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09-10-2016, 11:27 AM   #16
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I've used my mind shift 180 for two years now. I use it skiing and for day hikes. Camel back spot. The 180 part holds my k1 and 28-105. I don't have to get off my bike either to use it. Top compartment I use for whatever...occasionally an extra lens. I have piles of other bags.

09-10-2016, 11:54 AM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by nomadkng Quote
wow, you've put a lot of effort into gear combinations.

for me, ive decided i'm a photographer first and the only reason i hike is to GET to my photography destinations. all hikes are to preplanned destinations.

once i concluded that, i realized the only option was to cart my gear from photo stop to photo stop completely secure in a backpack. if a photo op comes along, i will decide if i am willing to unpack my gear and set up my tripod. if not, keep moving with no remorse.

things are much simpler for me that way and i don't find myself worrying about gear dangling from harnesses or getting damaged in a fall. it all stays in my backpack until i want to use it.

some of this is also the result of having lost gear over the years while trying to be ready at a moment's notice. i've lost a couple lenses to slips and falls and a body to a stream in an ill advised attempt to fjord it without gear properly stowed.

i won't risk it any more. that, and i've become far more critical of what i take photos of. not every "pretty" scene is photo worthy due to lighting etc. sometimes i just pause, think, oh that's nice and enjoy the moment before continuing on. it certainly speeds up my hiking and in a lot of ways has relived some of the stress because i'm not trying to capture "everything".

the only photography i'm doing in which i do need my kit ready and waiting is my bird and wildlife work. then i'm lugging around a giant lens on a monopod, so my hiking distance is limited anyway.
What he said 100%. A hike is the scouting mission that happens before a photo shoot. Bring a point & shoot. A photo shoot involves trekking in while porting photo gear. Document it with a point & shoot.
09-10-2016, 12:44 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by nomadkng Quote
wow, you've put a lot of effort into gear combinations.

for me, ive decided i'm a photographer first and the only reason i hike is to GET to my photography destinations. all hikes are to preplanned destinations.

once i concluded that, i realized the only option was to cart my gear from photo stop to photo stop completely secure in a backpack. if a photo op comes along, i will decide if i am willing to unpack my gear and set up my tripod. if not, keep moving with no remorse.

things are much simpler for me that way and i don't find myself worrying about gear dangling from harnesses or getting damaged in a fall. it all stays in my backpack until i want to use it.

some of this is also the result of having lost gear over the years while trying to be ready at a moment's notice. i've lost a couple lenses to slips and falls and a body to a stream in an ill advised attempt to fjord it without gear properly stowed.

i won't risk it any more. that, and i've become far more critical of what i take photos of. not every "pretty" scene is photo worthy due to lighting etc. sometimes i just pause, think, oh that's nice and enjoy the moment before continuing on. it certainly speeds up my hiking and in a lot of ways has relived some of the stress because i'm not trying to capture "everything".

the only photography i'm doing in which i do need my kit ready and waiting is my bird and wildlife work. then i'm lugging around a giant lens on a monopod, so my hiking distance is limited anyway.
You certainly have a very good point here !

---------- Post added 09-10-16 at 09:45 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Eagle94VT Quote
I've used my mind shift 180 for two years now. I use it skiing and for day hikes. Camel back spot. The 180 part holds my k1 and 28-105. I don't have to get off my bike either to use it. Top compartment I use for whatever...occasionally an extra lens. I have piles of other bags.
Which model do you own ?
09-10-2016, 01:23 PM   #19
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If your main interest is landscape photography you will usually (but not always) have time to unload a camera and tripod from a backpack and set them up before the opportunity disappears, but fleeting wildlife shots require something more accessible, even if the solution carries some disadvantages.
At the moment I usually have my K-3 with DA*300mm and TC clipped to a Peak Design Capture Pro with a ProPad, with this and other lenses attached to a Tamrac belt. I usually support the camera with my left hand when walking, which keeps it from moving around too much and gives me some reassurance, though I realize that if I fall that could be a problem. I took the advice of a previous poster and apply some Teflon dry lubricant spray onto the Capture clip and plate from time to time to prevent them from jamming. This is OK for me for up to 8-10 km. I usually shoot hand held, but there's always the option of carrying a tripod in a backpack. This solution would be less cumbersome with a more compact lens setup, but it's the best I can do to meet my own needs.

09-10-2016, 01:47 PM   #20
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I use the Clik Elite Pro Body Sport backpack $87.50 along with the Clik Elite telephoto SLR chest carrier at $39.98)This combo allows instant access to your camera and telephoto lens, in my case an F*300. The backpack also swings out for easy side access as well to another camera or lens.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/767484-REG/Clik_Elite_CE708GR_ProBody...pack_Gray.html

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/767458-REG/Clik_Elite_CE704GR_Telepho...t_Carrier.html


Last edited by Driline; 09-10-2016 at 06:59 PM.
09-10-2016, 02:53 PM   #21
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For me I like to go light, so lenses in individual cases on the belt has the lenses in a handy spot, and is a lot easier to carry a long distance than a backpack or sling. The DA*300 fits nicely into a Lowepro Lens Exchange Case 200 AW, which is great for changing lenses. Although most of the time I'm walking with the 300 mounted on the camera (for wildlife) and strapped to a Black Rapid sling for comfort. Batteries, filters etc can be carried in my pockets, a small belt mounted bag could be used too. If I had to go through really rugged terrain i would add a holster bag for those times you have to use your hands to climb. If I need to take a lot more gear I have a Tenba sling bag that works really well, you can slide it in front of you and it works like a table with walls. This may work better for some people. My biggest problem with slings and backpacks is that they can get warm after a while. Carrying gear seems to be something that few people really agree on. You may have to try a few different things, and everybody here has something that works for them, one of those ideas may work for you, and maybe a combination of two or more. I know there is no one solution that works for me with every situation, about the only constant is the Black Rapid, and I even take those off if I may shoot from inside the car, which is not unusual. The reason is so I don't pull over, grab the camera and catch the strap on the gear shift.
09-10-2016, 05:29 PM   #22
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When I go for a hike I focus on equipment protection, comfort carrying the equipment, cost and accessibility That said, I currently use Mountainsmith for all my equipment.

