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08-20-2014, 01:59 PM   #1
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K-3... the essentials?

I'm interested in learning the perhaps non-obvious "what you need to know" tidbits in going from a K-30 to a K-3. Or maybe there aren't really any? Many thanks in advance.

08-20-2014, 02:30 PM   #2
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More MP and missing AA filter, so photos will have much more detail. The files will also be bigger, its good to have a reliable, fast SD card or two (Sandisk, Lexar are the preferred brands)
08-20-2014, 02:49 PM   #3
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I would add to NaHoruk that the K-3 benefits greatly from 'good glass' (high-quality lenses), like the DA Lts, FA Ltd series and other CZ, VL lenses.

With my DA18-250mm, I found that the increase in IQ from K-7 to K-3 is not as spectacular as with my FA31mm, FA77mm and DA15mm for example.

My 5 cents.
08-20-2014, 03:13 PM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by Na Horuk Quote
The files will also be bigger, its good to have a reliable, fast SD card or two (Sandisk, Lexar are the preferred brands)
That is the main one.

I would also add that if you don't already have a decent tripod that now is a good time to get one. The SR feature is great, but even a little bit of shake shows with the K-3 and a tripod can really help bring out the best the camera has to offer.


Steve

---------- Post added 08-20-14 at 03:18 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by hcc Quote
the K-3 benefits greatly from 'good glass'
This is true, but it has surprised me how many of my vintage lenses (most) are easily up to the challenge of the K-3's sensor. A good rule of thumb would be that if a lens performed well on your K-30, it will perform as well or better on the K-3.


Steve


Last edited by stevebrot; 08-20-2014 at 03:19 PM.
08-20-2014, 03:24 PM   #5
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Pay very close attention to the new autofocus functions in the K-3. Read the manual twice and practice - they are much more robust, especially Tracking AF. FWIW, I'm not there yet.
08-20-2014, 08:12 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by monochrome Quote
Read the manual twice
Read it three times The K-3 AFC options are particularly involved and require lots of study and practice to grok.

Also the ergonomics of the K-3 are new, at least coming from a K-5. Adjusting exposure mode and AF points on the fly in particular took some muscle memory re-adjustment.

I've also learnt to trust the auto AF and matrix metering more on the K-3 than other camera. It seems more intelligent. Takes some time to learn to let go.
08-21-2014, 10:45 AM   #7
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Spot metering is VERY restrictive to a small area!

I've found that spot metering on the K-3 has a VERY tiny sensitive area. As an example, I was photographing my black and white dog indoors - he has a white streak down the center of his black head to his nose. From across the room, I spot metered on that streak, and my picture was WAY underexposed. I shifted the spot metering to his black nose, and the picture was WAY overexposed. Changing metering to center-weighted in conjunction with spot focus has proved to be the winning combination for most of my photography.

John
08-21-2014, 12:30 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by PALADIN85020 Quote
I shifted the spot metering to his black nose, and the picture was WAY overexposed.
Yep, I would expect about 3 stops each way (5 stops total, black to white) if your meter was working correctly. That is how it is supposed to work.

The spot meter area is the about same as the center "( )" in the viewfinder and should be very abrupt by design.


Steve

08-21-2014, 12:49 PM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by PALADIN85020 Quote
I've found that spot metering on the K-3 has a VERY tiny sensitive area. As an example, I was photographing my black and white dog indoors - he has a white streak down the center of his black head to his nose. From across the room, I spot metered on that streak, and my picture was WAY underexposed. I shifted the spot metering to his black nose, and the picture was WAY overexposed. Changing metering to center-weighted in conjunction with spot focus has proved to be the winning combination for most of my photography.

John
QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
Yep, I would expect about 3 stops each way (5 stops total, black to white) if your meter was working correctly. That is how it is supposed to work.

The spot meter area is the about same as the center "( )" in the viewfinder and should be very abrupt by design.


Steve
Thanks for the head-up on spot metering. Are people getting generally better results with center-weighted or matrix metering?
08-21-2014, 11:14 PM - 1 Like   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by IchabodCrane Quote
Are people getting generally better results with center-weighted or matrix metering?
Spot metering is a specialized tool and when used properly can provide a meter reading (and by extension an appropriate exposure) where it would be otherwise difficult.

Here is an example using the spot meter:



The exposure reading was taken off the patch of smooth sand just outside the entry to the cave. The intent for that sand was to place its value at center of the histogram and to let the light and dark areas in the remainder of the frame fall where they may. The curves were later modified in post-processing to bring up more detail in the shadows and drop the highlights as well.

Matrix and center-weighted metering of the same scene resulted in excessive exposure for the cave walls and the outside beach and background being totally blown.


Steve
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