Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
09-13-2016, 10:15 AM   #1
Junior Member
STEEWPHOTOGRAPHY's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 49
Problem with K-S1

Hey Guys,

well since 3 days I have a problem with Pentax K-S1. It seems like all pictures are blurry and I don't know why!

Here is some of my footage from today.





I got also three little points on my images and my lenses and sensor are clean ....

I hope someone can help my :c

09-13-2016, 10:23 AM   #2
Moderator
Loyal Site Supporter
BigMackCam's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: North East of England
Posts: 5,570
That doesn't look blurry - it looks like you're shooting with high ISO settings (hence the graininess in both photos, and in the top one, random colour noise too). What ISO were you shooting at in both photos?

Regarding the sensor "dots", the sensor can look clean to the naked eye, but still have dust particles on it. Do you own a bulb-blower? (don't do anything with it yet if you do, just let us know either way!)
09-13-2016, 10:28 AM   #3
Junior Member
STEEWPHOTOGRAPHY's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 49
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
That doesn't look blurry - it looks like you're shooting with high ISO settings (hence the graininess in both photos, and in the top one, random colour noise too). What ISO were you shooting at in both photos?

Regarding the sensor "dots", the sensor can look clean to the naked eye, but still have dust particles on it. Do you own a bulb-blower? (don't do anything with it yet if you do, just let us know either way!)
I think I shot with 1600 on ISO.No I don't have a bulb-blower.
09-13-2016, 10:32 AM   #4
Veteran Member




Join Date: May 2015
Location: New Orleans
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 302
On my phone i can't tell. Check if shake reduction is on. To see if sensor is clean take a picture of a white wall or sheet of paper at f22. All dust shows clearly.

09-13-2016, 10:41 AM   #5
Moderator
Loyal Site Supporter
BigMackCam's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: North East of England
Posts: 5,570
QuoteOriginally posted by STEEWPHOTOGRAPHY Quote
I think I shot with 1600 on ISO.No I don't have a bulb-blower.
OK. I'd have guessed 3200 looking at that first one, because of the colour noise, but I can believe 1600. I'd have guessed 800 or so on the second, as I don't really see any colour noise.

Is there a good reason why you're shooting at such a high ISO setting? I assume it's because you used a very high shutter speed and/or a very small aperture (you definitely used a small aperture - f/16, f/22 or thereabouts, because you wouldn't see the sensor dust this way with a wide aperture). My question then would be, why did you need those settings? These are daylight photos with not much movement (save for the speedboat in the second photo), so you wouldn't need particularly high shutter speeds. Plus, considering the subject matter, I see nothing that would require an aperture smaller than f/8; in fact, you could go for a much bigger aperture (smaller f-number - eg. f/4 or f/5.6) on the bird photo...

Let's sort this high ISO issue out first, then talk about the sensor dust afterwards

Last edited by BigMackCam; 09-13-2016 at 11:41 AM.
09-13-2016, 10:47 AM   #6
Junior Member
STEEWPHOTOGRAPHY's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 49
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
OK. I'd have guessed 3200 looking at that first one, because of the colour noise, but I can believe 1600. I'd have guessed 800 or so on the second, as I don't really see any colour noise.

Is there a good reason why you're shooting at such a high ISO setting? I assume it's because you used a very high shutter speed and/or a very small aperture 9 (you definitely used a small aperture - f/16, f/22 or thereabouts, because you wouldn't see the sensor dust this way with a wide aperture). My question then would be, why did you need those settings? These are daylight photos with not much movement (save for the speedboat in the second photo), so you wouldn't need particularly high shutter speeds. Plus, considering the subject matter, I see nothing that would require an aperture smaller than f/8; in fact, you could go for a much bigger aperture (smaller f-number - eg. f/4 or f/5.6) on the bird photo...

Let's sort this high ISO issue out first, then talk about the sensor dust afterwards
Typical newbie failure I did then I heard somewhere that you should take photos with a higher ISO because of editing it ? Well I will try out a lower ISO thank you for your help.

