Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
09-26-2018, 12:14 PM - 1 Like   #16
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
wtlwdwgn's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Billings, MT
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 12,509
Make sure to lock up all your stuff where it isn't visible and don't do it the parking lot where people can see you do it. I wouldn't bring a lot of lenses. I take my D FA 28-105 and only take it off for wildlife. Even indoors the 28-105 will likely be enough. If you don't have at least 400mm don't bother taking pics of the wildlife. Just sit and enjoy.







09-26-2018, 01:43 PM   #17
PDL
Pentaxian




Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: PNW USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,006
QuoteOriginally posted by Mach Quote
Amazing information!
I'm taking my parents with me. Their mobility is limited. This isn't exactly a photography trip but its Yellowstone so why not!
I'm flying into saltlake city.
I have a tripod and a K1.
Thanks again!
Be careful using your tripod as there are safety considerations. Blocking a trail or boardwalk is a big no-no and can get you a visit from a Ranger.

Side note: My buddy and I went to Teton\Yellowstone during the summer after graduating from college. He had two (2) SLR's and I had three (3) removing the need to swap out film. I had Kodachrome 25 in one, Ektachrome 160 in another and Ektachorome IR in the third. However, when we say some puts setting his tripod up in the middle of the boardwalk blocking the way, we just waited until the cable release was tripped and one of us would kick the tripod. Not hard enough to make it collapse, but enough to ruin the shot. Then we would stand there next to each other and explain that blocking the boardwalk/trail was a safety hazard because you know the water running under the boardwalk was 190F and water boils at Yellowstone's average altitude at 196F.

Ask a ranger about setting up tripods, they are pretty knowledgeable and very helpful.

PS: I have been to Yellowstone at least eight times, it is a great place to visit. I have not been there since going digital though.
09-26-2018, 02:02 PM   #18
Junior Member




Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: PA/SC
Posts: 39
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by PDL Quote
Be careful using your tripod as there are safety considerations. Blocking a trail or boardwalk is a big no-no and can get you a visit from a Ranger.

Side note: My buddy and I went to Teton\Yellowstone during the summer after graduating from college. He had two (2) SLR's and I had three (3) removing the need to swap out film. I had Kodachrome 25 in one, Ektachrome 160 in another and Ektachorome IR in the third. However, when we say some puts setting his tripod up in the middle of the boardwalk blocking the way, we just waited until the cable release was tripped and one of us would kick the tripod. Not hard enough to make it collapse, but enough to ruin the shot. Then we would stand there next to each other and explain that blocking the boardwalk/trail was a safety hazard because you know the water running under the boardwalk was 190F and water boils at Yellowstone's average altitude at 196F.

Ask a ranger about setting up tripods, they are pretty knowledgeable and very helpful.

PS: I have been to Yellowstone at least eight times, it is a great place to visit. I have not been there since going digital though.
Thanks!
I was in Charlotte and started taking a picture of a monster building. security stopped me. I rarely take my camera into the city. Turns out the building was the bank of America building. Ignorance is not an excuse so thanks for the heads up

09-26-2018, 02:05 PM - 1 Like   #19
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
pschlute's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Surrey, UK
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 4,558
One final thing. Do try and go "wolf-watching" at dusk. Ask one of the rangers during the day where folks gather and they will tell you. It was either the Lamar Valley or the Hayden Valley when i went there. Dont expect to get any actual pictures as the animals will be out of range no matter what lens you have. But the wolf-watchers themselves are a friendly bunch and will let you have a peek through their spotting scopes. We saw cubs at play in the Lamar Valley after an unsuccessful visit to the Hayden Valley. I captured this picture of a fed-up wolf-watcher there....

Attached Images
View Picture EXIF
PENTAX K10D  Photo 
09-26-2018, 02:08 PM   #20
Junior Member




Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: PA/SC
Posts: 39
Original Poster
Lol that's a funny comment to the picture.

09-26-2018, 03:56 PM - 1 Like   #21
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
Wingincamera's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Spanaway, WA. USA
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,008
When you go try and have at least one WR lens with you. A few years ago we went there and it rained almost every day, and lots of fog. We were traveling via motorcycle/sidecar rig, so not too many opportunities to be changing lenses. My Pentax 18-135 WR lens stayed on the camera most of the time and glad I had it. In spite of the weather, we had a great time.
Nothing like being stopped in a long line of cars because of Bison blocking the road. One time while stopped a mother bison was nursing her calf while just a few feet away from the sidecar, with a male bison a few feet away snotting at us. We couldn't go anywhere, just remained still until they decided to move on. My wife could have reached out and touched the calf. I would have liked a picture, but I didn't want to make any movement that might spook them.
09-26-2018, 05:44 PM   #22
Veteran Member




Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 824
QuoteOriginally posted by Mach Quote
If anyone has any recommendations on locations I'd love to hear them.
QuoteOriginally posted by jddwoods Quote
I would say when I go back, which I will do, I will bring the 16-85 which will be for about 80% of what I would photograph in Yellowstone, The 15 Limited will be for situations where a really wide angle or light weight is needed. No surprise here, you will see wildlife and when we were able to photograph bears and bison I would not feel safe doing it with the 16-85. I would rather have a safer distance and the 55-300 PLM on the camera. If you have these two zooms or equivalent they should cover nearly everything.
Much good advice already. My best advice would be similar to what you got from jddwoods, quoted here. I went right after getting a dslr, and did not have a good long lens, so the two zoom lenses of reasonable quality with 16 mm wide and 300 mm long will mostly be enough, except for when you want to capture an eagle nesting, in which case the Mt. Palomar telescope would not be long enough. I did not have an ultra-wide, but I'm thinking I would not have used it very often. I went with others (family) so that limited how much time and creativity I could put into the photos. In that case, the flexibility of good zooms will help also. I liked my photos that were not just the usual iconic places. My photos of the lodge by Old Faithful seemed be better to me than pictures of Old Faithful itself. I also like the photos including my family, so be sure to involve your group on occasion. Have fun and be amazed - Yellowstone is truly a remarkable place.
09-26-2018, 10:08 PM   #23
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
DW58's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Rural Oregon
Posts: 5,611
Plenty of photo ops in Yellowstone. You can usually find wildlife in the Hayden Valley. But not always. If it's cold out the Firehole River is a nice spot. Of course there are an endless number of hot springs, paint pots and geysers. Now here's the spot not many tourists get to. Find the town of Kelly north of Jackson. Drive to Lower Slide Lake. And keep going. Some amazing views of the Tetons up in the Gros Ventres. If you have four wheel drive and enough gas you can go all the way to Dubois. Back in the 70's we'd camp at Soda Lake and catch monster Cutthroat. Another off the beaten path spot is accessed through the elk refuge. Great views of the Tetons and Sheep Mountain. Better known as Sleeping Indian. My parents favorite spot to ride horses. We spread both their ashes up there.
The whole area of northwest Wyoming is beautiful. You'll have a good time. If the timing is right the quaking aspen will be turning which always adds some nice color. Have fun. Looking forward to seeing some of your memories of your trip.

09-27-2018, 03:34 PM   #24
PDL
Pentaxian




Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: PNW USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,006
Security was wrong.

QuoteOriginally posted by Mach Quote
Thanks!
I was in Charlotte and started taking a picture of a monster building. security stopped me. I rarely take my camera into the city. Turns out the building was the bank of America building. Ignorance is not an excuse so thanks for the heads up
If you were not inside the building but were standing on the sidewalk outside the building then security can not stop you from photography.


Note the if: When standing in a public space you can photograph nearly everything. From Wikipedia:
"Photography may be prohibited or restricted by a property owner on their property. However, a property owner generally cannot restrict the photographing of the property by individuals who are not within the bounds of the property." my emphasis.
Photography and the law - Wikipedia

We have been through this before, rental-security can not stop you from photographing when in a public space - like a sidewalk.
09-27-2018, 03:37 PM   #25
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
wtlwdwgn's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Billings, MT
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 12,509
Gee, I hope Mach brought his long johns. It's gonna be nippy there this weekend.
09-27-2018, 07:11 PM   #26
Junior Member




Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: PA/SC
Posts: 39
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by wtlwdwgn Quote
Gee, I hope Mach brought his long johns. It's gonna be nippy there this weekend.
Haha, I'm from PA. They are packed!

09-27-2018, 08:21 PM   #27
Pentaxian
SpecialK's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: So California
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 16,112
I don't know about the landscape aspect, but these are a few I like from my travels in the area.

The barn in Mormon Row near Moose (Jackson).


Black Pool.


Old Faithful in the morning as I was walking away.


Prismatic Spring.


White Dome, not my camera.




Mammoth Terraces.


Palette Spring.


The falls are amazing.







This is a bit of a strenous hike.


Hayden Valley.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
landscape, photography, recommendations, yellowstone
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Recommendations for landscape photography locations West Denver area Mach General Photography 11 10-01-2018 10:38 AM
Landscape or portrait orientation? Definitely landscape! keithw General Photography 18 01-12-2018 06:17 AM
Photography Belt/Harness Recommendations, especially Arcaswiss. BruceBanner Pentax Camera and Field Accessories 13 08-29-2017 05:45 PM
Recommend a lens for landscape/urban landscape photography a96agli Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 23 01-22-2015 10:26 AM
Need recommendations on my kit (75/25 portrait/landscape) krypticide Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 10 11-15-2008 04:36 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:08 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top