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07-11-2014, 06:42 AM   #1
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Shooting through Glass

Hi all on the forum


an other Question,
I'm planning a trip to the zoo with my Granddaughter's when shooting through glass i.e. be it reptiles fish or whatever is there a best setting,
I know I have to consider the lighting,
but what is the best setting to use I have the K3 and plan on taking my Tamron 90mm macro lens


any other advice is welcome
Thanks
TomG

07-11-2014, 06:53 AM   #2
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Put the hood right on the glass to block stray light. If you need to angle the shot, use you hand to cup the gap between the hood and the glass. Don't even bother with flash.
07-11-2014, 06:53 AM   #3
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depends on a lot of things but mainly it depends if there are any reflections on the glass.also be aware if there is any dirt or marks on the glass.if there are, the camera will be focusing on those instead of your subject. you might need to get in manual mode on some occasions.flash is a no-no and just try to cover any reflections on the glass. other than that, there isnt much you can do really.
07-11-2014, 07:09 AM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by schnitzer79 Quote
depends on a lot of things but mainly it depends if there are any reflections on the glass.also be aware if there is any dirt or marks on the glass.if there are, the camera will be focusing on those instead of your subject. you might need to get in manual mode on some occasions.flash is a no-no and just try to cover any reflections on the glass. other than that, there isnt much you can do really.
Thank you for the quick replies
Tom G

07-11-2014, 07:26 AM   #5
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A good polarizing filter will definitely help cut glare.

Those collapsible rubber hoods that screw onto filter threads can be a better option than the stock tulip hoods -- you can press them flush against the glass without any gaps.

At our local zoo the only outdoor exhibit I regularly have trouble with is one that tends to get a lot of moisture/fog built up on one side of the enclosure and the other side is pretty badly scratched from assorted large cats and other animals. I don't think I've ever gotten a good clear photo through it. The indoor ones are fine except for the bats, since it's too dark to autofocus and I never seem to remember to bring a wide enough lens to get good depth of field.

At other zoos, the most popular behind-glass exhibits like polar bears and otters tend to be a pain to photograph because there are so many people there that it's very hard to position yourself at an angle where you're not catching someone's reflection in the glass. An ultra wide against the glass and cropping it down later is probably the best option there.
07-11-2014, 09:04 AM   #6
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Reflections are a killer -- trying to get as close to the glass as possible helps limit these. Using fast glass is really helpful too, because these places tend to be fairly dark and flash will kill any photo.

(shot with DA *55 through dirty glass)

07-11-2014, 09:15 AM   #7
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Pay close attention to reflections, be ready to manual focus because af is often really confused by reflections in the glass, dirt, smudges, etc. Don't even try to use flash. Be prepared to move around a lot, line up and focus your shots and then wait for people to move out of the way.

This shot from the Seattle Aquarium was taken through thick glass that had hand smudges on it. Auto focus with my 40mm XS just racked back and forth but I was able to switch to me 55mm SuperTak and manual focus it just fine. You can get some great shots with patience and practice.

07-11-2014, 09:41 AM   #8
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I tend to shoot everything at the zoo with a long telephoto. (55-300 & last visit 150-500)

At my local zoo the only things that need a short lens don't have enough light anyway. The big exhibits with glass (lions, tigers, penguins) all have thick build-ups of hand print/nose print/snot from thousands of kids and the zoo never washes them. (At least it seems that way)

Shoot in RAW and ad contrast in post.





















https://www.flickr.com/photos/benmcgann/sets/72157627227231742/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/benmcgann/sets/72157632842732646/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/benmcgann/sets/72157639841463804/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/benmcgann/sets/72157639950994783/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/benmcgann/sets/72157645181488231/


Last edited by boriscleto; 07-11-2014 at 09:54 AM.
07-11-2014, 10:03 AM   #9
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Bring a cloth and a little spray bottle of window cleaner.

Shoot as perpendicular to the glass as possible for less distortion. This is especially important with thicker glass and/or when shooting into an aquarium.

A rubber lens hood can be a big help as mentioned. Brace yourself against the glass to hold steady. Wash the window after you're done to get your hand prints off it if you're a greasy/oily sort of person (I am).

Some displays will be behind old plastic that's really scratched up- these can be a waste of time photography-wise.

On camera flash will be pretty useless, but if you can get the flash off camera with the help of an assistant you can get great reflection free results (not the most practical at a zoo, but doable with another pair of willing hands).

I'll also recommend shooting in RAW if you don't already. White Balance can be a nightmare in indoor exhibits, and RAW let's you adjust after the fact at no loss. This alone is worth it.

Don't be totally shy of reflections- the animal behind glass with your grand daughters reflection superimposed over it is a pretty overdone cliche, but when it's your own kids go for it.

Don't forget to have fun on this family outing
07-11-2014, 05:17 PM   #10
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Plenty of good tips above. Get close to the glass if possible and use a wide aperture to hide the glass.

Please, no flash at the zoo, even if you can work out a way to get it to improve your photo. It bothers other visitors and stresses out the animals.
07-12-2014, 04:21 AM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by boriscleto Quote
I tend to shoot everything at the zoo with a long telephoto. (55-300 & last visit 150-500)

At my local zoo the only things that need a short lens don't have enough light anyway. The big exhibits with glass (lions, tigers, penguins) all have thick build-ups of hand print/nose print/snot from thousands of kids and the zoo never washes them. (At least it seems that way)

Shoot in RAW and ad contrast in post.





















https://www.flickr.com/photos/benmcgann/sets/72157627227231742/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/benmcgann/sets/72157632842732646/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/benmcgann/sets/72157639841463804/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/benmcgann/sets/72157639950994783/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/benmcgann/sets/72157645181488231/
Hi Boriscleto and others
They are nice shots If I get as good as them I will be happy


Thanks for the replies to all forum users
Tom G
07-12-2014, 07:23 AM   #12
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A rubber lens hood or keep the lens flat against the glass to prevent reflections. Normal exposure metering. Adjust white balance for any artificial lighting. Children press against the lower portions and adults lean against the center of the glass which smudges and scratches it there. Shoot through the upper corners and sides of the viewing window.These were all taken through glass.












07-14-2014, 12:19 AM   #13
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Great set I enjoyed your effort keep em coming

cheers
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