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08-05-2019, 07:16 AM   #1
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K1 MK II pixel shift settings

Hello,
I have a new K1 MK II and want to try Pixel Shift. I read the manual, and still can't figure out how to set my camera up. I will be using a sturdy tripod. Can someone explain it to me? Thank you very much.
Terry

08-05-2019, 08:23 AM   #2
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I've had my K-1II for more than a year now and I'm still figuring the pixel shift settings out. You have to experiment with them for sure. I'm still at the guessing stage. I suspect there is a tread or two already on the forum but I've been too lazy to search it out.
08-05-2019, 08:25 AM - 1 Like   #3
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The main thing to remember is that dynamic pixel shift is for hand-held shooting only. So, be sure to select regular pixel shift if you're on a tripod.

Also keep in mind that in either mode, the subject you are shooting should be stationary. If there's a slight breeze, then the motion correction setting can help eliminate artifacts in surrounding areas.

Lastly, I would recommend to always shoot in raw+ or jpeg, rather than just raw. The camera does a good job of processing the file, and it saves a lot of time in post, so I'd say it's worth at least having the jpeg on hand.

You can learn more about pixel shift itself here:
Pentax K-3 II Pixel Shift Resolution Tests - Hands-On Tests | PentaxForums.com

And the k-1 II's unique dynamic pixel shift for hand-held shooting:
Pentax K-1 Mark II vs K-1 Review - Dynamic Pixel Shift | PentaxForums.com Reviews

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08-05-2019, 08:38 AM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by Adam Quote
The main thing to remember is that dynamic pixel shift is for hand-held shooting only. So, be sure to select regular pixel shift if you're on a tripod.
Called "Image Stabilization" in the user manual.


Steve

08-05-2019, 09:29 AM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by Adam Quote
The main thing to remember is that dynamic pixel shift is for hand-held shooting only. So, be sure to select regular pixel shift if you're on a tripod.

Also keep in mind that in either mode, the subject you are shooting should be stationary. If there's a slight breeze, then the motion correction setting can help eliminate artifacts in surrounding areas.

Lastly, I would recommend to always shoot in raw+ or jpeg, rather than just raw. The camera does a good job of processing the file, and it saves a lot of time in post, so I'd say it's worth at least having the jpeg on hand.

You can learn more about pixel shift itself here:
Pentax K-3 II Pixel Shift Resolution Tests - Hands-On Tests | PentaxForums.com

And the k-1 II's unique dynamic pixel shift for hand-held shooting:
Pentax K-1 Mark II vs K-1 Review - Dynamic Pixel Shift | PentaxForums.com Reviews
Theres 3 choices for pixel shift. Which one do I choose? Thank you very much, Adam.
08-05-2019, 09:51 AM   #6
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Best thing on tripod is to choose pixel shift with motion correction for most situations. It is pretty easy to set using the the info screen. Click on the pixel shift icon then choose motion correction on. Typically I use a remote or 2 second delay when shooting in these situations.

I would start with jpegs and if you feel comfortable with it, you can try with RAW down the road (DCU or Raw Therapee work pretty well).

Hope that helps.
08-05-2019, 11:29 AM   #7
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Note that spotting the difference between ps and non-ps images can be difficult.

The biggest improvements can be seen in low light situations.

RawTherapee has a couple of advanced ps processing options, that go beyond what camera or DCU can do. It can show an overlay of the motion differences, which helps to select good ps captures. It also allows manually picking the primary image for the motion correction.

It's worth playing around with and makes it easier to compare ps/non-ps results. (A ps raw file can also be processed like a normal raw, only using the first image.)
08-05-2019, 11:32 AM - 1 Like   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by TerryL Quote
Theres 3 choices for pixel shift. Which one do I choose? Thank you very much, Adam.
With digital cameras, every exposure is free. Try each option and see which one you prefer.

---------- Post added 05-08-19 at 20:41 ----------

There are 4 options:
1) Pixel shift Off => normal shot.
2) Pixel shift enabled WITHOUT Motion Correction (M.C.), the camera MUST be absolutely immobile, mounted on a tripod and nothing should move in the scene you are photographying
3) Pixel shift enabled WITH Motion Correction (M.C.), the camera MUST be absolutely immobile, mounted on a tripod and the area of the scene that move will be replace by a single exposure image data.
4) Pixel shift hand-held (only on the Pentax K1 mk II), the camera MUST be hand-held , Shake Reduction (S.R.) is enabled, the camera manages everything for you (sensor stabilization, exposures and computing).

