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08-14-2016, 12:37 AM - 1 Like   #1
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[K-S2] How to get a picture of moving object without diplopia or shake?

Yes I'm free enough again to have some tests on my Pentax K-S2 and send out a new question thread at here.

This time I'm seeking for a possible solution for a better experience of recording swift, close objects (cars, people riding bicycles, etc.) without diplopia, a kind of negative visual effect similar to shake that has double or triple, transparent exposure result on the edge with strong contrast. (Or see samples below)

I took part in an alumni activity that's featured with bicycle races, and with the advantage of that claim "Invited Photographer" I did some rough tests. Over 40 pictures about those races were taken, but only 10 to 15 of them satisfied my requirements that the object should be relatively clear and sharp. Results then.

All pictures were taken under Tv mode, shutter speed set to 1/80, ISO 100, with a lens of DAL 18-50.

1.

This picture can be the best in this shooting opportunity. Wires, body, all are really clear and comfortable except imperfect bicycle wheel.

2.

Also good, except ambiguous feet.

But good events can't always take place.

3.

The main object looks vague, maybe out of focus. Sometimes fast focusing can also be worrisome.
Plus, in 100% crop you can see that so-called diplopia:


Parts of all the results are here.

So the question is if there's any way to avoid the negative effect and to get a sharper, clearer record of the object, both from settings, functions to photographer's skills or techniques?

Thanks a lot!


Last edited by FanFanD; 08-14-2016 at 07:59 AM.
08-14-2016, 12:49 AM   #2
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Turn SR off, and ensure that your motion is as smooth as possible while panning. You might even be able to use a shutter speed that's a bit slower, like 1/60s.

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08-14-2016, 04:37 AM   #3
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When you pan the camera the K-S2 senses it and turns SR off automatically. Look in the viewfinding look at the hand symbol and move and once your movement get fast enough the you will see the handsymbol extinguishes.

I would swap iso for a higher shutter speed to sharpen the moving object you are fixed on.
08-14-2016, 05:08 AM - 1 Like   #4
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If you're trying to freeze motion, you need to push your shutter speed up. You should be looking at speeds over 1/320s or 1/500s for bicycles. For cars etc aim for 1/800s to 1/1600s. I suggest you ensure you have an ISO that will allow you to set an aperture of f5.6-f8 or smaller to ensure you get a good depth of field.

Your camera has an AF, AE-L button on the back. I recommend you set this to back button focus as this will help with maintaining focus whilst tracking your subject (panning). AF-C should be used as well as the continuous shooting drive mode. Start off with Continuous Low then change to Continuous High once you are comfortable tracking your subject. Just remember, the more you shoot the quicker you will fill the buffer and you'll have to wait for your camera to write to the card. The slower continuous shooting speed may mean you will miss some shots, so find what works.

With your panning look for a location that will get the sun behind you to illuminate your subject and if possible avoid uneven light in the background so you avoid bright areas in the background drawing the eye and potentially becoming over-exposed.

The inside of a corner is best for following a subject though panning on straights and the outside of a corner will work too. The benefit of being on the inside of a corner is the subject distance is more static for a longer period and challenges the AF less. The AF can be set for centre spot or for the main cross sensors on the centre of the frame. Try both and see what works best for you, remember to keep your subject in the centre of your frame.

As you are using a zoom lens you can be zoomed into the longest focal length as your subject approaches then zoom wider as the subject gets closer. This will allow you to get closer to the action and capture more details. You can of course stay at one focal length too, again give both a try. Try getting low if you can too. A low wide angle image can be a great way to capture a dynamic motion effect. Try this with flash too, just don't ask me about the details as I can't really assist. There is likely to be an answer in here if this is of interest to you: Flashes, Lighting, and Studio - PentaxForums.com

To help the camera focus correctly identify a point on the approach path for your subjects at about 45 degrees from your position. As the subjects approach ensure you've set your focus around this point so focus is close as your subjects enter the zone for capture. If you're talking a bicycle then the entire bike may not be in focus doue to depth of field. This shouldn't be an issue if you've got the correct angle from the front as it's about the person more than the bike. Depth of field is of course less of an issue side on.

