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03-01-2016, 04:17 PM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by Flasher Quote
If you are using Adobe Camera RAW (ACR) to first load your DNG then click on the blue link at the bottom (shows image workflow settings) and change the resolution, colour space etc. to the size you want to work with. I use 300ppi, AdobeRGB and 16bit.

You should probably use sRGB if you are only printing from home or displaying on websites computers etc. and particularly if you don't have a wide gamut monitor and appropriate video card.

Also some of the Photoshop filters cannot work with 16bit colour but I change that in PS when required.

I have had the workflow settings change at one stage and I don't know why so it pays to check it every now and then and also when you buy a new camera.
The color space used has nothing to do with the monitor or video card used. Certainly a monitor that is capable of exhibiting close to full aRGB will be easier to nail color balance, but using a calibrated sRGB monitor will allow you to get more out of aRGB - especially if you willing to do a test print or two.

If anything, the better at-home photo dedicated printers available for the past 10 years or so will do far better at extracting full gamut than the mass printers - which are almost all based on sRGB output. Of course, if the outside printer handles ICMs, that's a different matter.

There is no difference when printing 8-bit or 16-bit images; how the image has been manipulated to get to final image is the key question - and this is where 16-bit is far less destructive. For a fuller range of 16-bit image handling, superior alternatives to Adobe converter and finishing programs do exist.

03-01-2016, 05:12 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by ScooterMaxi Jim Quote
The color space used has nothing to do with the monitor or video card used. Certainly a monitor that is capable of exhibiting close to full aRGB will be easier to nail color balance, but using a calibrated sRGB monitor will allow you to get more out of aRGB - especially if you willing to do a test print or two.

If anything, the better at-home photo dedicated printers available for the past 10 years or so will do far better at extracting full gamut than the mass printers - which are almost all based on sRGB output. Of course, if the outside printer handles ICMs, that's a different matter.

There is no difference when printing 8-bit or 16-bit images; how the image has been manipulated to get to final image is the key question - and this is where 16-bit is far less destructive. For a fuller range of 16-bit image handling, superior alternatives to Adobe converter and finishing programs do exist.
Scooter there is not much point in editing in AdobeRGB if your monitor can't display the full gamut of AdobeRGB. There is also not much point in printing on a full gamut printer when you cannot see the full gammut on the monitor. The weakest point (usually the monitor/video card) will determine the final colour space.

My point was if you only take photos for displaying on a screen or for home printing then stick to sRGB for colourspace continuity, if you are more serious then buy a full gamut monitor and video card and printer then work with AdobeRGB or higher if you need that level of gamut.

16 bit colour will help reduce banding while processing, but of course if the image is saved as a jpg it is only at 8 bit.

I find ACR does a great job of creating my workflow and I have no doubt there are better programs out there for 16 and even 32 bit processing but I find Adobe works very well for what I want and probably for the vast majority of photographers.

I agree calibrating the monitor (and printer if you can afford the printer calibrator) is essential.
03-01-2016, 09:19 PM - 1 Like   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by enoeske Quote
The camera does not output any dpi.
I agree...

QuoteOriginally posted by Alex645 Quote
I agree with #2.
I agree...

QuoteOriginally posted by Zafar Iqbal Quote
It's not fine - it's irrelevant.
I agree...

The DPI property is a clue for scaling intent for use by various rendering devices and nothing more. It does not change the image data or quality in any way. It does not affect monitor rendering (they auto-scale with no option to override) but may be useful when working with some print devices or for display with some software tools where window scales are in inches. Most printer drivers and tools such as Lightroom allow you to specify the print resolution and effectively override the DPI property to whatever you want.


Steve
03-02-2016, 12:26 PM   #19
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Thank you everyone for your input. I'm reading the replies and learning a lot about this.

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