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09-28-2020, 04:03 PM - 1 Like   #1
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Basic Tutorial Video

I would greatly appreciate if anyone can point me to a very basic tutorial for making movies with the K-1. I've never shot video, so even the basics, i.e., focusing tips, shutter speed, frame rate, etc. would be of interest.

I have played with the video feature a bit and one very perplexing issue: how do I keep my static subject in focus when I am moving the camera toward/away from it? Next, how do I keep a moving subject in focus with the camera anchored in place?

Post-processing is a subject far in my future, so I do not want to ask anyone to spend time on that...yet.


Any help will be most appreciated.

09-28-2020, 05:17 PM - 1 Like   #2
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Shutter speed is the most important thing to set first. The rule of thumb is to set your shutter speed to twice the frame rate that you are shooting at. So if your frame rate is 24, 25 or 30 frames per second set your shutter speed to 1/50 or 1/60 of a second. If you are shooting at a higher frame rate to slow things down in post do the same thing. 60 frames per second gives 1/120 as a shutter speed, while 120 frames per second would be 1/250 as a shutter speed.

Set the aperture to a value that gives you the depth of field that you want to use. Avoid changing aperture while videoing as the noise of changing aperture can be picked up by the internal microphone.

Set the sensitivity (ISO) to the lowest value for your camera.

You will need to pre-focus your lens as Pentax cameras don't let you refocus while shooting video. You can always change focus manually while doing video.

I would usually shoot in manual mode so I can seen the exposure details on the rear screen, particularly the bar graph of over of under exposure.

If you are under exposed you can open up your aperture to a wider aperture or increase your sensitivity (ISO). You will need to find a combination that gives you the depth of field that you want at reasonable sensitivities (ISO). If you are still under exposed for your final aperture and sensitivity then you would need to add light, usually in the form of continuous light.

If you are over exposed you can close down your aperture to a smaller aperture or decrease your sensitivity (ISO). If you find you are still over exposed then adding a neutral density filter to you lens is the next step. A three stop ND filter will drop you three stops of over exposure and may get you into the right range to get a proper exposure.

I hope these things help you on your journey.

Regards

Chris
09-28-2020, 06:56 PM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by cpoteet Quote
I would greatly appreciate if anyone can point me to a very basic tutorial for making movies with the K-1. I've never shot video, so even the basics, i.e., focusing tips, shutter speed, frame rate, etc. would be of interest.

I have played with the video feature a bit and one very perplexing issue: how do I keep my static subject in focus when I am moving the camera toward/away from it? Next, how do I keep a moving subject in focus with the camera anchored in place?

Post-processing is a subject far in my future, so I do not want to ask anyone to spend time on that...yet.


Any help will be most appreciated.
Any YouTube movie making or cinema tutorial will be fine, Cpoteet. You have 1080 video available, which is broadcast TV and DVD standard.

For focusing and aperture, cinema traditionally uses manual focus and manual aperture, that's what any real cine lens has. Shutter speed constraints mean that ND filters are used outdoors, too.

You need to skill up!
09-28-2020, 07:39 PM - 1 Like   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by clackers Quote
Any YouTube movie making or cinema tutorial will be fine, Cpoteet. You have 1080 video available, which is broadcast TV and DVD standard.

For focusing and aperture, cinema traditionally uses manual focus and manual aperture, that's what any real cine lens has. Shutter speed constraints mean that ND filters are used outdoors, too.

You need to skill up!
Seventhdr, Clackers -

Gentlemen from Down Under, thank you! You clearly understand how elementary are my questions and how inexperienced am I with video. All of your tips are right on target and most helpful.

I have played with photography, all still shots, for 60+ years, so this world of video is somewhat foreign and intimidating. Your courtesies are making it somewhat less foreign, somewhat less intimidating.

What a world we live in that virtual voices from different hemispheres can so easily communicate.