Well to the dust.I searched for a bulb-blower. Is a cheap one enough ? and what do I have to note ?
09-13-2016, 10:47 AM   #7
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Slovenia
Posts: 2,141
The spots are probably just dust on the lens showing up because of the insane aperture settings. This would also explain the softnesss you're seeing - when you close down the aperture the image gets progressively softer (diffraction).
Regarding ISO settings, it's best to keep it low - you probably got the advice of "better to use a higher ISO to have a sharp but noisy image" which is correct, but totally unnecessary in daylight
09-13-2016, 10:49 AM   #8
Junior Member
STEEWPHOTOGRAPHY's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 49
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Giklab Quote
The spots are probably just dust on the lens showing up because of the insane aperture settings. This would also explain the softnesss you're seeing - when you close down the aperture the image gets progressively softer (diffraction).
Regarding ISO settings, it's best to keep it low - you probably got the advice of "better to use a higher ISO to have a sharp but noisy image" which is correct, but totally unnecessary in daylight
well my lenses are clean. and I have it with both of my lenses.

09-13-2016, 10:56 AM   #9
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Slovenia
Posts: 2,141
QuoteOriginally posted by STEEWPHOTOGRAPHY Quote
well my lenses are clean. and I have it with both of my lenses.
Definitely the sensor then. I just mentioned it because you usually start seeing spots that are at the *back* of the lens at such apertures.
I use a cheap blower and it works fine, not sure about the differences vs more expensive models. I suggest facing the camera mount downwards when cleaning like this so any particles fall straight out and don't merely get blown around.
09-13-2016, 10:58 AM   #10
Moderator
Loyal Site Supporter
BigMackCam's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: North East of England
Posts: 5,570
QuoteOriginally posted by STEEWPHOTOGRAPHY Quote
Typical newbie failure I did then I heard somewhere that you should take photos with a higher ISO because of editing it ? Well I will try out a lower ISO thank you for your help.
No worries, it's a learning process

It's usually best to shoot at the lowest ISO setting you can to support the shutter speed and aperture settings you want to use.

For the vast majority of day-to-day photography, you won't need an aperture smaller than f/16, and in most cases I would say no smaller than f/8. At these apertures you will be letting in much more light than a very small aperture such as f/22, so you won't need to use such a high ISO setting. Furthermore, as you set your aperture smaller and smaller (larger f-numbers), the detail in the image will actually soften due to something called diffraction.

An additional benefit of shooting at apertures of f/8 or wider (f/2.8, f/4, f/5.6 etc.) is that you won't see those dust spots on your sensor. These only become visible at very small aperture settings.

Can I recommend that you read, re-read and read yet again this article: Camera Exposure: Aperture, ISO & Shutter Speed

That will give you a good baseline understanding of exposure, and with that knowledge you'll have so much control over your photography, as well as an understanding of why certain things happen or look the way they do in your photographs.

QuoteOriginally posted by STEEWPHOTOGRAPHY Quote
Well to the dust.I searched for a bulb-blower. Is a cheap one enough ? and what do I have to note ?
I don't recommend really cheap blowers, simply because the materials and the manufacturing processes can be such that you have debris inside them. If you then use one to blow dust off your sensor, you can blow more onto it than was there in the first place. For now, I'd suggest you try shooting at apertures larger than f/16 (smaller f-numbers - f/2.8, f/4, f/5.6, f/8). You won't see the dust.
09-13-2016, 11:01 AM   #11
Junior Member
STEEWPHOTOGRAPHY's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 49
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
No worries, it's a learning process

It's usually best to shoot at the lowest ISO setting you can to support the shutter speed and aperture settings you want to use.

For the vast majority of day-to-day photography, you won't need an aperture smaller than f/16, and in most cases I would say no smaller than f/8. At these apertures you will be letting in much more light than a very small aperture such as f/22, so you won't need to use such a high ISO setting. Furthermore, as you set your aperture smaller and smaller (larger f-numbers), the detail in the image will actually soften due to something called diffraction.

An additional benefit of shooting at apertures of f/8 or wider (f/2.8, f/4, f/5.6 etc.) is that you won't see those dust spots on your sensor. These only become visible at very small aperture settings.

