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04-19-2016, 02:55 PM   #1
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Pentax K1 and SMC Lenses.

I am now waiting delivery of my Pentax k1.
Can anyone tell me what to expect by using 35mm SMC lenses
and also my Pentax 6x7 lenses, I have the adaptor.

04-19-2016, 03:08 PM - 1 Like   #2
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QuoteOriginally posted by Dobson Quote
Can anyone tell me what to expect by using 35mm SMC lenses
Are you talking about film-era lenses? They will work just fine. The image quality might be a bit behind modern lenses, but you should still be able to get great results.

M & K series lenses will require stop-down metering since the K-1 doesn't have the aperture coupler. The same goes for adapted 6x7 lenses, though personally I'd only bother adapting telephotos, as normal 6x7 lenses end up being way too bulky with the adapter.

A lenses and newer will work without limitations in terms of metering and focusing.

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04-19-2016, 07:19 PM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by Adam Quote
normal 6x7 lenses end up being way too bulky with the adapter
I'm tempted to get an adapter to mount my 67 55-100, LOL.
04-19-2016, 08:08 PM - 4 Likes   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by Adam Quote
The image quality might be a bit behind modern lenses, but you should still be able to get great results.
I am really interested to see if this is in fact the case. For instance, I will be very keen to compare the FA31, K28/2, A28/2 and K30/2.8 on full frame. I won't be limited to sharpness as my only measure.

Perhaps this topic might warrant a contest or at least a blind poll. People can submit photographs taken of the same scene with the same settings with two different lenses (e.g. FA31 and K28/2), crop to make equivolent then ask PF member to vote for the best image WITHOUT anyone knowing which lens was used.

The nifty 50's would be a prime candidate for such a blind poll, with ST50/1.4 all the way through to the FA50/1.4

04-20-2016, 05:47 AM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by Adam Quote
Are you talking about film-era lenses? They will work just fine. The image quality might be a bit behind modern lenses, but .....
Personally I do love the old SMC lenses. BUT... a lot of CA, really too much. May be I do something wrong. On my K-3 I haven't done too much.
04-20-2016, 12:12 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by HYS Quote
Personally I do love the old SMC lenses. BUT... a lot of CA, really too much. May be I do something wrong. On my K-3 I haven't done too much.
I'd say that this is the area in which modern lenses have seen the greatest improvement compared to older ones. Old lenses are sharp, but due to simpler optics and more basic coatings, they're often more prone to aberrations.

Interestingly, though, that's not always a bad thing. Aberrations can have their charm in certain types of photos

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04-20-2016, 02:20 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Wild Mark Quote
I am really interested to see if this is in fact the case.
While the fashionistas insist that fringe is in style this season, I'm not personally a fan... especially when it's purple and green and all over my images. If you shoot high contrast areas prone to fringing, you'll see at least one notable difference between even the nicest older lenses and modern ones.
04-20-2016, 02:28 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by narual Quote
While the fashionistas insist that fringe is in style this season, I'm not personally a fan... especially when it's purple and green and all over my images. If you shoot high contrast areas prone to fringing, you'll see at least one notable difference between even the nicest older lenses and modern ones.
Your generalisation is not true for all legacy lenses. Many praise the FA limited but they fringe too. I have many legacy lenses, the good ones, and the fringing style is not apparent as you suggest. I think many will be surprised.

---------- Post added 04-21-16 at 07:35 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by HYS Quote
Personally I do love the old SMC lenses. BUT... a lot of CA, really too much. May be I do something wrong. On my K-3 I haven't done too much.
I find CA occurs greatest either side of the critical focus when shooting wide open or thereabouts. Stopped down and this artefact disappears in the better lenses. Who shoots wide open all the time anyway

QuoteOriginally posted by Adam Quote
but due to simpler optics and more basic coatings
Hmmm I remain relatively mute on this debate. Not convinced. Sure coatings have improved but aren't we talking 1%'ers? SMC since the 80's has not improved that much. Simpler optics? Yes if one were to consider ED glass etc, but, some of the older lenses have these element types As far as design goes, little has changed unless you speak of IF and aspherical elements. On that note can I say I am rather unimpressed by the aspherical element in the FA28/2.8 - the F28/2.8 is a superior lens and it uses the older optical design.

Anyways, much of this debate is about taste and on that score the blind poll will make for interesting comparisons and opinions

04-20-2016, 03:43 PM - 1 Like   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by Wild Mark Quote
Your generalisation is not true for all legacy lenses. Many praise the FA limited but they fringe too. I have many legacy lenses, the good ones, and the fringing style is not apparent as you suggest. I think many will be surprised.[COLOR="Silver"]
The FA Limited is specifically what I was referring to when I said the nicest older lenses, actually. My 77 fringes like a 70s leather jacket. I don't think I have any film lenses that don't fringe noticeably wide open. It's more obvious with larger aperture lenses than the smaller ones. My da* lenses can fringe wide open, too, but not nearly so much.