The zone for capturing images can end when people are aligned with you or up to about 45 degrees past your point. If there are groups of people select one and keep the AF on them throughout the pan.

As Adam mentioned if you want to try slower shutter speeds to enhance the sense of motion. Here's two examples to compare the effect of fast shutter speed versus slow shutter speed:

1. Motion is frozen at 1/1000s and f6.3

More detail but there's no real sense of motion or speed.

2. Motion is enhanced at 1/100s and f8

There's some blur on the rider in the second image but it better conveys the sense of motion.

If you just want to freeze the subject use a fast shutter speed, tracking is less important but it will help the AF immensely. If you want to capture the sense of motion try and capture some images with slower shutters speeds as well but remember panning with the subject is critical.

My disclaimer: I'm not an expert at this but the above is what I've been practicing, more examples can be found here. https://www.flickr.com/photos/25114742@N07/albums/72157670078512775/page1

Good luck mate,

Tas

08-14-2016, 05:37 AM   #5
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1/1000s, mate. :-)

08-14-2016, 06:42 AM   #6
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When you say 'imperfect wheel' in the first shot, I take that to mean that you would like that to be sharp. Bear in mind that the top and bottom are moving in opposite directions, only the centre is matching your panning, meaning that the wheel will always be as blurred as your background. So you would need a very high shutter speed to freeze eveything in frame, or if you want a motion-blur background you will inevitably have blurred wheels.
08-14-2016, 07:21 AM - 1 Like   #7
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First, to my eye, the focus is OK. Here's a few ideas for dealing with diplopia:

1. More practice panning: Practice taking a sequence of pictures of a moving object where you try to keep some part of the object exactly in the center. Then immediately review your images to see if that part stayed still, moved back-and-forth, or slowly shifted across the frame. Do it again and again and again until the point you picked does not move. One of the beauties of digital photography is that pictures are nearly free. The more you practice, the better.

2. Faster shutter speed: No matter how good you get with panning, the feet of a pedaling cyclist will be blurred because they are moving at a different speed than the body of the cyclist. Tas had good advice on shutter speed.

3. Avoid rough roads -- if the bicycle/vehicle is bouncing up and down on dirt, gravel, rough pavement, then there's not much you can do to avoid diplopia other than stop all motion with a very fast shutter speed.

4. Change your expectations for sharpness: Embrace motion blur by shooting at an even slower shutterspeed and picking those lucky images that have frozen a crucial fraction of the subject (e.g., the rider's face) while most of background, wheel, pedals, etc were in a blur of activity.

Above all, don't be surprised if the "keeper rate" is low (but will get better with time). With all the different motions in the image, the only way to get a sharp photo is a very high shutter speed. But a very high shutter speed can create an uninteresting image because it looks like the subject is stationary. Creating a motion-blurred background without a motion-blurred subject is not always possible.
08-14-2016, 03:01 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by photoptimist Quote
4. Change your expectations for sharpness: Embrace motion blur by shooting at an even slower shutterspeed and picking those lucky images that have frozen a crucial fraction of the subject (e.g., the rider's face) while most of background, wheel, pedals, etc were in a blur of activity.
This is excellent advice.

08-16-2016, 04:34 AM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by Adam Quote
Turn SR off, and ensure that your motion is as smooth as possible while panning. You might even be able to use a shutter speed that's a bit slower, like 1/60s.
QuoteOriginally posted by fb_penpho Quote
When you pan the camera the K-S2 senses it and turns SR off automatically. Look in the viewfinding look at the hand symbol and move and once your movement get fast enough the you will see the handsymbol extinguishes.

I would swap iso for a higher shutter speed to sharpen the moving object you are fixed on.
@Adam @fb_penpho: Got it. I just checked those photos, and I found the sharp photo was taken with SR off while the blurred one wasn't. That can be a factor.

