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02-19-2017, 08:58 PM - 2 Likes   #61
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Guys,
since most, if not all, crap landing on your sensor is organic and therefor polar it can be removed with water. Water is polar. Polar substances dissolve polar matter but not non-polar matter. Non- polar matter (most likely chemical stuff) dissolves in non polar solvents such as Ethanol, Methanol. Since, as mentioned above, most schmutz you sensor collects is polar (sweaty fluff, pollen and such like) you can wipe with non-polar solvents until the cows come home, you won't move it. Use distilled water ! It is dirt cheap from the supermarket.

Water won't harm your sensor as long as you don't drown it and it leaves no residue behind. Just moisten a swap and wipe from left to right or right to left once (don't go back and forth) repeat with a new swap if necessary. Follow with a dry swap and buff.

If you let crap remain on your sensor it will "weld" itself fast onto the sensor surface and becomes hard to remove. When this happens, pinpoint the spot, dab a bit of water on it, let it sit for a moment so it has time to soften and then wipe as indicated above.

Don't get all paranoid with fear, the sensor is more robust then you think. If it wasn't no service centre would take on the job of cleaning.

Cheers

02-19-2017, 09:05 PM   #62
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QuoteOriginally posted by Schraubstock Quote
Guys,
since most, if not all, crap landing on your sensor is organic and therefor polar it can be removed with water. Water is polar. Polar substances dissolve polar matter but not non-polar matter. Non- polar matter (most likely chemical stuff) dissolves in non polar solvents such as Ethanol, Methanol. Since, as mentioned above, most schmutz you sensor collects is polar (sweaty fluff, pollen and such like) you can wipe with non-polar solvents until the cows come home, you won't move it. Use distilled water ! It is dirt cheap from the supermarket.

Water won't harm your sensor as long as you don't drown it and it leaves no residue behind. Just moisten a swap and wipe from left to right or right to left once (don't go back and forth) repeat with a new swap if necessary. Follow with a dry swap and buff.

If you let crap remain on your sensor it will "weld" itself fast onto the sensor surface and becomes hard to remove. When this happens, pinpoint the spot, dab a bit of water on it, let it sit for a moment so it has time to soften and then wipe as indicated above.

Don't get all paranoid with fear, the sensor is more robust then you think. If it wasn't no service centre would take on the job of cleaning.

Cheers
i agree, stick to water in Lieu of the fact that there is no low pass filter or more accurately no protection in front of your sensor. Further more they have most likely used tin oxide to act as the low pass filter. which is easily removed by mistake with chemicals. The moral of the story NO CHEMICALS EQUALS a healthy SENSOR.
02-20-2017, 12:09 AM   #63
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...distilled water. You might get away with tap water, but why risk even a chance of leaving mineral deposits?
02-20-2017, 04:12 AM   #64
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QuoteOriginally posted by eyeball Quote
...distilled water. You might get away with tap water, but why risk even a chance of leaving mineral deposits?
Good point, and you only need to dampen it not drowned it.

02-20-2017, 06:32 PM - 2 Likes   #65
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QuoteOriginally posted by niceshot Quote
ALSO sometimes just fog up the sensor with your breath like you do for Lens and clean it with the q-tip OF COARSE I AM CERTAINLY NOT TELL ANYONE HERE TO DO THAT.
Hi
I decided to power read the entire thread and got stuck on this piece of advice.
I am sure the poster is well meaning but I would strongly advise against it. (It is also a classic paralipsis statement)

I must admit I have breathed on the front lens to help cleaning, but never the rear lens assembly of a zoom lens. Breath will collect inside the barrel.

The problem of course is, in order to fog up the sensor with your breath one has to go very close, you breathe into an enclosed cavity and this means all your breath is collected inside the mirror chamber.

Firstly you very likely shoot a bit of spittle even if you are careful and secondly you fill the mirror box with moist warm organic traces laden matter. Exactly the stuff fungus thrives on ! Don't do it !

Certainly don't do it after you just consumed a salami sandwich, salami is very hard to get off the sensor.

Cheers
02-20-2017, 06:54 PM   #66
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QuoteOriginally posted by Schraubstock Quote
Hi
I decided to power read the entire thread and got stuck on this piece of advice.
I am sure the poster is well meaning but I would strongly advise against it. (It is also a classic paralipsis statement)

I must admit I have breathed on the front lens to help cleaning, but never the rear lens assembly of a zoom lens. Breath will collect inside the barrel.

The problem of course is, in order to fog up the sensor with your breath one has to go very close, you breathe into an enclosed cavity and this means all your breath is collected inside the mirror chamber.

Firstly you very likely shoot a bit of spittle even if you are careful and secondly you fill the mirror box with moist warm organic traces laden matter. Exactly the stuff fungus thrives on ! Don't do it !

