Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
04-15-2018, 03:56 PM   #1
Junior Member




Join Date: Feb 2018
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 31
F 80-200 fix. Is it worth it?

I'm curious what you all think about this:

At an antique shop near me for $12 they have an F 80-200 1:4.7-5.6. The catch is it's beyond fungused up, and the filter ring is dented in other than that the glass looks to be in decent shape. I wish I had pictures to show the extent of the damage. It zooms in/out fairly nicely, but not all the way because of the damage. Honestly, I need another lens like I need a hole in my head, but because I get bored and like working on things I've been considering taking on this project.

Does anyone have any experience with taking the F-series lenses apart to de-fungus, and what are the odds I could get that barrel straightened out?

04-15-2018, 04:10 PM   #2
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
jatrax's Avatar

Join Date: May 2010
Location: Oregon Cascades
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 11,595
It's not a particularly good lens to start with. $12 is not much if you want a project but IMHO you will put in a good amount of work and get nothing for it. You cannot save them all.....................
04-15-2018, 04:17 PM   #3
Senior Moderator
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
BigMackCam's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Durham, England
Posts: 9,112
To me, that's a parts lens only, or perhaps an inexpensive opportunity to work on a lens and learn, without the stress involved in potentially wrecking something more valuable. I'd probably buy it for that reason alone, and see it as a cheap gift to myself with potentially big benefits (knowledge-wise) - but with zero expectation of ending up with a great piece of glass at the end of it
04-15-2018, 06:08 PM   #4
Pentaxian
Just1MoreDave's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Aurora, CO
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 5,101
The A version front elements are in a plastic carrier that unscrews using the filter threads. (Based on a 12 year old memory.) The filter threads just extend further in the barrel than usual. If the F is like that, you probably can't get to the front elements without fixing the threads. I didn't like the lens a lot but I've read posts by others who really liked the F version.

04-15-2018, 10:41 PM   #5
Junior Member




Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 28
I have a copy and I'm very happy with it. I wouldn't personally bother buying a damaged example though as mint examples can be picked up for next to nothing (mine had some fungus but is otherwise mechanically sound and I got it for the price of postage only).

Dave's comment above is correct: the front group is mounted in a plastic holder and threaded in: you'd have to fix the filter threads before removing it. The threads on this lens are plastic and might crack if you try to straighten them.

Damage to the filter threads shouldn't affect the zoom action either. This lens has an internal zoom mechanism so if the lens won't zoom fully then it suggests further internal damage.
04-16-2018, 12:27 AM - 1 Like   #6
Senior Member




Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bangalore
Photos: Albums
Posts: 176
You can spend that 12 dollars by buying a good photography book than that worthless piece of junk. Even if it could be cleaned effortlessly that's not a good lens at all. It might only satisfy that you can reach 300 without spending much.
04-16-2018, 02:44 AM   #7
Junior Member




Join Date: Feb 2018
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 31
Original Poster
Damn, some of y'all are vicious. I've been researching on how to open a lens and de-fungus, but that rough zooming and bent section does have me worried. I just wanted to be able to take pride in something I basically took from junk and fixed, but it definitely sounds like there's no fixing that lens.
04-16-2018, 03:27 AM - 1 Like   #8
Senior Moderator
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
BigMackCam's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Durham, England
Posts: 9,112
QuoteOriginally posted by bikehead90 Quote
Damn, some of y'all are vicious.
LOL I'm sure everyone means well. We have your interests at heart

QuoteOriginally posted by bikehead90 Quote
I just wanted to be able to take pride in something I basically took from junk and fixed, but it definitely sounds like there's no fixing that lens.
I completely understand the desire to restore a lens to working condition, and the pride in doing so.

Can I ask, have you serviced and repaired lenses before? If not, my suggestion would be to start with a simple manual focus prime (something like an Industar-50-2, or a Helios-44-2 if you're feeling a bit more adventurous). That would give you the opportunity to work on optical elements, diaphragm and focusing helicoid - all of which require individual skills and tricks that are transferrable to more complicated lenses.

