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02-18-2016, 05:57 AM   #1
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Question about 5-axis Stabilization possibility

Since I see this tech on the Olympus camera I wonder if is possible to control the depth of field like a Tilt Shift lens using one of the new axis of movements.
Anybody knows?

02-18-2016, 06:44 AM   #2
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No, the sensor still moves in the same 3 axis as before. Up/down, left/right and rotating.
The difference is new motion sensors that detect up/down and left/right movement of the camera, but no difference in sensor movements.

Just as before the sensor can be moved for shift, but that will not help you control depth of field.
02-18-2016, 07:15 AM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by Fogel70 Quote
No, the sensor still moves in the same 3 axis as before. Up/down, left/right and rotating.
The difference is new motion sensors that detect up/down and left/right movement of the camera, but no difference in sensor movements.

Just as before the sensor can be moved for shift, but that will not help you control depth of field.
What are the other three directions it detects?
02-18-2016, 08:04 AM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by Fogel70 Quote
No, the sensor still moves in the same 3 axis as before. Up/down, left/right and rotating.
The difference is new motion sensors that detect up/down and left/right movement of the camera, but no difference in sensor movements.

Just as before the sensor can be moved for shift, but that will not help you control depth of field.
Are you sure? The 5-Axis stabilization diagrams like the sony (see attached) show new axis of movements, Yaw and Pitch. As far as I know this are the axis used by the Tilt Shift lens to control depth of field, so I don't see why is not possible to used this axis to simulate this kind of lens.

Attached Images
 
02-18-2016, 08:19 AM   #5
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Yes, the sensor stays on its same flat plane as before, just as other 5-axis systems do. It wouldn't make sense to actually tilt the sensor off its plane unless the lens was also tilting out of its mount, which of course it never is on a normal lens. The 5 it is referring to are the movements it is detecting that need to be compensated for, not the movements it makes to do so. Previously it only detected rotational movements of the camera (which cause the biggest shifts) -- roll, pitch, and yaw. So by adding x & y (up/down & left/right) it will be better at stabilizing at macro distances where those really make a difference, and I guess slightly better overall. (Macro will still be affected by slight fore-aft movements.)
02-18-2016, 09:24 AM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by vonBaloney Quote
Yes, the sensor stays on its same flat plane as before, just as other 5-axis systems do. It wouldn't make sense to actually tilt the sensor off its plane unless the lens was also tilting out of its mount, which of course it never is on a normal lens. The 5 it is referring to are the movements it is detecting that need to be compensated for, not the movements it makes to do so. Previously it only detected rotational movements of the camera (which cause the biggest shifts) -- roll, pitch, and yaw. So by adding x & y (up/down & left/right) it will be better at stabilizing at macro distances where those really make a difference, and I guess slightly better overall. (Macro will still be affected by slight fore-aft movements.)
Looks like it does to me. Check the SR description Features2 | PENTAX K-1 | RICOH IMAGING

John.
02-18-2016, 09:47 AM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by jhmos Quote
Looks like it does to me. Check the SR description Features2 | PENTAX K-1 | RICOH IMAGING
Looks like it does what? Yes it compensates for camera movements along 5 axes, and it achieves that compensation by moving the sensor along 3 axes. Think about it for a minute and you'll see why it must be that way. Any tilting or fore-aft movement of the sensor would not compensate for anything, but totally destroy the image.
02-19-2016, 07:34 AM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by Fogel70 Quote
The difference is new motion sensors that detect up/down and left/right movement of the camera, but no difference in sensor movements.
Yes, and IIRC, you pointed out a while ago that the camera would need information about the subject distance to optimally correct for translational movement.

I first wondered why Pentax did not make any restriction to lens types (regarding the efficacy of translational compensation, in particular for macro shots), i.e., to those that support good information about subject distance, and then it occurred to me that they might be using the metering chip to infer the magnification of the lens (comparing the movement of the image with the sensed acceleration).

This implementation would also explain the remark by Pentax that the translational compensation does not work when one uses LiveView.

04-04-2016, 03:01 PM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by vonBaloney Quote
Looks like it does what? Yes it compensates for camera movements along 5 axes, and it achieves that compensation by moving the sensor along 3 axes. Think about it for a minute and you'll see why it must be that way. Any tilting or fore-aft movement of the sensor would not compensate for anything, but totally destroy the image.
I think what was being referred to may have been the video at that link (Features2 | PENTAX K-1 | RICOH IMAGING) which actually shows the sensor being stabilized to resist those five axes of camera motion -- ie. it actually does show the camera being rotated with respect to the sensor for the pitch and yaw motions!

This is almost certainly a misleading video and not reflective of the actual degrees of freedom of the sensor SR motion, since as you implied such pitch/yaw sensor rotation would tilt much of the sensor out of the imaging plane and really ruin the focus (unless you were going for that effect, a la the OP's feature question). It's a shame that the feature specifications do not explain how the SR II system works more clearly, to avoid such confusion.
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