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12-29-2018, 08:00 AM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by Rondec Quote
Personally, when I am with my family, I like to take photos for a bit and then put down the camera and just enjoy their company. Yes, I can interact with my kids while taking their photos, but it isn't quite the same thing and they tend to be a lot stiffer when I am constantly snapping their photos. If I am honest, I don't really need 300 photos of them at the zoo looking first at the monkeys and then at the lion and then at the zebras. I either delete a lot of those or just let them sit on a hard drive.

When I'm not with my family, then the point of my being out is specifically photography and I don't care how many photos I take.

I would say that the biggest issue I see is that folks don't do enough creation of photo books. I make one every year with plenty of journaling in them. To me, a combination of photos and written recollections is the best way for me and my kids to remember past trips and events. Memories are lost over time if they aren't used and simply the act of my writing them down fixes them better in my mind and as my children look at them down the road they also remember these things better.

I do wonder about all of the millions of photos that are on folks cell phones or somewhere in the cloud. If you die, those are probably lost. The concept of finding a shoe box or two full of photos is a foreign one in today's climate where everything is stored on phones and the interwebs.

---------- Post added 12-29-18 at 07:00 AM ----------



I think it really depends on what you are doing. If you are out hiking with your family, having a camera will probably be a natural part of that experience. If you are playing a board game or just sitting in a room having a conversation, then not so much. It probably depends as well on the age of family members and how they respond to having their photo snapped periodically.

I used to take more photos, but I realized that going to a museum and taking photos of all the exhibits that I later delete wasn't actually enhancing my enjoyment of anything. But you are right that each of us needs to do the things that make us happy and not worry about some little study about taking photos and memories.
We’re an example of people who have kept decades of photos documenting our marriage and children growing. We have ten feet of shelving with albums of 4x6 prints 6 to a page with my wife’s notes below each one. She currently blogs daily, often scanning one of those prints and adding it to the blog to illustrate her commentary, usually about the nature of change and the passing of time, or just for the fun of seeeing us in younger days. We continue to add prints from phones (the contemporary automatic snapshot camera) and cameras.

Most of these arn’t art - they’re just snaps of people at places, but they’re valuable. We booth have inherited portraits and prints created as early as the 1870’s and into the 1980’s. They illustrate the stories of people and places told by our grandparents and by us to our children. They give us a sense of family, and of place in the river of time.

I should also say at the time we took one or two photos and simply enjoyed the rest of the outing or party together, but the photos do anchor the memories.

12-29-2018, 08:39 AM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by monochrome Quote
We’re an example of people who have kept decades of photos documenting our marriage and children growing. We have ten feet of shelving with albums of 4x6 prints 6 to a page with my wife’s notes below each one. She currently blogs daily, often scanning one of those prints and adding it to the blog to illustrate her commentary, usually about the nature of change and the passing of time, or just for the fun of seeeing us in younger days. We continue to add prints from phones (the contemporary automatic snapshot camera) and cameras.

Most of these arn’t art - they’re just snaps of people at places, but they’re valuable. We booth have inherited portraits and prints created as early as the 1870’s and into the 1980’s. They illustrate the stories of people and places told by our grandparents and by us to our children. They give us a sense of family, and of place in the river of time.

I should also say at the time we took one or two photos and simply enjoyed the rest of the outing or party together, but the photos do anchor the memories.
For sure.

I have three brothers and three sisters and we still get together every year at Christmas time. I have lots of snaps of my nieces and nephews growing up as well as my own children. As you say, they aren't art photos, but they do indicate something about the passage of time and can jog the memory banks a few years from now.

One such photo from last week...

12-29-2018, 09:01 AM - 1 Like   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by Rondec Quote
For sure.

I have three brothers and three sisters and we still get together every year at Christmas time. I have lots of snaps of my nieces and nephews growing up as well as my own children. As you say, they aren't art photos, but they do indicate something about the passage of time and can jog the memory banks a few years from now.

One such photo from last week...

5 minutes - and they had fun doing it - then we had dinner and LR conversation.

Clearly just a snap from a daughter’s phone.
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Last edited by monochrome; 12-29-2018 at 09:07 AM.
12-29-2018, 09:23 AM - 2 Likes   #19
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With modern high-resolution digital camera such as the K-1, the photos often actually contain more details than the human eye can see or remember. I love returning home and then pixel-peeping my way around landscapes, cityscapes, architecture, macro, etc. At home, I have the leisure time and magnification to explore the scene that I did not have (and could not have) while there.

Moreover, the time spent looking at vacation photos (and seeing the best ones on the wall day after day) reinforces the memories, especially the weak ones that tend to fade with time.

It may well be true that the time spent making photos could detract from time in the moment and making memories in the short-term. But the more important fact is that having photos is incredibly useful for having memories in the long-term.

12-29-2018, 09:49 AM - 4 Likes   #20
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It is never a good idea to judge an academic paper based on some random journo's 3 sentence summary which is almost always an oversimplification. Since it has been somewhat misrepresented (and for interest's sake), Henkel's paper that's referenced in the Independent article is here: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Linda_Henkel/publication/259207719_Poin...d8c0205b18.pdf

Relevant to the conservation between Rondec and monochrome about photo albums is a bit from the general discussion of the paper:

"Past work has shown that reviewing photos can provide valuable retrieval cues that reactivate and retain memories for the photographed experiences (e.g., Koutstaal et al., 1998;
Koutstaal et al., 1999), although research has suggested that the sheer volume and lack of organization of digital photos for personal memories discourages many people from accessing and reminiscing about them (Bowen & Petrelli, 2011)."
01-09-2019, 11:51 PM - 1 Like   #21
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Besides having a visual record I can review later, since I'm trying to get a good photo of the subject I spend way more time looking at the subject while composing it than I would normally and I remember it a lot more clearly.
01-10-2019, 06:21 AM - 1 Like   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by pentax360 Quote
Besides having a visual record I can review later, since I'm trying to get a good photo of the subject I spend way more time looking at the subject while composing it than I would normally and I remember it a lot more clearly.
The average phone photographer doesn't realize how much time it takes to set up the angle you want etc.

Last edited by normhead; 01-10-2019 at 06:27 AM.
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