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04-11-2017, 02:55 PM   #91
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Gave this a lot of thought. I always come back to William Henry Jackson. Lugging an 11" x 14" glass plate, wet process view camera all over the west. Losing a whole season of shots when a mule slipped and fell down a cliff. The mule was unharmed but all his negatives were shattered. First to photograph Yellowstone etc. In fact his whole life fascinates me. Artist, photographer, Civil War Soldier, bullwhacker on the Oregon trail etc. No idea how he made it to 99 years old.

04-12-2017, 02:17 PM   #92
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QuoteOriginally posted by wildman Quote
I just ran across this on YouTube.
It's well done and covers some of the great classic photographers of the 20th cent.
Good quality and you can DL a high def version for your own
There are some great images there -including by people I'd never heard of - thanks for sharing


William Henry Jackson - yes - never underestimate the pioneers - so much we take for granted they had to struggle with or invent - thanks

Last edited by ffking; 04-12-2017 at 02:36 PM.
04-12-2017, 03:18 PM - 2 Likes   #93
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Of course I love the classic masters of the Western landscape like Adams, Curtis, or Weston. I can't say I have a favorite but I admire each of their distinct styles and preferred subjects.
For contemporary photographers I really like Adam Barker and Jimmy Chin. Barker has more of a polished commercial look (but has it so dialed and just nails it every time) and Chin is also one of the best climber/skier/mountaineers on earth which gives him perspectives the rest of us can only dream of.

Jimmy Chin would be my favorite living photographer if I had to pick one. I really like all of his work. I have a print of his from Everest on my office wall. He takes these amazing photos in the most inhospitable places imaginable and they are always beautifully composed and technically perfect. Then I find out he did it while swinging at the end of a rope off the side of a mountain to get the right perspective.

Respect!
04-12-2017, 08:49 PM   #94
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OK , without question my personal favorite is Jim Marshal . I'm also quite fond of László Moholy-Nagy and John Menapace.

04-13-2017, 02:53 AM - 1 Like   #95
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Here's a great article with 7 things we can learn from Yousuf Karsh to improve our own photography:
7 Things Yousuf Karsh Can Teach You About Photography
04-13-2017, 07:36 AM - 1 Like   #96
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QuoteOriginally posted by mattb123 Quote
Jimmy Chin would be my favorite living photographer if I had to pick on
thanks for that - very impressive - a lot of adventurers take very nice pictures because they go to extraordinary places, but he adds a real photographers eye as well.
04-24-2017, 10:40 PM   #97
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It's funny, probably my favorite photographer--Lee Friedlander--is about as far as possible from the type of photos I take. Maybe it's that I really respect a kind of photography that I have no eye for myself.



04-25-2017, 05:46 AM   #98
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QuoteOriginally posted by abruzzi Quote
It's funny, probably my favorite photographer--Lee Friedlander--is about as far as possible from the type of photos I take. Maybe it's that I really respect a kind of photography that I have no eye for myself.
Possibly not as unusual as one might think - sometimes we see general principles or ideas more clearly when applied to subject matter we're not struggling with ourselves, perhaps - thanks for that

04-26-2017, 06:09 AM   #99
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QuoteOriginally posted by wildman Quote
2. Holly Andres
From the, apparently, mundane to the sublime, from kitsch to art? But you need to see her full collection to know where she is going with it.
Hard to articulate but she got to me. Perhaps it's that Midwestern middle America ambiance that I know so well - my own roots. Perhaps its the women's viewpoint.
Even her technique is sort of point and shot to the level of an art form. At the end of the day she spoke to me with her images and that's all that really matters.
I had never heard of Andres so I visited her website. For my money, she just tries too hard and her work is too clever by half. But then, that's why there are choices. I appreciate being made aware of her.
04-26-2017, 07:01 AM   #100
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QuoteOriginally posted by AggieDad Quote
For my money, she just tries too hard and her work is too clever by half.
I don't disagree. I shouldn't like her images but I did. At the gut level she got to me. It's more visceral than intellectual.

Sometimes an image can speak to me in mysterious ways that I don't understand. Rather like when I first looked closely at 40000 year old cave paintings - there was some kind of primal power there that I don't understand intellectually but it's clearly there for me. So with her.

But that's what keeps photography, in the broadest sense, interesting to me - the ultimate mystery of why some images work and some don't.

At the end of the day, on some level, every photo is a sort of Rorschach inkblot for the individual to "read" but you must have a sense of the syntax of the image before it's readable.

Last edited by wildman; 04-26-2017 at 07:24 AM.
04-26-2017, 08:43 AM - 1 Like   #101
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QuoteOriginally posted by wildman Quote
At the end of the day, on some level, every photo is a sort of Rorschach inkblot for the individual to "read" but you must have a sense of the syntax of the image before it's readable.
I would plead that folks don't try to read my inkblots. It could end up with me being taken away - not because the images have much meaning, but because I am obviously deranged for thinking some of my images are not half-bad.

My own personal favorites?
I have to go back to the film guys. Their post processing was much more arduous and tedious, and I admire their perseverance.

I also like anyone who took pictures of Audrey Hepburn. First of all because you must have been already pretty good to have the opportunity to photograph her, and second, because all photos of Audrey Hepburn are great. Wait... Maybe I just like Audrey Hepburn.
04-26-2017, 09:50 AM   #102
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QuoteOriginally posted by AggieDad Quote
My own personal favorites?
I have to go back to the film guys. Their post processing was much more arduous and tedious, and I admire their perseverance.
If I had to decide on one and only one I would ask myself the question - "who has made the most photos that I wish, I myself had taken", it would be...

...Josef Sudek (17 March 1896, Kolín, Bohemia – 15 September 1976, Prague) Czech photographer.
More than technique I value most in a image a certain sense of mystery and poetry - without that an image seems to me to be more or less lifeless.

Josef Sudek - Wikipedia




..

...
11-07-2017, 05:56 AM - 1 Like   #103
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I've been looking at stuff by Alex Webb recently - some impressive 'Street' there
11-08-2017, 04:46 AM   #104
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QuoteOriginally posted by ffking Quote
I've been looking at stuff by Alex Webb recently - some impressive 'Street' there
Sure ... you can often get figures that aren't doing anything interesting in street photography, but he finds a way ...

04-15-2018, 05:13 AM   #105
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I could have sworn somebody mentioned Bruce Percy among contemporary photographers, but I can't find the reference, so maybe not - anyway, there's some impressive stuff here

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