04-16-2018, 07:41 AM   #9
Journeyman Cat Wrangler
Loyal Site Supporter
SSGGeezer's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Maine, U.S.
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 2,216
QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
LOL I'm sure everyone means well. We have your interests at heart



I completely understand the desire to restore a lens to working condition, and the pride in doing so.

Can I ask, have you serviced and repaired lenses before? If not, my suggestion would be to start with a simple manual focus prime (something like an Industar-50-2, or a Helios-44-2 if you're feeling a bit more adventurous). That would give you the opportunity to work on optical elements, diaphragm and focusing helicoid - all of which require individual skills and tricks that are transferrable to more complicated lenses.
I have no desire to ever open up one of my lenses but Mike has posted some interesting images when he cleans up his Soviet imports and those seem like something inexpensive (mostly,) to practice on. Going straight to a zoom that has more than one problem just seems like a recipe for disappointment.
04-16-2018, 08:08 AM   #10
Veteran Member




Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: 12822
Photos: Albums
Posts: 445
i think it would be worth it as parts only,
Pins, metal mount, springs, possibly aperture parts and screw drive bits.
other then that, nope.

i would show them that it's pretty much useless S is and offer 5 bucks for it.
04-16-2018, 08:16 AM   #11
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
jatrax's Avatar

Join Date: May 2010
Location: Oregon Cascades
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 11,595
QuoteOriginally posted by bikehead90 Quote
Damn, some of y'all are vicious.
Not vicious, just realistic. I've bought and repaired / cleaned quite a few lenses over the years and sometimes it is really worth the effort. but you have to compare several things:
1) how good / rare / desirable is the lens?
2) what is the cost of good condition one that requires no repair?
3) what is your skill level and chance of success?

In this case unless you want a throw away lens to learn repair or disassembly on I see no upside.
1) it is not good, rare or desirable
2) ebay lists many of these at $75 - 100, not cheap but still not an expensive lens
3) it has several different issues, not a simple single fix
04-17-2018, 03:53 PM - 1 Like   #12
Junior Member




Join Date: Feb 2018
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 31
Original Poster
Thanks for the input, everyone. I'll try to find something a little easier to work on BigMackCam's got it right.
QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
Can I ask, have you serviced and repaired lenses before?
I have not done this kind of work before. However I take apart my video game consoles to fix them. You don't know what frustration is until you've tried to service a Famicom Disk System disk drive. So, I think I'll pass on this lens, and find something cheaper. I liked SSGGeezer's idea of old Soviet glass. Been looking at those and I definitely think their qualities are pretty cool, and they're cheap (A plus!).
04-17-2018, 04:02 PM   #13
Senior Moderator
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
BigMackCam's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Durham, England
Posts: 9,112
QuoteOriginally posted by bikehead90 Quote
I have not done this kind of work before. However I take apart my video game consoles to fix them. You don't know what frustration is until you've tried to service a Famicom Disk System disk drive.
LOL I can only imagine

It sounds like you're probably cut out for lens work, though, if you have the patience for that kind of thing.

Old Soviet lenses are a great way to begin... Depending on the models you pick, they can be cheap, most are readily serviceable, and you end up with a really nice and fun piece of vintage glass at the end of your efforts (or, if you screw it up, some useful spares for the next attempt ).

The next step (other than picking a suitable lens) is to make sure you have the basic tools, materials and potions
04-17-2018, 04:10 PM   #14
Junior Member




Join Date: Feb 2018
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 31
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
LOL I can only imagine

It sounds like you're probably cut out for lens work, though, if you have the patience for that kind of thing.

Old Soviet lenses are a great way to begin... Depending on the models you pick, they can be cheap, most are readily serviceable, and you end up with a really nice and fun piece of vintage glass at the end of your efforts (or, if you screw it up, some useful spares for the next attempt ).

