like spikes to deter the maggies.
Yes! Same here. We are not allowed to cycle without helmets and quite frankly, at the speed I get to down hills, I would not want to try it without a helmet. I've been known to get to over 80km/h.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
arctic cold, aussie shepherds, bacon, basque paella, beer, caffeine, camera, canada, catch 22, cheddar, cheese, dachsunds, dew, drink, dslr, gin, hair, igunaq, k-mount, k3, kids, lutefisk, maine, marital relations, mother, mountain, norm, patent, pentax k-3, pentax lens, possums, research, ricoh, rupert, sandwich, scotch, shirley, snoring, spam, study, toilet, tokyo, veggies, vermont, world
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
why I will buy a K3 chicagojohn Pentax K-3 80 09-18-2016 08:42 AM
Suggestion Neutralize the 'why I won't buy a k-3' thread crewl1 Site Suggestions and Help 61 10-04-2014 05:08 PM
Why I Won't Be Buying A K5IIs Racer X 69 Pentax K-5 40 02-03-2014 08:12 PM
Why I don't buy Pentax lenses keyser Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 44 12-20-2012 01:58 AM
I feel so old: 8 things the facebook gen won't buy Nesster General Talk 27 04-22-2012 11:01 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:06 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top