QuoteOriginally posted by clackers Quote
1/1000s, mate. :-)
@clackers: In fact I prefer a picture with motion blur on the background So I think slow shutter speed is a necessity.

QuoteOriginally posted by victormeldrew Quote
When you say 'imperfect wheel' in the first shot, I take that to mean that you would like that to be sharp. Bear in mind that the top and bottom are moving in opposite directions, only the centre is matching your panning, meaning that the wheel will always be as blurred as your background. So you would need a very high shutter speed to freeze eveything in frame, or if you want a motion-blur background you will inevitably have blurred wheels.
@victormeldrew: Owe to my poor english! Indeed I'm talking about a "cropped" wheel for the ignorance of moving down my camera. The blurred wheel is exactly what I really want.

QuoteOriginally posted by photoptimist Quote
First, to my eye, the focus is OK. Here's a few ideas for dealing with diplopia:

1. More practice panning: Practice taking a sequence of pictures of a moving object where you try to keep some part of the object exactly in the center. Then immediately review your images to see if that part stayed still, moved back-and-forth, or slowly shifted across the frame. Do it again and again and again until the point you picked does not move. One of the beauties of digital photography is that pictures are nearly free. The more you practice, the better.

2. Faster shutter speed: No matter how good you get with panning, the feet of a pedaling cyclist will be blurred because they are moving at a different speed than the body of the cyclist. Tas had good advice on shutter speed.

3. Avoid rough roads -- if the bicycle/vehicle is bouncing up and down on dirt, gravel, rough pavement, then there's not much you can do to avoid diplopia other than stop all motion with a very fast shutter speed.

4. Change your expectations for sharpness: Embrace motion blur by shooting at an even slower shutterspeed and picking those lucky images that have frozen a crucial fraction of the subject (e.g., the rider's face) while most of background, wheel, pedals, etc were in a blur of activity.

Above all, don't be surprised if the "keeper rate" is low (but will get better with time). With all the different motions in the image, the only way to get a sharp photo is a very high shutter speed. But a very high shutter speed can create an uninteresting image because it looks like the subject is stationary. Creating a motion-blurred background without a motion-blurred subject is not always possible.
@photoptimist: Thanks! I may still lack enough practice about panning. Will take your advice and do more exercise.

QuoteOriginally posted by Tas Quote
If you're trying to freeze motion, you need to push your shutter speed up. You should be looking at speeds over 1/320s or 1/500s for bicycles. For cars etc aim for 1/800s to 1/1600s. I suggest you ensure you have an ISO that will allow you to set an aperture of f5.6-f8 or smaller to ensure you get a good depth of field.

Your camera has an AF, AE-L button on the back. I recommend you set this to back button focus as this will help with maintaining focus whilst tracking your subject (panning). AF-C should be used as well as the continuous shooting drive mode. Start off with Continuous Low then change to Continuous High once you are comfortable tracking your subject. Just remember, the more you shoot the quicker you will fill the buffer and you'll have to wait for your camera to write to the card. The slower continuous shooting speed may mean you will miss some shots, so find what works.

With your panning look for a location that will get the sun behind you to illuminate your subject and if possible avoid uneven light in the background so you avoid bright areas in the background drawing the eye and potentially becoming over-exposed.

The inside of a corner is best for following a subject though panning on straights and the outside of a corner will work too. The benefit of being on the inside of a corner is the subject distance is more static for a longer period and challenges the AF less. The AF can be set for centre spot or for the main cross sensors on the centre of the frame. Try both and see what works best for you, remember to keep your subject in the centre of your frame.

As you are using a zoom lens you can be zoomed into the longest focal length as your subject approaches then zoom wider as the subject gets closer. This will allow you to get closer to the action and capture more details. You can of course stay at one focal length too, again give both a try. Try getting low if you can too. A low wide angle image can be a great way to capture a dynamic motion effect. Try this with flash too, just don't ask me about the details as I can't really assist. There is likely to be an answer in here if this is of interest to you: Flashes, Lighting, and Studio - PentaxForums.com

To help the camera focus correctly identify a point on the approach path for your subjects at about 45 degrees from your position. As the subjects approach ensure you've set your focus around this point so focus is close as your subjects enter the zone for capture. If you're talking a bicycle then the entire bike may not be in focus doue to depth of field. This shouldn't be an issue if you've got the correct angle from the front as it's about the person more than the bike. Depth of field is of course less of an issue side on.