Somehow, I don't expect there's any magical characteristic of the FF camera vs the crop sensor bodies which is going to suddenly make this difference disappear.

QuoteOriginally posted by Wild Mark:
coatings have improved but aren't we talking 1%'ers?
It's not just the quality of the coatings. It's where they're placed. Film isn't very reflective. Sensors are. The rear element needs to be coated now, where in the past, it may not have been.
04-20-2016, 04:02 PM   #10
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It's not just the really old stuff. I have the Tamron 70-300, and it fringes epically, more even than my SMC 300 f4...

The newer lenses do pick up the ability to correct in-camera, though, so that's a benefit...

-Eric
04-20-2016, 04:11 PM - 1 Like   #11
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Since I normally shoot between f/5.6 and f/11 PF / CA will be less of an issue using K, M, A and FA lenses for me than other shooters. That's why I've snapped up so many of the classic lenses when they've come up the last two years. I've bought the dollar equivalent of the four new zooms - and I'll be very happy.

But that's just me.
04-20-2016, 07:47 PM - 1 Like   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by narual Quote
Somehow, I don't expect there's any magical characteristic of the FF camera vs the crop sensor bodies which is going to suddenly make this difference disappear.
I am not expecting 'magical' benefits but I am expecting benefit. Firstly, I make the assumption that my fast legacy glass (good stuff) is not meant to be shot wide open (but can be if need be). BUT the big aperture does enable opportunity to improve focus accuracy. The FF will have a bigger view to enable manual eye focusing AND the AF confirmation will be better than say the K-3.

Taking my first assumption a step further, I will probably refrain from shooting wide open, rather, shoot at the limits of the AF (i.e. f2.8). Here I get the benefit of manual visual focus and AF confirmation through the bigger aperture, AND, the benefit of CA/ fringing dissipating with each stop down setting (i.e. f2.8 +).

Lastly, I do think there will be resolution benefit. Legacy glass optics were tailored to FF format. Shooting FF lenses on APS-C has possibly enhanced the 'flaws' of the associated optics. In this respect I have seen considerable difference in lens performance between the APS-C and FF (Sony A7r). The FF camera I have recently used showed me that my FF lenses will actually perform better - with perhaps the biggest disparity evident in the SMC Takumar 35/2. ON APS-C the SMC Takumar 35/2 produced wicked light blue teal CA (yuck and hard to correct) but was considerably/ significantly less on the Sony A7r.

As monochrome points out, the price point of this legacy glass has over the last few years been pretty good. Many prime lenses can be had to the price of a single modern zoom. Ultimately I am happy with that equation too.

Last but not least, if it turns out that I was completely wrong then cool, still happy with the quality I get with this legacy glass AND I am a avid collector anyway and gain much satisfaction with this activity - as I am sure everyone does. IN this respect I am not afraid of being proven wrong

All differences aside (Legacy versus new) I think we will all be happy to have the ability to slap on some old glass from time to time for nostalgic purposes.
04-20-2016, 09:09 PM - 1 Like   #13
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Ironically I found my old film Olympus Zuiko 300mm F4.5 to be capable of very nice performance on my K-5. Honestly, back in my film days I hardly ever used the lens because the few times I did I was typically quite disappointed with the IQ results. In harsh light it can produce very strong CA with digital, but it cleans up well in post processing. In soft light it doesn't seem to require much correction. I think it benefits from the APS-C image center however, so it will be interesting to eventually see how it plays out in FF. On the other hand I suspect my Zuiko 50mm 3.5 Macro may actually perform better in FF format, however only time will tell. Based on my limited experience thus far I wouldn't hesitate to try older film era Pentax glass.
04-20-2016, 09:23 PM   #14
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A number of these lenses (maybe all?) were CA monsters.. even stopped down.. and flaring could be an issue also.

Beyond that the bokeh could be a bit busy looking too.. but some people like that look.


In the 'right' light though they will probably be fine... in a few weeks we might be saturated in example images.
04-20-2016, 10:14 PM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by Adam Quote
I'd say that this is the area in which modern lenses have seen the greatest improvement compared to older ones. Old lenses are sharp, but due to simpler optics and more basic coatings, they're often more prone to aberrations.

Interestingly, though, that's not always a bad thing. Aberrations can have their charm in certain types of photos
Thank You Adam!
I just needed to share my thoughts.
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