Can I recommend that you read, re-read and read yet again this article: Camera Exposure: Aperture, ISO & Shutter Speed

That will give you a good baseline understanding of exposure, and with that knowledge you'll have so much control over your photography, as well as an understanding of why certain things happen or look the way they do in your photographs.



I don't recommend really cheap blowers, simply because the materials and the manufacturing processes can be such that you have debris inside them. If you then use one to blow dust off your sensor, you can blow more onto it than was there in the first place. For now, I'd suggest you try shooting at apertures larger than f/16 (smaller f-numbers - f/2.8, f/4, f/5.6, f/8). You won't see the dust.
Thx I will definitely read the article
09-13-2016, 11:38 AM   #12
Loyal Site Supporter
UncleVanya's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2014
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 9,554
I will say that anyone who thinks dust will not show up at f/8 is not accurate. I rarely shoot over f/8 and I have shots a plenty that showed dust at that level. However at f/2 - probably not.

Also to clarify aperture is a bit of a curve. Wide open (lowest number on your lens) is softer than stopped down a little. So the lens gets sharper and has more Depth of Field (area front to back in focus) as you stop down - UNTIL diffraction starts to eat away at sharpness. Diffraction onset varies a bit and while I won't get technical here it can be assumed that around f/11 on any Pentax DSLR other than the K-1 that this starts to become an issue. The effects of Diffraction will vary in terms of tolerance and if you print vs. view on screen. So for maximum sharpness typically you want f/5.6-f/8 or so with most lens/camera combos in the Pentax world unless you are on Full Frame K-1 and then the numbers go up a little.
09-13-2016, 11:47 AM   #13
Moderator
Loyal Site Supporter
BigMackCam's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: North East of England
Posts: 5,570
QuoteOriginally posted by UncleVanya Quote
I will say that anyone who thinks dust will not show up at f/8 is not accurate. I rarely shoot over f/8 and I have shots a plenty that showed dust at that level. However at f/2 - probably not.
Interesting. I've never seen anything significant at f/8 - yet plenty at, for instance f/16. One thing is certain - the effect of sensor dust at f/8 is *way* less than at much smaller apertures, and I'd like to bet the OP won't notice these dust spots at f/8. It's possible, but not likely...
09-13-2016, 12:18 PM   #14
Loyal Site Supporter
UncleVanya's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2014
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 9,554
QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
Interesting. I've never seen anything significant at f/8 - yet plenty at, for instance f/16. One thing is certain - the effect of sensor dust at f/8 is *way* less than at much smaller apertures, and I'd like to bet the OP won't notice these dust spots at f/8. It's possible, but not likely...
Several of my single in shots have been called out over the past couple of years for spots in the sky... none were over f/8.
But I may have had dust wagons rather than bunnies...LOL.
09-13-2016, 12:32 PM - 1 Like   #15
Moderator
Loyal Site Supporter
BigMackCam's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: North East of England
Posts: 5,570
QuoteOriginally posted by UncleVanya Quote
Several of my single in shots have been called out over the past couple of years for spots in the sky... none were over f/8.
But I may have had dust wagons rather than bunnies...LOL.
He he Yeah, I guess that's where they'll be noticed most... I took a bunch of shots whilst on holiday a few months back, and in fact there were a couple at f/8 where I could *just* make out a couple of smudge circles in the cloudless sky. It took me a couple of weeks to see them - they were barely perceptible... until I noticed them, and then that's *all* I could see

This is simply God's way of telling us we all need really fast lenses
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
bathtub, blow, bulk, children, guys, k-s1, k-s2, method, perfectly, toys
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fun with the K-S1 mtngal Pentax K-S1 & K-S2 256 4 Days Ago 06:06 PM
Hi new OZZY member with a K-S1 FLOSSEY Welcomes and Introductions 8 08-04-2016 12:29 AM
K-S1 problem Barso Pentax K-S1 & K-S2 13 04-24-2016 04:17 AM
Need help with old lenses for new K-S1 ccarlitos2 Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 2 12-29-2015 08:10 PM
Help with a K-S1 Copey Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 17 05-26-2015 02:56 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:36 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top