The zone for capturing images can end when people are aligned with you or up to about 45 degrees past your point. If there are groups of people select one and keep the AF on them throughout the pan.

As Adam mentioned if you want to try slower shutter speeds to enhance the sense of motion. Here's two examples to compare the effect of fast shutter speed versus slow shutter speed:

1. Motion is frozen at 1/1000s and f6.3

More detail but there's no real sense of motion or speed.

2. Motion is enhanced at 1/100s and f8

There's some blur on the rider in the second image but it better conveys the sense of motion.

If you just want to freeze the subject use a fast shutter speed, tracking is less important but it will help the AF immensely. If you want to capture the sense of motion try and capture some images with slower shutters speeds as well but remember panning with the subject is critical.

My disclaimer: I'm not an expert at this but the above is what I've been practicing, more examples can be found here. https://www.flickr.com/photos/25114742@N07/albums/72157670078512775/page1

Good luck mate,

Tas
@Tas: Your Flickr photos are really impressive! AF-C and focusing point expansion are also used in the shooting.
One thing I'm wondering: How can you make the subject really sharp without shake or diplopia? For example, the cyclist on the photo titled "Orange is indeed the new black" is pretty sharp, even with his hair line clear to draw out. Could you please tell me how can you do this and EXIF of the photo? Thanks!
08-16-2016, 04:57 PM - 1 Like   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by FanFanD Quote
@Tas: Your Flickr photos are really impressive! AF-C and focusing point expansion are also used in the shooting. One thing I'm wondering: How can you make the subject really sharp without shake or diplopia? For example, the cyclist on the photo titled "Orange is indeed the new black" is pretty sharp, even with his hair line clear to draw out. Could you please tell me how can you do this and EXIF of the photo? Thanks!
Ta for the positive feedback.

To explain a bit about the Orange is the new Black image I will provide some context; I'd bought the K-1 four days earlier, was testing the smc DA 70 LTD on the K-1 and wanted to practice following motion using a slow shutter speed to enhance the motion effect. So I went out one morning and found a couple of spots to practice tracking subjects and learning what the AF and the K-1/lens combo would do.

The subject image was in a heavily shaded location and subjects within 2-5m of me as I was panning. This was the second spot I'd set up in and found that the proximity of the subjects, late acquistion of the subject due to location, shaded area, my unfamiliarity with the set up all conspired to drop my keeper rate. I did learn a bit from the experience and suggest that when shooting slower shutter speeds the shorter distance to your subject can increase the difficulty in successful capture. Not impossible, just less consistency of successful captures.

Back to the subject image. I will post an export of the image from LR6 so you can see the EXIF. I will post a heavily cropped version of that same image so you can see the double vision effect (diplopia) is present as the person is in motion though in post I choose to apply sharpening etc only to those locations that enhance the image, not detract from it. This image was one of six in sequence and was the best of the lot as I didn't pan with the subject that well. The bike is in focus as are important details about the rider though there is some blur in the helmet. The helmet was important as was the face and torso so these are areas of the image to have sharp and with sufficient contrast/colour and luminance to make the image okay. Take note of the similarities between your first image and this one as there are many similarities.

To highlight the tracking of the subject better, in the final image there are two subjects in the same frame. I tracked with the closest rider and he's sharp but despite the close proximity of the second rider he is blurred due to the 1/25s shutter speed and that small variance in his speed compared to my tracking of the front rider.

So as stated by the other forum members above, fast shutter speed is good for freezing motion but to get sharp images with a slow shutter speed you need to track your target and look at sharpness in the image differently.

Good luck with it all and don't forget to post how it goes including some images.

Tas
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Last edited by Tas; 08-16-2016 at 05:04 PM.
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