In fact, I recently purchased a backpack for my 645z system. Mountainsmith Backpacks | B&H Photo Video

They are relatively inexpensive and very comfortable all day long. Best feature is that it opens up, shoulder straps up, so when you lay it in the dirt, the straps stay clean. If it's muddy I put the All Weather cover on to keep the back of the pack clean. I haven't found another backpack designed this way.

I think I spent $145 for a backpack that I think is one of, if not the, best available!~ Check it out at B&H or their website.
09-11-2016, 02:00 AM   #23
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Interesting to read how people solve this in different ways.

QuoteOriginally posted by C_Jones Quote
I usually carry one camera/lens combination in my hands and leave any other camera/lens plus accessories in my backpack if the terrain allows me to do it. If the terrain does not allow hand carrying of one camera/lens combination, then in order to be safe I keep my camera(s) and lense(s) in the backpack until I reach points where I want to shoot and unpack them.
This is my approach, too. First priority is to have a good backpack for heavy carrying. Photo equipment goes in there, then I cross-wrap the neck strap three times around my wrist (to take most of the weight) and carry the camera with my choice lens in hand.

Of course, for me hiking comes first, photography second - unless I'm on my own.

09-11-2016, 05:15 AM - 1 Like   #24
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I guess the official name to my backpack is the Rotation 180. Here are a few views with my K1 + new 28-105 with the lens hood mounted. The K3 + 18-135 fits with even more room. Fits awkwardly with the battery grip. For those with the 24-70 - I have the Canon EOS1v (film) and the Tamron 24-70 and it is a very tight fit and probably not the right bag.

(1) Inside the rotation spot and a couple batteries in the velcro section (2) in the top purely for size reference (3) then all closed up. I have lots of bags like everyone, but this is the go-to for day hiking, biking, etc. I'll often carry a prime or tele lens in a pouch in the top section. Overall, I like its simplicity. For more photocentric trips I used the Lowepro Whistler 350 to carry pretty much everything. Sorry about how big the snap shots came out!
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09-12-2016, 03:14 AM   #25
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"How to carry gear on hikes ? "

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09-12-2016, 11:18 AM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by Cmely Quote
<snipped for brevity...> I'm usually carrying
  • K1 Body
  • Pentax 300mm lens
  • Pentax 28-105 mm lens
  • Sigma 70mm macro
Check the larger models of LowePro convertible sling bags that might fit the 300mm attached to K1. You can hike with the bag on your back for comfort, then rotate it to your chest for quick access.

In practice, though, I find that "quick" access isn't quick enough. For fleeting wildlife opportunities, anything less than camera-in-hand can be too slow. I therefore mix up hikes alternating between 2 modes:

1) If I expect a reasonable opportunity for wildlife as I hike, I carry my camera in hand. I use the same trick that someone else mentioned of wrapping the strap around my wrist so I cant drop the camera. This can only be done with good trail conditions because a trip with my hand tied up like that would be bad for me and the camera.

2) When I need 2 free hands, everything goes on my back. I carry a small Ricoh GR in a belt pouch for quick quality landscapes.
09-12-2016, 11:51 AM   #27
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You'll feel pretty dumb bringing a backpack, photo or otherwise,
if your hike includes squeezing through narrow rock crevices...

Chris
09-12-2016, 12:00 PM   #28
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They make WGs for that.
09-12-2016, 12:10 PM   #29
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Bienvenue au forum.

It depends on the hike you want to make.
For a leisurely hike, my approach is an Aqua-Cam bag from Ortlieb in a standard or large daypack.
The camera is outside the bag on a slingshot - for me this is perfectly acceptable.
If you want to have all in reach, you could carry the Aqua-Cam bag in front of you using the optional carrying system.

Their Day-Shot seems to be nice, but I don't know if the additional space for other than photographic equipment is enough for you.
For me it seems a bit small.

For a more serious hike with some bits of climbing you want to store the camera in the bag - at least for the difficult bits.

Kata could have interesting things for you as well.

Michael
09-12-2016, 12:27 PM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by Clou Quote
Bienvenue au forum.

It depends on the hike you want to make.
For a leisurely hike, my approach is an Aqua-Cam bag from Ortlieb in a standard or large daypack.
The camera is outside the bag on a slingshot - for me this is perfectly acceptable.
If you want to have all in reach, you could carry the Aqua-Cam bag in front of you using the optional carrying system.

Their Day-Shot seems to be nice, but I don't know if the additional space for other than photographic equipment is enough for you.
For me it seems a bit small.

For a more serious hike with some bits of climbing you want to store the camera in the bag - at least for the difficult bits.

Kata could have interesting things for you as well.

Michael
I second the suggestion to try the Aqua-Cam by Ortlieb. I use it for pretty long hikes in Northern Norway with the shoulder harnas. The last hike was with the K-3, DA*16-50 and the Pentax 1.4 rear converter. One advantage of this solution is that it is waterproof. If you have a tumble when crossing a stream everything inside the bag should stay dry. I even used it in combination with pack rafting.
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