09-28-2020, 08:14 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by cpoteet Quote
Seventhdr, Clackers -

Gentlemen from Down Under, thank you! You clearly understand how elementary are my questions and how inexperienced am I with video. All of your tips are right on target and most helpful.

I have played with photography, all still shots, for 60+ years, so this world of video is somewhat foreign and intimidating. Your courtesies are making it somewhat less foreign, somewhat less intimidating.

What a world we live in that virtual voices from different hemispheres can so easily communicate.
No worries!

If you have sixty years of experience with manual focus and exposure and using ND filters, it translates across very well to movie making. It's young ones who have trouble understanding that if they shoot at f1.8 for effect, they're in trouble because the shutter speed might have to be 1/50s, not 1/5000s in the case of stills.

If it all seems too difficult, just use your phone. Sure, it won't do exactly what your DSLR is capable of - narrow depth of field, changeable lenses, gigantic dynamic range, all that stuff a movie maker wants - but the tradeoff is that much is automated so as easy to use for video as a cassette player was for sound recording.
09-28-2020, 08:17 PM - 1 Like   #6
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The harder video skill to learn will be post processing!


I was where you were at about 4 years ago. I found learning to capture the video was fairly simple. However, I'm still learning the finer points of editing videos in post.


Some of the video editing softwares are very expensive and VERY complex. I use Adobe Premiere Elements 2020 because it's modestly priced and easier to learn than many. Also, it has an upgrade path to Adobe Premiere that builds upon the techniques learned in Elements.
09-29-2020, 04:53 AM - 1 Like   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Fenwoodian Quote
.
The harder video skill to learn will be post processing!


I was where you were at about 4 years ago. I found learning to capture the video was fairly simple. However, I'm still learning the finer points of editing videos in post.


Some of the video editing softwares are very expensive and VERY complex. I use Adobe Premiere Elements 2020 because it's modestly priced and easier to learn than many. Also, it has an upgrade path to Adobe Premiere that builds upon the techniques learned in Elements.
Same, I've dabbled with Premiere Elements. Editing is everything, and the rhythm's not easy. There are advantages to cutting to the audio and music and FX, which means you're having to think constantly. The audio too should be captured externally, which makes for even more fun and games! (I once had to document six speakers in an evening).

You'd love being able to use your Zeiss lenses for full effect! You'd get footage no phone could hope for.
09-29-2020, 07:43 AM   #8
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Only one thing I'd like to add myself: Turn off the stabilizer in video mode, because it's some weird digital (?) stabilizer that looks just horrible and morphs everything all over the place. As I understand it Pentax did use the SR in video mode once before, but stopped at some point?

If I may add a question (or two or three):

For still pictures there's RAW to have the most potential for post-processing the pictures. More video-centric cameras have the ability to capture moving pictures in S-Log and other profiles that look rather flat because of low contrast and saturation, to preserve the most potential for post-processing the material (?)
I don't think S-Log or comparable video profiles are available in Pentax cameras, so if one wants to capture video with Pentax cameras with the intent to post-process them, what profile would be best to do that? Just Neutral? Turn highlight/shadow correction / lens corrections on or off? Underexpose a little to preserve highlights as best as possible?

09-29-2020, 04:12 PM - 2 Likes   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by ehrwien Quote
For still pictures there's RAW to have the most potential for post-processing the pictures. More video-centric cameras have the ability to capture moving pictures in S-Log and other profiles that look rather flat because of low contrast and saturation, to preserve the most potential for post-processing the material (?)
I don't think S-Log or comparable video profiles are available in Pentax cameras, so if one wants to capture video with Pentax cameras with the intent to post-process them, what profile would be best to do that? Just Neutral? Turn highlight/shadow correction / lens corrections on or off? Underexpose a little to preserve highlights as best as possible?
Yep, there's no RAW video capture, and you want *no* extra saturation or contrast, because you'll do that in post as required, so keep it neutral.

That's also important when you combine footage from your second or third cameras ... your GoPro, phone, second camera or whatever.

Between cuts a shirt shouldn't differ in how blue it is.
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