Certainly don't do it after you just consumed a salami sandwich, salami is very hard to get off the sensor.

Cheers
Very simple breath on the swab
02-21-2017, 06:03 AM   #67
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QuoteOriginally posted by Schraubstock Quote
Hi

Certainly don't do it after you just consumed a salami sandwich, salami is very hard to get off the sensor.

Cheers
That was my experience when I tried this years ago even without the salami. Human breath and spittle contain many things other than distilled water, and some of them stick to a sensor. You may get lucky, but I did not.
02-21-2017, 04:21 PM   #68
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QuoteOriginally posted by niceshot Quote
Very simple breath on the swab
And then smear the traces of (Salami ?) or whatever on to the sensor this way.

Sorry, but I just couldn't help myself

02-21-2017, 05:02 PM   #69
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QuoteOriginally posted by Schraubstock Quote
And then smear the traces of (Salami ?) or whatever on to the sensor this way.

Sorry, but I just couldn't help myself
That is your point of view , having said that you can always dampen your swap or q-tip with water. Do not soak it , only dampen it. Then clean your SENSOR ,and use a separate swab to dry it up. This means no methanol alcohol, hence no risk to the tin oxide low pass filter. DISCLAIMER DO IT AT YOUR OWN RISK

Last edited by niceshot; 02-21-2017 at 05:08 PM.
02-21-2017, 05:08 PM   #70
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QuoteOriginally posted by niceshot Quote
That is your point of view , having said that you can always dampen your swap or q-tip with water. Do not soak it , only dampen it. Then clean your SENSOR ,and use a separate swab to dry it up. This means no methanol alcohol, hence no risk to the tin oxide low pass filter. DISCLAIMER DO IT AT YOUR OWN RISK


"That's just your opinion-- but don't sue me if you follow mine!"
02-21-2017, 05:14 PM   #71
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QuoteOriginally posted by lithedreamer Quote


"That's just your opinion-- but don't sue me if you follow mine!"
I would never do that, I mean SUE YOU. First off most people should just stick to the blower followed by the sticky wand. That should solve 90 percent of those dust bunnies. OH and stop shooting at f-16 and look for these things, cause the law of averages it the more you clean that Sensor soon or later that DREADED SCRATCH WILL HAPPEN. Just like a Lens clean it as little as possible.
02-21-2017, 05:26 PM   #72
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QuoteOriginally posted by niceshot Quote
I would never do that, I mean SUE YOU. First off most people should just stick to the blower followed by the sticky wand. That should solve 90 percent of those dust bunnies. OH and stop shooting at f-16 and look for these things, cause the law of averages it the more you clean that Sensor soon or later that DREADED SCRATCH WILL HAPPEN. Just like a Lens clean it as little as possible.
I was just teasing y'all. I wet clean my own sensors pretty frequently without issue, I taking non-WR into the rain, I shoot without protective filters, etc, etc. I'll be sure to let you guys know when it all comes crashing down.
02-21-2017, 10:52 PM   #73
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QuoteOriginally posted by niceshot Quote
That is your point of view , having said that you can always dampen your swap or q-tip with water. Do not soak it , only dampen it. Then clean your SENSOR ,and use a separate swab to dry it up. This means no methanol alcohol, hence no risk to the tin oxide low pass filter. DISCLAIMER DO IT AT YOUR OWN RISK
Hi
Somehow I had the feeling you wouldn't see the humour in what I wrote, let me assure you it was meant to be funny.

Thanks for the advise to use water to clean the sensor but it was me who suggested it in the first place together with the caution not to drown the sensor.
Read my post No.61

Cheers

And don't take things too seriously.
02-22-2017, 01:48 AM   #74
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QuoteOriginally posted by Schraubstock Quote
Hi
Somehow I had the feeling you wouldn't see the humour in what I wrote, let me assure you it was meant to be funny.

Thanks for the advise to use water to clean the sensor but it was me who suggested it in the first place together with the caution not to drown the sensor.
Read my post No.61

Cheers

And don't take things too seriously.
Not to worry and thx. Just a quick note , in this case you are actually cleaning the sensor itself as they did away with the prtection of the low pass filter.
02-22-2017, 02:28 AM - 1 Like   #75
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QuoteOriginally posted by niceshot Quote
in this case you are actually cleaning the sensor itself as they did away with the prtection of the low pass filter.
Yes and no.
In the absents of a Low-pass filter you are actually not "polishing off" the coloured filters which sit on top of the colour blind light sensitive elements (pixels) but what you will wipe is the Infrared filter (some sort of glass) which sits on top. It also protects everything beneath it.

Cheers
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