The next step (other than picking a suitable lens) is to make sure you have the basic tools, materials and potions
I have a set of high-precision screwdrivers with basically every bit you'd ever need, but are there any other tools I should have before tackling a project like that?

Any specific lenses to look for? I recently got the FA 50mm 1.4 and the F 50mm 1.7 and my girlfriend's ready to kill me if I make another camera purchase, so it'll probably be awhile before I get them.
04-17-2018, 04:29 PM   #15
Senior Moderator
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
BigMackCam's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Durham, England
Posts: 9,112
QuoteOriginally posted by bikehead90 Quote
I have a set of high-precision screwdrivers with basically every bit you'd ever need, but are there any other tools I should have before tackling a project like that?
I assume you're talking about something like the iFixIt kit of screwdrivers... Either way, depending on the lenses you're looking to service, it's worth having a range of small sized flat-head, Phillips and JIS (Japenese standard) cross-head screwdrivers to cover your requirements (don't use Phillips screwdrivers with Japanese lenses as a general rule - you need to use JIS screwdrivers for most of those).

Other tools? It depends on how well-prepared you want to be and how much of an appetite you have for (1) innovating with what you have lying around, and (2) making costly mistakes that you'll wish you hadn't

My own lens servicing tools include the following:

- range of screwdrivers (as detailed above)
- good worklight (something you can position and direct towards you working area)
- lens wrench (for removing lens element retaining rings - you can also use some calipers for this)
- sucker tool for removing lens elements
- rubber lens ring removal tools in various sizes (and some non-slip rubber material that you can cut to shape)
- tweezers (I have two sets - flat ended, and pointed / angled)
- bulb dust blower
- magnifying glass or eyepiece
- lens cleaning papers
- lens cleaning fluid
- wet lens wipes
- focusing helicoid lubricant (I use Helimax XP now, but white lithium zinc oxide marine grease is a good substitute - if a little heavy)
- isopropyl alcohol
- washing-up liquid
- white vinegar
- cold cream (yes, really)
- some plastic trays or tubs to hold components that you remove - set screws, springs etc.

I'm sure I've forgotten a few things, but that's a pretty good list. You'll probably end up adding to it over time, but this is a pretty good setup for most situations

QuoteOriginally posted by bikehead90 Quote
Any specific lenses to look for? I recently got the FA 50mm 1.4 and the F 50mm 1.7 and my girlfriend's ready to kill me if I make another camera purchase, so it'll probably be awhile before I get them.
I would really recommend starting with the simplest possible lens. My interest is primarily vintage Soviet lenses, and a great model to begin with is an M42-mount Industar-50-2. It doesn't get any simpler, really, and all the learned skills are transferrable. Or, you could pick any of the Helios-44x models (44-2, 44M, 44M-3/4/5/6/7). Alternatively, some of the Carl Zeiss Jena M42 primes are also good starting points. There are plenty of others... Just pick simple manual-focus primes, ideally manual or preset aperture, but auto-aperture models are fine too.

Last edited by BigMackCam; 04-17-2018 at 04:35 PM.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
damage, pentax service, repair, service, warranty
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
For Sale - Sold: K10D+grip, DA12-24mm,14mm 2.8, 75-200 f3.8, 28-200, 70-300, 80-200 f4.7-5.6 igowerf Sold Items 2 02-07-2018 08:33 PM
DA* 50-135-- to fix or not to fix, that is the question... geek-girl Repairs and Warranty Service 9 10-03-2017 03:07 PM
For Sale - Sold: M 50/f1.4, Takumar 135/f2.5, Super Tak 28/f3.5, Tokina 80-200/f2.8, M 80-200/f loudbay Sold Items 11 03-07-2008 04:53 PM
Opinion please - Tokina ATX 80-200 or Tamron SP 80-200? afs760bf Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 9 02-25-2008 06:37 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:53 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top