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09-30-2014, 12:50 PM   #16
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There are some good explanations of shift lenses around. This illustration is from one of them, showing how shift can help you keeping lines straight:



From http://joesweebledeebledeebly.weebly.com/tilt-shift.htm

As Aboudd says, the sensor shift is much less than the shift of a proper shift lens but it is definitely better than nothing. And it works for all lenses.

09-30-2014, 01:04 PM   #17
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shift lenses are all "front shift" (using large-format terminology).
Whereas sensor shift as Pentax does would be equivalent to "rear shift".

Michael
09-30-2014, 02:50 PM   #18
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I think I understand now. The advantage of the shift is that it allows less of an angle when shooting architecture. Ideally, if the camera was pointed parallel to the ground, and the shift allowed including the top of the building where it would be cropped out before shift, then the sides of the building would be straight. The moment the camera is tilted upwards, the keystone effect would happen. It looks like with the K-3 there would not be that much shift, but it would probably help. Again, I appreciate the multiple attempts to clarify this phenomenon and the shift option in live view.

John
09-30-2014, 04:26 PM   #19
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Excellent thread! Thanks for sharing.

09-30-2014, 06:15 PM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by PALADIN85020 Quote
It looks like with the K-3 there would not be that much shift, but it would probably help. Again, I appreciate the multiple attempts to clarify this phenomenon and the shift option in live view.
This video is interesting.
09-30-2014, 06:20 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by gaweidert Quote
Compared to a full frame camera how is the viewfinder. I have a K5 and a K5-IIs and find the viewfinder a bit of a challenge.
Same screen, same magnification, same size.

The viewfinder is excellent by dSLR standards and middling compared to any film SLR made in the early 1980s.


Steve

---------- Post added 09-30-14 at 06:23 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Aboudd Quote
I hope I explained this clearly.
Good job. The only better explanation would be found in any good book on using a view camera.


Steve
10-01-2014, 08:05 PM   #22
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Steve, thanks for the info. The latest price drop has my credit card screaming at me to get the K3.
10-02-2014, 04:11 AM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by gaweidert Quote
Steve, thanks for the info. The latest price drop has my credit card screaming at me to get the K3.
Actually there are some differences in the viewfinder of the K3 compared to K5II. I do discern the difference in use, and find the K3 slightly better, although the K5II is good.

10-24-2014, 10:05 AM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by Aboudd Quote
I have posted the second chapter of my extensive review of the Pentax K3 on my blog. This installment covers use of the K3 as an architectural camera using the live view composition adjustment feature. I tested it out during one of my regular assignments. I use the Canon with TS-E lenses as my clients sometimes require huge prints, however the K3 could replace the Canon for my travel work. I find this very exciting.

If you have interest in this feature you will find my review at Foto Gizmo Plus
Thanks for your thoughts on this feature. I am an architect and I shoot my own work for portfolio purposes. I am curios if lowering the tripod would give you the same change as you show in the interior shots in the blog, or am I thinking about it wrong?

Also, with my interiors, I usually adjusting converging lines in photoshop, as the planes are not too far out of whack. For exteriors though, I really need a lot of shift sometimes, and I don't know if this sensor shift buys me much for that. When I stretch these in PS, it really is some heavy lifting. I wonder if a little shift will help? I have been toying with the idea of going to Canon and getting the 17mm tse. Thoughts?
10-24-2014, 05:56 PM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by chiane Quote
I usually adjusting converging lines in photoshop
Have you tried something more directly focussed on making those kind of geometric corrections, like DxO ViewPoint?
10-24-2014, 06:19 PM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by rawr Quote
Have you tried something more directly focussed on making those kind of geometric corrections, like DxO ViewPoint?
I haven't, but thanks for heads up, I'll look into it. Does it work better? Photoshop does a decent job for me, I just have to do so much correction that it's just hard to frame correctly sometimes, which pp won't help no matter who does it. Picture standing 15 feet in front of a city house that's 3 stories tall and trying to get that in the frame. That's what I run into a lot.
10-24-2014, 06:38 PM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by chiane Quote
Does it work better?
It is very capable for making those kind of adjustments, as is DxO Optics Pro itself. ViewPoint is also quite easy to use.
QuoteOriginally posted by chiane Quote
Picture standing 15 feet in front of a city house that's 3 stories tall and trying to get that in the frame. That's what I run into a lot.
Well, there are always limits on what software can do alone. The more push and pull you do digitally, the more scope for image quality degradation. But using DxO Optics Pro and the 4 point adjustment rectangle, let alone using ViewPoint, I've done some pretty massive re-adjustments similar to what you describe. It helps if you have a lot of resolution to work with, and have framed the scene reasonably well.
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