An out of camera JPEG image of the same scene can be produced using camera settings 1) or 2) or 3) or 4) for appreciating the different enhancement / effect of the pixel shift functionality. Have fun!


Last edited by biz-engineer; 08-05-2019 at 11:44 AM.
08-05-2019, 12:15 PM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
Called "Image Stabilization" in the user manual.


Steve
Thank you, Steve.

---------- Post added 08-05-19 at 12:20 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Rondec Quote
Best thing on tripod is to choose pixel shift with motion correction for most situations. It is pretty easy to set using the the info screen. Click on the pixel shift icon then choose motion correction on. Typically I use a remote or 2 second delay when shooting in these situations.

I would start with jpegs and if you feel comfortable with it, you can try with RAW down the road (DCU or Raw Therapee work pretty well).

Hope that helps.
That's perfect, thank you very much.

---------- Post added 08-05-19 at 12:21 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Rondec Quote
Best thing on tripod is to choose pixel shift with motion correction for most situations. It is pretty easy to set using the the info screen. Click on the pixel shift icon then choose motion correction on. Typically I use a remote or 2 second delay when shooting in these situations.

I would start with jpegs and if you feel comfortable with it, you can try with RAW down the road (DCU or Raw Therapee work pretty well).

Hope that helps.
Thank you Vincent. That's very helpful.
08-06-2019, 10:10 AM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by Rondec Quote
Best thing on tripod is to choose pixel shift with motion correction for most situations. It is pretty easy to set using the the info screen. Click on the pixel shift icon then choose motion correction on. Typically I use a remote or 2 second delay when shooting in these situations.

I would start with jpegs and if you feel comfortable with it, you can try with RAW down the road (DCU or Raw Therapee work pretty well).

Hope that helps.
If I use motion correction, I still turn of Image Stabilization for tripod use, don't I? I still have the directions to process the images in RT that you sent me. Thank you.

Last edited by TerryL; 08-06-2019 at 10:11 AM. Reason: spelling
08-06-2019, 10:48 AM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by TerryL Quote
If I use motion correction, I still turn of Image Stabilization for tripod use, don't I? I still have the directions to process the images in RT that you sent me. Thank you.
If you use 2 second timer or remote it will automatically turn off image stabilization.

If you are going to process in RT then I wouldn't bother with motion correction and use the motion correction off setting. The big thing that motion correction does is it looks for motion in the image and masks in your first shot image to fix those spots. RT is a lot better at fixing those spots and so if you are working with that I wouldn't bother with the motion correction setting -- that's mostly helpful when shooting jpegs straight out of camera.
08-06-2019, 01:07 PM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by Rondec Quote
If you are going to process in RT then I wouldn't bother with motion correction and use the motion correction off setting. The big thing that motion correction does is it looks for motion in the image and masks in your first shot image to fix those spots. RT is a lot better at fixing those spots and so if you are working with that I wouldn't bother with the motion correction setting -- that's mostly helpful when shooting jpegs straight out of camera.
Thank you for mentioning this. The motion correction settings apply to in-camera JPEG and RAW processing in PDCU only. They make no difference for the actual four-image capture.


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08-06-2019, 02:42 PM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by TerryL Quote
If I use motion correction, I still turn of Image Stabilization for tripod use, don't I?
In Pixel Shift (not hand held PS) mode the SR is disabled. This is because the SR mechanism is used to "shift" the pixels.
08-06-2019, 04:02 PM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by Rondec Quote
If you use 2 second timer or remote it will automatically turn off image stabilization.

If you are going to process in RT then I wouldn't bother with motion correction and use the motion correction off setting. The big thing that motion correction does is it looks for motion in the image and masks in your first shot image to fix those spots. RT is a lot better at fixing those spots and so if you are working with that I wouldn't bother with the motion correction setting -- that's mostly helpful when shooting jpegs straight out of camera.
Thank you very much. That's what I'll do.

---------- Post added 08-06-19 at 04:03 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by pschlute Quote
In Pixel Shift (not hand held PS) mode the SR is disabled. This is because the SR mechanism is used to "shift" the pixels.
I understand. Thank you, Peter.
08-09-2019, 03:03 PM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by biz-engineer Quote
With digital cameras, every exposure is free.
Except for the shutter wearing out after a few 10 or 100 thousand actuations
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